CHARACTERIZATION OF HISTORICAL BINDERS AND PIGMENTS BY LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE LIF

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CHARACTERIZATION OF HISTORICAL BINDERS AND PIGMENTS BY LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE LIF

  1. 1. Science and Technologyfor the Conservation of Cultural Heritage. CHARACTERIZATION OFHISTORICAL BINDERS AND PIGMENTS BY LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE LIF by Martina ROMANI
  2. 2. Know To Keep. Raffaello Sanzio. Basilica superiore, Assisi.Caves of Lascaux Andy Warhol..
  3. 3. Needs.• Need to know to keep.• Need for non-destructive surveys for the knowledge of materials.• Need to characterize the material as a pictorial problem of considerable interest.• Need to identify the presence of consolidant phenomena of biodegradation, and protective.• Need to create a reference database for historical binders and pigments.
  4. 4. Response.The laser-induced fluorescence in the UV, asa response to highlight:•Phenomena of biodegradation.•Consolidating.•Main constituents binders and pigments.Working with laser beams at highbrightness, monochromatic and directional,(with a distance from the target (> 20 m)),it is possible the development of remotediagnostics spectroscopic with restitution ofimages (2D) and models (3D) highresolution (<0.5 mm).
  5. 5. Fluorescence.•The material absorbs energy inthe form of radiation.•Emission with a frequency lowerthan the initial one. •spectroscopy of fluorescence spectroscopic technique whose main applications are in the range spectral UV- VIS. •Measurement of the radiation emitted after excitation. •Study of the absorption and emission spectra, which depending on the structure of the material.
  6. 6. Laser Tool (LIF),ENEA Frascati.
  7. 7. •Laser hits theHow does it works? surface. •UV beam, excites pigment / binder that emits light VIS. •The emission collection is analyzed by a detector. UV Laser •Achievement: Fluorescence Spectrum
  8. 8. Materials and Methods Preparation of Samples.The materials used in thisresearch are pigmentsand binders.The pigments are coloredsubstances that are appliedon a surface by means of amedium in which they areinsoluble, or dispersed in amass.The binders or mediumsare organicsubstances, protein-basedor lipid delegated the Stages of the preparation of the mixturesfunction to bind, and pigment binder. After grinding theadhere the pigment to the powder we proceed to mixing with thesurface. binder and the next draft.
  9. 9. Preparation Of Samples.The binders prepared according toancient recipes: Cennino Cennini andDry Suardo. Following lying either singly ormixed with pigments, of three typesof support; glass, aluminum and Pigments and Binders oncardboard black. Alluminium and Black Cardboard. For the analysis of the pigments, in the absence of the classical binders, use has been made to the achievement of the tablets in KBr.Pigments and Binders on Glass.
  10. 10. Mesures of samples laser to the laser (LIF). Order d Analysis of Samples: 1) Analysis of samples of binders 2) Analysis of samples from the pigment-binder mixtures 3) Analysis of pigments in KBr tablets. All prepared samples were analyzed at the wavelengths of 266 nm and 355 nm. Completed the measures the study began decoding of the spectra, and the work of creating the database.
  11. 11. Binder’s Database.Binder on cardboard. λ : 266 nm. λ : 355 nm.Red Yolk. 4 x 10 5000 2.5 4500Technique of 4000 2 3500Tempera paints. 1.5 3000 2500 1 2000 1500Leonardo Da Vinci; 0.5 1000 5001494-1498 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 200 300 400 500 600 700 800
  12. 12. Pigment’s Database.Mixture Inorganic Pigment- λ : 266 nm. λ : 355 nm.Binder.Yellow oxidedispersed in 2500 5000 4500Linseed Oil. 2000 4000 3500 1500 3000Oil Painting. 1000 2500 2000 1500 500Anonymous 1000 500 200 300 400 500 600 700 800Fiorentino. 200 300 400 500 600 700 800
  13. 13. Lacquer madder dispersed in linseed oil.Oil on board.Jan Vermeer, 1651.200018001600140012001000 800 600 400 200 0 200 300 400 500 600 700 800500045004000350030002500200015001000 500 200 300 400 500 600 700
  14. 14. The Case of Indigo; Organic or Inorganic?
  15. 15. Conclusions.• Responses to the needs of the Conservation Scientist.• LIF analysis for current information on the conservation status.• Identification of biological attacks and details of the methods of restoration of cultural heritage under study.• Database as a tool for collecting, exchanging and comparing.
  16. 16. Future Perspectives. Enrichment of Database by:• Additional measures of Organic Pigments.• Exchanges and comparisons with related databases.• Inclusion of measures of standard samples subjected to accelerated aging and degradation in a climatic chamber.
  17. 17. Grazie a tutti perl’attenzione. Martina Romani. martiromani1989@gmail.com

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