Political Parties, Politics & Voting
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Political Parties, Politics & Voting

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Political Parties, Politics & Voting Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Voting Political Parties & By iTutor.com T - 1-855-694-8886 Email- info@iTutor.com
  • 2. Political Parties  A political party is group of people who run candidates for public office under its banner.  A party is a group that seeks to elect candidates to public office by supplying them with a label (party identification), by which they are known to the electorate.  United States parties have become weaker as labels, sets of leaders, and organizations. © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 3. By Selection of Members Cadre Parties Cadre refers to a nucleus or small core of indoctrinated leaders who promote ideological interests. Examples: Socialist Workers’ Party, American Nazi Party, Communist Party Mass Parties Mass party refers to an organization where anyone is encouraged and free to join. There are few if any tests for membership. Examples: American Democratic and Republican Parties. © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 4. By Nature of Ideology Missionary Parties  Missionary party refers to a highly ideological organization whose members must be recruited and converted to the tenets or values of the organization.  Examples: Prohibition Party, Communist Party Broker Parties  A Broker is someone who buys and sells on a commission. A broker party is an organization that is less ideological and is willing to modify its positions on issues in order to secure the most votes.  Examples: American Democratic and Republican Parties Broker Parties Want VOTES! © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 5. Ideology  Ideology is a systematic set of attitudes and opinions people use to justify their view of the political world.  There is no one ideology.  Ideology is thought to exist on a continuum from left to right on the political spectrum. Centralized Power Decentralized Power © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 6. By Degree of Discipline  Strong Party Discipline  Discipline refers to the degree of authority and power the leaders hold over their rank and file members. Parties with strong party discipline hold a great deal of leverage over party members.  Examples: British Labor and Conservative Parties  Weak Party Discipline  Discipline refers to the degree of authority and power the leaders hold over their rank and file members. Parties with weak party discipline have relatively little leverage over party members.  Examples: American Democratic and Republican Parties © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 7. Democrats and Republicans  Mass Parties--virtually anyone can join.  Broker Parties--looking for votes, not converts.  Decentralized Parties--power is widely dispersed.  Weak Party Discipline--leaders exert few sanctions. Democrat Republican © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 8. Functions of Political Parties a) Promote stability b) Recruit leaders c) Organize government d) Help educate citizens e) Provide loyal opposition f) Spawn civic engagement g) Simplify choices © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 9. Promote Stability  Major political parties serve as a buffer to soften the class of extremism. They do so by building coalitions and brokering compromises. Recruit Leaders  Modern governments need quality leaders. Political parties serve as personnel agencies to identify, recruit and promote competent public servants. Organize government  Without some mechanism to organize the law-making process, legislative bodies would be nearly impossible to function. Party leaders set legislative priorities and help enact laws. Help Educate Citizens  Parties help define issues and educate voters about their positions on public policy. © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 10. Provide Loyal Opposition  The party out of power serves as watchdog to keep the governing party from abusing its authority. Spawn Civic Engagement  Parties help register voters and organize get-out-to-vote drives.  Voter turnout in partisan elections, all things being equal, is significantly higher than in non-partisan elections. Simplify Choices  Most voters do not have the time, resources or inclination to study every candidate and issue. The parties help simplify their choices. © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 11. A Two-Party System  Tradition  It seems the United States has nearly always had a strong two- party system.  It is part of our nation’s history and tradition.  Social Consensus  If a nation can achieve a “consensus” on fundamental values, then two parties are all that is needed to resolve secondary issues.  Economic Divisions  Some believe our two major political parties represent an economic division between the so- called “haves” and “have nots” in American society. Development of the America’s Two-Party System© iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 12.  Political Socialization  The primary agent of partisan transmission is the family.  Most American families are either identify with or lean to either the Democratic Party or the Republican Party.  Few American children are socialized to be anything else.  Legal Restrictions  Most legal restrictions are imposed by the 50 state constitutions and legislation.  Historically, state governments have enacted laws that favor the two major political parties.  For most U.S. elections, political candidates are elected from single-member districts where the winner-takes all. © iTutor. 2000-2013. All Rights Reserved
  • 13. Call us for more information: www.iTutor.com 1-855-694-8886 Visit