Being SMART about Internet Safety

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Presentation about Internet Safety given at ICE 2009

Presentation about Internet Safety given at ICE 2009

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  • 1. BEING SMART ABOUT INTERNET SAFETY Erica Roberts, Technology Facilitator Springman Middle School, Glenview, IL
  • 2. THINK BEFORE YOU POST http://tcs.cybertipline.com/videos.htm
  • 3. SOME HISTORY
  • 4. “Each public school shall adopt a curriculum for Internet safety instruction of students in grades kindergarten through 12. The curriculum must be age appropriate and provide for a minimum of 2.5 hours of instruction on each of the following subjects: •Safe and responsible navigation and communication on social networking websites, chat rooms, electronic mail, bulletin boards, instant messenger, and other means of communication on the Internet. •Recognizing and reporting solicitations by sexual predators online. •Dangers of transmitting personal information on the Internet. •Recognizing and avoiding unsolicited or deceptive communications received online. •Recognizing and reporting cyber-bullying.” Illinois Internet Safety Education Act
  • 5. WHAT’S A TECHNOLOGY TEACHER TO DO?
  • 6. How can schools help students learn and apply the skills and ethics necessary to use the Internet responsibly and safely, given that students' home use of the Internet is often unfiltered and unsupervised?
  • 7. CYBERSMART CURRICULUM Online Sexual Victimization and Adolescent Risk-Taking Basic Facts Supports: CyberSmart! has adopted an integrated approach to impacting behavioral change based on current research findings on online sexual victimization, adolescent decision-making and risk- Teachers taking behavior and best practices in the fields of cyber security and character education. A Students listing of references used to compile this fact sheet can be found on the document titled CyberSmart! Position on Cyber Safety and Security. Parents The Facts Ninety-nine percent of Internet sex crime victims are ages 13 to 17. Younger children are typically more supervised and developmentally less interested in relationships online. Teens have a natural desire for intense romantic relationships and are exploring their sexual selves. Publicity about Internet-initiated sex crimes exaggerates fears. Several sex crime and abuse indicators have shown marked declines during the same period that Internet use has been expanding. Posting private identity information online, social networking, blogging, and writing online journals do not result in increased victimization by online molesters. It’s talking online to strangers about sex that increases the likelihood of meeting a sexual predator online. This in combination with providing personal identity information (including suggestive photos) dramatically increases the likelihood of receiving aggressive sexual solicitations involving actual or attempted off line contact. The majority of teens do not talk online to people they do not know face –to face about sex. In almost all cases of sexual victimization, teens know they are talking to adults online. Offenders rarely deceive victims about their sexual intent. The deception and trickery is that the predator slowly gains the victim’s trust over a period of time in online conversations that include sexual talk and innuendo wrapped in compliments. Violence is rare in Internet-initiated sex crimes. The overwhelming majority of victims go willingly on multiple occasions with the clear intention of engaging in sex. Many victims run away with the predator. In retrospect, victims explain were in love with the predator. Willing consensual sexual relationships between an adult and an underage adolescent are illegal under statutory rape sex laws. Adolescent risk-taking is not a cognitive issue but a social and emotional one (Reyna & Rivers, 2008). The conventional thinking is that young people take risks because think they're invulnerable. That's not the case. They actually carefully weigh about the risks and benefits of doing something. But then they decide the benefits--like peer acceptance--outweigh the risks.
  • 8. http://tcs.cybertipline.com/videos.htm
  • 9. QUESTIONS?
  • 10. CONTACT INFORMATION erica@iteachyoucomputers.com iteachyoucomputers.wikispaces.com