Presentation 082311

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Presentation 082311

  1. 1. Haiti - Response to the 12 January 2010 earthquake Life in Haiti – 18 months after ISCRAM Summer School August 23, 2011
  2. 2. Presentation Plan• Disaster risk country profile• National system of risk and disaster management structure• Main activities and achievement before January 12, 2010• Impact on the earthquake• Life in Haiti: 18 months after• Challenges• Conclusion
  3. 3. Disaster Risk Country ProfileA country prone to several hazards• The country has the 5th highest mortality risk to two or more hazards (Hotspots Study, 2005)• 96% of its population is living at risk, Haiti has the highest vulnerability rating in terms of cyclones among the region’s small island states (12.9 on a scale of 13)• One of the 10 climate change global hotspots according to the Climate Investment Fund’s Expert GroupSome drivers of vulnerability• Environmental degradation (2% forest coverage)• High levels of poverty (77% of the Haitian population live on less than 2$/day and 52% live on less than 1$/day)• High population density (up to 40,000 km2 in Port-au- Prince) coupled with the large number of informal structures GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.
  4. 4. HAITI: hazards Heavy rain Inundation Hurricane Earthquake Land slide Tsunami Drought Erosion
  5. 5. Inundations
  6. 6. Inundation scenarios : Léogane
  7. 7. Haiti: On Hurricane Path
  8. 8. 6/18/2010
  9. 9. Land Movements
  10. 10. Carries 2009 : mudslidePeligre : Land slide
  11. 11. Possibility of soil liquefaction6/18/2010
  12. 12. Liquéfaction – Port of Port de Port-au-Prince
  13. 13. Tsunamie – Haiti
  14. 14. 6/18/2010
  15. 15. Disaster Risk Management frameworkHaiti National Disaster Risk Management System• Haiti National Disaster Risk Management System is headed by the National Risk and Disaster Management Committee, led by the Prime Minister (Minister of interior by Prime Minister delegation), composed of 10 line Ministers and the President of the Haitian Red Cross• Operational arms: Directorate for Civil Protection (DPC) and Permanent Secretariat for Risk and Disaster Management (SPGRD)• Emphasis on decentralization and strengthening of local capacities: a network of DRM committees in each of the 10 departments; and in more than 120 of the 140 municipalities GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.
  16. 16. COMITÉ NATIONAL DE GRD Présidé par Le Premier Ministre/ Ministre de l’Intérieur Secrétariat Exécutif : DPC GroupeGroupe d’Appui de lad’appui Coopération de la InternationaleSociété SECRETARIAT PERMANENT Civile DE GESTION DES RISQUES ET DES DÉSASTRES Gestion des Gestion des Risques Désastres Comités thématiques Centre d’opérations d’urgence (COU) Comités institutionnels / Coordination générale : DPC sectoriels Comités Départementaux Comités Communaux et Locaux
  17. 17. Disaster & Risk Management Axes of interventionsThe plan of actions in country is developed accordingto the following axes :•Disaster response – Decentralization andstrengthening of national and local capacities :Disaster preparedness, recovery, and reconstructionat all levels•Disaster Risk reduction: Towards a culture of safetyand resilience - Reducing the underlying risk factors
  18. 18. Vulnerability reduction Local capacity
  19. 19. Forces and WeaknessesForces Weaknesses• Availability of dedicated • Almost no functional EOC staff • Lack of material resources /• Departmental and infrastructures communal coverage • Lack of high qualify human (decentralized committees) resources• Trained members in • Immaturity of new communal affected area committees – no committees• Capacity to mobilize in some communes resources from support • Delay to get appropriate projects information for actions• Alert • Lack of scientific knowledge• Search and rescue teams (?) of eventsGFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continuedsupport of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India,Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UNInternational Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.
  20. 20. EOC NippesDepartmental level
  21. 21. Disaster & Risk Management Main activities before January 12, 2010 “International support group”The international support group is lead by UNDP. It’s plan of actions wasdeveloped in association of the national system and it’s part of the national one.On daily basis, at central level, United Nations Office for the Coordination ofHumanitarian Affairs (OCHA ) play an interface /facilitator role between nationaland international bodies.At regional level, depend on the representation on ground, the UN system andMINUSTHA are fully included in departmental or sometime communalcommittees. Joint National simulation exercises – joint contingency planCurrently UNDP – OCHA were supporting the system development
  22. 22. Disaster & Risk ManagementMain activities before January 12, 2010Considering its proved capacities in reducing lost of lifein case of disasters, taking in consideration the lessonslearned after the 4 hurricanes in 2008, the NationalSystem of risk and disaster management was workingtoward its decentralization (geographical coverage ofcommunal and locals committees) : new committeesand in reinforcement of existing ones.•Continuing effort to communities awareness;•Improvement of early warning systems – evacuationplans;•Planning of 2010 hurricane season contingency planwas initiated …
  23. 23. GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continuedsupport of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India,Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UNInternational Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.
  24. 24. Some facts• Most affected cities by the seism: Port-au- Prince metropolitan area, Gressier, Leogane, Grand Goave, Petit Goave, Cabaret, Jacmel• Port-au-Prince area: 65% of economic activities – 85% of taxes entrees• Jacmel: Tourism and craft pole• Estimation of lost: around 8 milliards of US dollars
  25. 25. Impact on infrastructures• Around 105 000 houses were totally destroyed• More than 208 000 houses were severely damage• More than 4000 schools and some university compounds were affected• More than 50 hospitals and health center collapse or were severely affected• The main sea port are inoperative and the main international airport building is severely affected and can not be use.• The National Palace, the Parliament, the Justice Palace and most of the Minister Offices and other administrative buildings are destroyed.
  26. 26. 60 percent of government, administrative andeconomic infrastructure has been destroyed
  27. 27. Governmental StructuresOffice of the PresidentOffice of the Prime MinisterMinistries Agriculture, Natural Resources and Rural Development Trade Culture and Communications Economics and Finances Environment Foreign Affairs and Religions Haitians Living Abroad Interior and Territorial collectivities Justice and Public safety National Education and Professional Training Planning and External Cooperation Public Health and Population Public Works, Transportation and Communications Social Affairs and Labor Tourism Women’s Conditions and women Rights Youth and Sports
  28. 28. National PalaceBefore After
  29. 29. Court of Justice Palace
  30. 30. Legislative PalaceBefore • After
  31. 31. Ministries Palace:Health, Public Work, Interior, finances, Planning
  32. 32. Sea Port ofPort-au-Prince
  33. 33. The State University School of Nursing
  34. 34. Institution du Sacre Coeur
  35. 35. College Catts Pressoir• Chemistry lab before • after
  36. 36. Cathedral of Port-au-Prince• Before • After
  37. 37. Villa Manrese After• Before
  38. 38. Hotel Montana • Reports say that at the time of the earthquake 300 people were inside but only 100 made it out alive after the building collapsed.
  39. 39. Hotel Villa Creole
  40. 40. HUEH: Main university hospital
  41. 41. Economic sectorGrand Rue : Main commercial street
  42. 42. Residential and offices areas
  43. 43. Impact on Human
  44. 44. Thoursand died
  45. 45. Million was injured
  46. 46. Spontaneous Camps
  47. 47. Psychological impactAftershock reaction: Jesus! Jesus! •
  48. 48. Movements of population after the eartquake
  49. 49. 235.000 left the affected areas by buses
  50. 50. Responses to the needs
  51. 51. First 24 hours :Local response 6
  52. 52. Search and rescue
  53. 53. 15 days afterBoy- College St Gerard, PaP
  54. 54. Humanitarian response
  55. 55. Mass arrival of missions & NGO from lot of countries
  56. 56. Multiplication of clustersHeath servicesDrug and medical supplieslogisticsMobile clinicEpidemiological surveillanceHygiene and environmentRehabilitationMental HeathVaccination Mapping 10
  57. 57. Medical supply
  58. 58. Health responses
  59. 59. HUEH – Many flags
  60. 60. TB tent
  61. 61. Pediatric Unit
  62. 62. Pediatric ICU
  63. 63. Line of patients waiting to enter the hospital HUEH
  64. 64. Sleeping quarters at Quesqueya earthquake relief center
  65. 65. Food distribution
  66. 66. Water distribution
  67. 67. Portable pottie’s provided at various tent cities in all public parks
  68. 68. Dommages et pertes 6
  69. 69. Estimation des besoins 7
  70. 70. Life todayNeed for continuation of efforts
  71. 71. Old and New vulnerable groups• Populations in camps• Women in reproductive ages• Pregnant women• Children : 0 to 5• Amputates / people with reduction of capacities• People mentally affected 17
  72. 72. Many amputationsSecondary to earthquake injuries.Patients are trying to return toSome sense of normality
  73. 73. s
  74. 74. Potential risk
  75. 75. Tones of debrits
  76. 76. Some lessons learn from the Earthquake response• The country structures have to be reinforced : They are the first responders• In case of big emergencies, Government tend to intervene directly on the response. Special training has to be made for Government members• Lost of working place has a big negative effect on mobilization and coordination activities in immediate post disaster• Agencies on ground need to be on the spots. That has to be consider in the response communication plan.
  77. 77. Some lessons learn from the Earthquake response• Some agency interventions are made regardless to the national plan of action. Need to reinforce: • implication of all key actors in development of plan; • Plan promotion; • and to have regular simulation exercises.• Multiplication of cluster make very difficult coordination of activities.• Countries has to be more strict on allowing entry of goods, volunteers… even when needs are urge. Early identification of needs and information sharing can decrease the amount of needless or not appropriate donation or efforts.
  78. 78. Today the country needs, in addition to the strengthening of entities of SNGRD working both in the responses to disasters and risk reduction, top scientific structures able to follow the risk factors and guide decisions making.
  79. 79. After January 12Efforts are being initiated.•Strengthening the civil protection structures at all levels: EOCbuilding, donation of means of intervention, training, staffing,extension of early warning systems…• Strategies revision (taken in account of the multiple hazards)• Follow up of risk factors - reinforcements of National deMeteorological center• Constitution and management of data base – quality controlof information• Increased capacity of having geological and seismicinformation• Studies aimed to implement scientific entities•Development of normative tools such as building constructioncode• Strengthening of education and public awarenessGFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continuedsupport of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India,Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UNInternational Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.
  80. 80. Capacity building
  81. 81. Training - decentralization
  82. 82. Search and rescue teams
  83. 83. Thematic committees TC Building code
  84. 84. Thematic committeesPublic awareness Flight against Cholera
  85. 85. 8th Consultative Group Meeting, May 17, 2010 Re localization Evacuation plan
  86. 86. National EOC
  87. 87. Infrastructure development
  88. 88. Plan de reconstruction de Port-au-Prince
  89. 89. 3,3 milliards de dollars sur une période de 5 ans.
  90. 90. Conclusion Efforts are being initiated… Much remains to be done in building resilience.We must make “Vulnerability reduction abase of economical development" of thecountry. (SE, Prime Minister Jean - MaxBellerive - may 2009)GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continuedsupport of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India,Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UNInternational Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.
  91. 91. In HAITI today…CAN WE TAKE ON THIS CHALLENGE !!! Yes We Can: one step at the time We have to without any delay to implement a comprehensible plan ofactions with the support of our partners
  92. 92. UN support and all partners were veryappreciated by the Haitian Government andthe different structures of the Nationalsystem. There contribution to the earthquakeresponse were remarkable even in abackground of lack of coordination. Inaddition of there material contribution, wehave to highlight the availability and thetechnical capacity of some members onground.
  93. 93. Thanks for your attention Q/A

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