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  • 1. This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 2. The lean startupOpportunity Recognition WorkshopThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 3. 9 out of 10 start-ups orproducts failThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 4. 58 ideas = 1 successThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 5. 66% of successful start-ups drastically changetheir original plansThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 6. Not a better Plan A but apath to a plan thatworksThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 7. Plan that works =Scalable, repeatable,business modelThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 8. Product market fit is thefirst thing that mattersThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 9. Three stages of a startupStage 1Problem /solution fitProduct /market fitScaleStage 2 Stage 3Do I have a problemworth solving?Have I built somethingpeople want?How do I accelerategrowth?Focus = validated learningExperiments = pivotsTerrain = qualitativeFocus = growthExperiments = optimizationsTerrain = quantitativeThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 10. Lean manufacturing§  Practice developed inearly 90’s by Toyota§  Improve efficiencybased on TPS ( = JIT +automation)§  Eliminate Waste (whatdoes not generatevalue) in productionprocess§  Methodology applied in other businesses such asproduction, Government, services, software development,etc.Use your scarceresources togenerate value onlyThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 11. Customer development§  Methodology created inmid 90’s by Steve Blank§  Documented in “The foursteps to the epiphany”§  Scientific approach toimprove the productssuccess by developing abetter understandingof the consumersGet out of thebuilding!This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 12. This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 13. Customer development methodology§  Parallel process to product development§  Rigid consumer milestones instead of FCS§  Comprehensive documentation§  Emphasis on learning & discovery before executionThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 14. The lean startup§  Developed in 2008 by Eric Ries§  Documented in “The Leanstartup”§  = Lean philosophy + customerdevelopment + agile principles§  Approach based on validatedlearning, scientificexperimentation and shortiterationsThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 15. Build, Measure, Learn and iterateMinimize total timethrough the loopSource: Eric RiesThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 16. Customer development + agiledevelopmentThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 17. Minimum Viable ProductThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 18. What is an MVP?A MVP is the most pared down version of aproduct that can still be released§  It has enough value that people are willing to use itor buy it initially§  It demonstrates enough future benefit to retain earlyadopters§  It provides a feedback loop to guide futuredevelopmentThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 19. Why do we need an MVP?The minimum viable product allows a team tocollect the maximum amount of validatedlearning about customers with the least effort§  Do customer recognize that they have a problem youare trying to solve?§  If there were a solution, would they buy it?§  Would they buy it from you?§  Can we build the solution for that problem?This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 20. MVP examplesBoring 3 minute video for their MVP that looked like anormal product demonstration (no code). When theyreleased the video online, their waiting list went from5,000 people to 75,000 overnight!Collects customer feedback using Google DocsUsed only one plane and one route to test theirhypothesis. As they worked out the kinks in their strategythey started adding more planes and routesStarted out as a simple WordPress blog with a widgetthat used AppleScript to send PDFs coupons viaMail.appThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 21. What lean startup does not mean§  Cheap or Bootstrapped§  Lean startup focuses on making real progress while minimizing waste. It’smore about speed than cost§  Only for Web 2.0, Internet and consumer companies§  All companies that face uncertainty about customer needs§  Lean startups are very small companies§  Also for established companies§  Yet another software development methodology§  Agile development can be part of it§  Release half-baked product and call it MVP§  MVP is delivers value to the customer and allows to learn§  MVP is core but only part of the methodologyThis work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0
  • 22. Questions?This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0