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  • 1. TEACHERS’ PERFORMANCE AND THE RELATED FACTORS OF DIFFERENT COLLEGES AT LAGUNA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY SAN PABLO CITY CAMPUS ACADEMIC YEAR, 2010-2011 A Research Paper Presented to the Faculty of the College of Teacher Education Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City In Partial Of Fulfillment Of the Requirements in Methods of Research for the Degree Bachelor of Secondary Education Major in Mathematics Riza M. Umali October 2010
  • 2. Republic of the Philippines LAGUNA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City COLLEGE OF TEACHER EDUCATION Approval Sheet The Thesis entitled, “TEACHERS‟ PERFORMANCE AND THE RELATEDFACTORS OF DIFFERENT COLLEGES AT LAGUNA STATE POLYTECHNICUNIVERSITY SAN PABLO CITY CAMPUS ACADEMIC YEAR, 2010-2011” is preparedand submitted by Riza M. Umali in partial of fulfillment of the requirements for the degree ofBachelor of Secondary Education, Major in Mathematics, has been examined and isrecommended for acceptance and approval for oral examination. NELIA T. SALVADOR, Ed.D. Adviser PANEL OF EXAMINERS Approved by the Committee on Oral Examination with a rating of ______. NELIA T. SALVADOR, Ed.D. ChairmanEVA F. PUYO, Ed.D. PROF. MARILYN P. SANTOS Subject Specialist Statistician MRS. JULIETA A. SUMAGUE Technical Editor & English Critic PROF. MAURO D. LUCIDO JR. Dean, College of Teacher EducationDate:___________Research Contribution no.__________
  • 3. Chapter I The Problem and Its BackgroundIntroduction Teachers has always been taught as one of the noblest human beings. S/heconsidered as the central figure in the school and a second parent to the students.Because of the task a teacher must perform in order to achieve the school‟s vision andmission. S/he has a number of roles teaching, facilitating, and most important task is toinspire all of his/her students (Cebrel, 2005). Teachers are often viewed as the most important variable in learner‟s educationalenvironment. Many professor‟s in different universities and colleges says that a teachernever knew where his/her influence stops. Without the help of the teachers we don‟thave enough knowledge. Yes we all know that knowledge is everywhere but we need aguidance a good motivators and will direct the learner‟s quest of knowledge. Upon theirshoulders lie the future of our youth. The task of a teacher is virtually a variety of human traits and competencies. Theteachers job is not only to teach but to influence in promoting the development of basicskills, desirable work habits and attitudes, values, judgment and adjustments to theindividual learner‟s environment. In many instances teachers spend more time with their students than their parentsdo, school schedules are demanding so it is important for teachers to be effective intheir methods, instead of simply being the figure head of the classroom. They are
  • 4. attributed to two major categories which are personal and professional qualities. Personalqualities refers to the teachers personality including the teachers beliefs, interest, attitudesand his/her interrelation with his/her students, co-teachers, school administrations and non-teaching personnel. On the other hand, professional qualities pertains to the teachersmastery of the subject matter. Generally teachers are observed and rated by their supervisors. In some colleges anduniversities teachers in the tertiary level are rated by the students by evaluation sheet theteachers performance was rated. The items in evaluation instrument are generally similaracross all levels of education. The areas usually include teaching competencies,management and evaluation skills, professional ethics and personal qualities. Throughevaluation the teachers performance are being measured for improved.Background of the Study Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus (LSPU-SPCC) has itsown vision and mission. The university that accept and gives qualified and talentedstudents access to quality education. Based on the data I gathered in the administration office, the Laguna StatePolytechnic University San Pablo City Campus (LSPU-SPCC) employs 169 full time andpart time faculty members with a few of full time faculty holding administrativepositions. The faculty members commitment to quality education in the line with theuniversities vision and mission are evidence by the kind of class of graduates it produce.
  • 5. Statement of the Problem This study aims to know the teachers‟ performance and the related factors ofdifferent colleges in Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus A.Y.2010-2011. Specifically it sought to answer the following questions:1. What is the profile of respondents in terms of the following: 1.1. Age; 1.2. Gender; 1.3. Civil status; 1.4. Educational attainment; 1.5. Length of service; 1.6. Status of Occupation; 1.7. Department or college; and 1.8. Monthly salary?2. What is the level of perception of the following variables as perceive by the respondents: 2.1. Commitment; 2.2. Knowledge of the subject; 2.3. Teaching Strategies and methodologies; and 2.4. Management of learning?3. What is the level of performance of the respondents?4. Are the following variables significantly related to teachers‟ performance: 4.1. Commitment; 4.2. Knowledge of the subject; 4.3. Teaching strategies and methodologies; and 4.4. Management of learning?5.Is there a significant relationship between the profile of the respondents and the teachersperformance?
  • 6. Significance of the Study This study is significant to the school, to the teacher and to the students.It‟s significance to the school is to provide them concrete and reasonable basis regardingteachers performance and could help them analyze and do possible actions to improvedthe teachers performance. The result of the study could give encouragement for the teachers to enhancemore their capacity and effectiveness in performing their duties and obligations. For the students, the findings of the study could enhance students awarenessregarding teachers performance and could lead them to better understanding of howimportant the efficiency and effectivity of a teacher in performing his duties andobligations.Scope and Limitation This study was rendered to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of theteachers performance in selected institution of different colleges of the Laguna StatePolytechnic University San Pablo City Campus. Presently employed as a full time or parttime faculty members of the university. Due to the large number of teachers employed by the university, the researcherhave limit the number of participants by selecting few respondents in differentinstitutions/colleges as the focus of the study namely CED, CAS, CCST, CET, andCHMT. The researcher will get eight (8) teacher as a respondents from each colleges. A total of forty (40) respondents were included in the study.
  • 7. Conceptual Framework The conceptual framework of this study is presented to give view of the work to be done.The inputs or the independent variables are the ways by which the teacher‟s profile is to beanalyzed, taking into account their personal attributes and insights on teacher‟s personal andprofessional qualities. The process is the strategy to be used such as generating data through the use ofquestionnaire. The possible output or the dependent variable is their teacher‟s performance thatwill be based on their evaluation. Independent Variables Dependent Variable I. Profile of the respondents age gender civil status educational attainment length of service status of occupation department or college monthly salary TEACHER‟S PERFORMANCE II. Teacher - related factors Commitment Knowledge of the subject Teaching strategies Management of learningFigure 1. Research ParadigmHypotheses
  • 8. There is no significant relationship between the teacher – related factors and the teacher‟sperformance. There is no significant relationship between the profile of the respondents and theteachers performance.Definition of Terms For a better understanding of this study, the following terms are operationallydefined.Teacher. Refers to the second parent of the students in the school.Performance. Refers to the capability of the teacher in performing her lessons.Age. Define how old or young a particular person was.Gender. it refers to a particular person whether s/he is a male or a female.Civil status. Refers if the person is single or married.Educational attainment. Identifies a particular course/major that a particular person attained.Status of occupation. whether the teacher is a full time or part time instructor.Length of service. if the teacher is full time instructor (regular) or part time instructor(with limit).Monthly salary. refers to the amount of compensation of the teacher s/he get every month.
  • 9. Academic rank. refers to the grade of the teachers.Commitment. Refers to the obligation of the teacher regarding his profession.Knowledge of the subject. Refers to the mastery and presentation of information regarding hisdegree of specializationTeaching Strategies. Refers to the technique(s) use by the respondents in delivering the subject.Management of Learning. Refers to the respondent‟s managing ability in terms of classroomsetting.
  • 10. Chapter II Review of Related Literature and Studies The chapters presents a selection of literature and studies that has a bearing onpresent study. Most of the literature gathered comprises the teacher‟s performance.Related Literature Columnist Fransisco in one of his columns in Manila Times (2009), talks aboutthe strengthening of teacher education which are initiated by Commissioner NenalynDefensor of Commission on Higher Education. Commissioner Defensor emphasized herpersonal advocacy “Save our Future-Save our Normal Schools”. She identified the nineoriginal normal schools that started as normal schools and are now either integrated withother schools and/or converted into universities. She enjoined the administrators anddeans present to do something to save the normal schools. Teacher education program isnow in state of degradation attributed to poor quality of teachers and therefore theurgent need to strengthen it. Chairman Emmanuel Angeles who delivered the inspirationalmessage reiterated the importance of teacher education in shaping the country and theneed to do something to improved the quality of teacher education graduates. He assuredall those present of his full support to strengthen the teacher education program in termsof allocating funds for faculty development, faculty improvement, scholarships, andoptimum use of information and communication technology. He exhorted everyone to domuch, much more the younger generation if only to prove our love country. He enjoinedeveryone present to work together and support the effort of Commissioner Defensor.
  • 11. On the studies made by Senajon (1999) regarding mathematical competencies ofsecondary Chemistry teachers from selected provinces in Mindanao reveals that greatmajority (70.4%) of the respondents are low achievers, thus are not competent to teachthe subject. Only 29.6% are average achievers. They are low achievers in three types ofprocess skills: measuring, interpretative, and translational. The teachers performance ininterpretative skill shows that they have poor ability to analyze and interpret manychemistry concepts particularly those that involve graphs and tables, and they are unableto relate and apply these concepts to daily life situations. Their responses to thequestionnaire reveal that they are too dependent on their textbooks, thus fail to exploreother possibilities to make chemistry concepts more interesting to students. They havenot developed confidence in their teaching instruction. Consequently, they tend to skip orlimit their discussion by repeating what is already found and presented in their texts. Various studies and researches has been made in order to identify the factorsaffecting teacher‟s performance and the effect of these teacher‟s performance to student‟slearning. Rivkin, Hanushek, and Kain (1998) identify teachers as a major determinant ofstudent performance, but do not describe teacher quality in terms of specificqualifications and characteristics. They show strong, systematic differences in expectedachievement gains related to different teachers using a variance-components model. Theirresearch identifies teachers quality as the most important school-related factor influencingstudent achievement. They conclude from their analysis of 400,000 students in 3,000schools that, while school quality is an important determinant of student achievement, the
  • 12. most important predictor is teacher quality. In comparison, class size, teacher education,and teacher experience play a small role. Likewise, Sanders (1998) and Sanders and Rivers (1996) argue that the singlemost important factor affecting student achievement is teachers, and the effects ofteachers on student achievement are both additive and cumulative. Further, they contendthat the lower achieving students are most likely to benefit from increases in teachereffectiveness. Taken together, these multiple sources of evidence however different innature all conclude that quality teachers are a critical determinant of student achievement.In the current policy climate of standards-based reform, these findings make a strongcase for gaining a better understanding of what really accounts for these effects. The resource-intensive nature of teachers coupled with the empirical evidencedocumenting the critical role of teacher quality in realizing student achievement impliesthat teacher policy is a promising avenue toward better realizing goals of efficiency,equity, and adequacy in public education. Indeed, recommendations for reforming thepreparation of teachers have become commonplace in reports aimed at improving publiceducation (Bush 1987). For instance, almost two decades ago in its call for improvedteacher preparation, the National Commission on Excellence in Education (1983) statedthat “teacher preparation programs are too heavily weighted with courses in educationalmethods at the expense of courses in subject to be taught”. The Carnegie Foundation forthe Advancement of Teaching recommended that teacher education programs require a3.0 grade point average for admission, and that teachers complete courses in anacademic-core subject in four years before spending a fifth year learning about education(Boyer 1983). Likewise, the Holmes Group (1986) advised all major universities with
  • 13. substantial enrollments of pre-service teachers (i.e., those who are preparing to enter theteaching profession but who are not yet classroom teachers) should adopt the four-year liberalarts baccalaureate as a prerequisite for acceptance into their teacher education programs.A decade later the National Commission on Teaching and America‟s Future proposedmajor changes in teacher preparation and licensure, recommending that authority overthese matters be shifted from public officials to professional organizations (NCTAF 1996). The recent federal education legislation, No Child Left Behind (NCLB), furtherunderlines the importance of having a high-quality teacher in every classroom in everyschool. The Bush Administration‟s proposal, which specifies what defines a “highlyqualified” teacher, is based on the premise that teacher excellence is vital to realizingimproved student achievement. This legislation, along with typical hiring andcompensation systems, assumes that years of teaching experience, teacher certification,engagement in certain types of course work, and performance on standardizedassessments are indicators of highly-quality teachers.Related Studies Wilson, Floden, and Ferrini-Mundy (2001) in their review of the research onteacher preparation conducted for the U.S Department of Education reveals empiricalstudies conform to variety of accepted methodological approaches and a use a range ofmeasures of teacher effectiveness are used to ascertain what existing evidence says boutthe relationship between teacher attributes and their performance. In addition, thisapproach pays close attention to a number of contextual factors (e.g., level of education,subject area, type of student) as a way of drawing conclusions across studies. Clearly, the
  • 14. context of teaching is important and may affect the impact of the teacher attributesconsidered in this analysis. In fact, when existing studies are considered as a whole(without breaking them down by contextual factors such as subject area or grade level),findings tend to be existent across studies; context variable may help to explain theapparent inconsistency of the existing research. In other words, a particular teacherattribute (e.g., a subject-specific master‟s degree) may be an important predictor of ateacher effectiveness in some contexts (e.g., high school math), but may not matter at allor may even have a negative effect in other contexts ( e.g., first grade reading .). thiscareful attention to the contexts of teaching, wherever possible, helps tease outcomeeffects that that would otherwise go undetected in reviews that neglect to consider thisfactors. The goal off this study is to sort through the available evidence to drawconclusion about what matters, what has been studied but has not been shown to matter,and what has not been adequately studied Marsh and others, 1979 express that student evaluation of teachers performance, orstudent ratings, is one of the most of controversial techniques used to identified teacherseffectiveness. Few faculty members question the usefulness of ratings in providingfeedback about teaching that can result in improved instruction, but many continue tochallenge student rating use in making personnel decisions Aleamoni (1981) offers the following arguments to support the use of studentrating of teacher performance :
  • 15. a. Students are the main source of information about the learning environment, including teachers ability to motivate student for continued learning, rapport or degree of communication between instructors and students. b. Student are the most logical evaluators of the quality, the effectiveness of, and satisfaction with course content, method of instruction, textbook, homework, and student interest. c. Student ratings encourage communication between students and their instructor. This communication may lead to the kind of the student and instructor and involvement in the teaching learning process that can raise the level of instruction. d. Student ratings of particular instructor and courses can be use by other student to select courses and instructors, and may increase the chances that excellence in instruction will be recognized and rewarded. Based on the literature and other studies reviewed there is a significant differencebetween the teachers performance and their profile. It is a popular belief that age matters. Man‟s physical, psychological and cognitiveusually weaken and retrogress as a age progresses. It is determinant in the world of work whichaffects the perception of an individual as considered it as a length of time of life. People agedifferently because they have different heredity endowments, different socio economical andeducational backgrounds and different patterns of living. Normally, as person grows in age, hisphysical health deteriorates. But as a person grows older, his experiences also increase.(Calaramo, 2002)
  • 16. Newstrom and Davis (1993) claimed that as a workers grows older, they tend to beslightly more satisfied with their jobs. There are numbers of reason for this. To their worksituation, younger workers tend to be less satisfied with their jobs because of higherexpectations, less adjustment and other causes. Authorities, like George (1992) Kuhler (1995) and Weber (1995) had said that an age is afactor that affects the performance of an individual. As an individual grows older he tends tobecome complacent. He is not motivated to venture into new jobs or try to cater new skillsrelated to his job assignments. Older people have attitudes which are more highly crystallizedand have not readily changed and that tend to reject new ideas and changes. Younger peopleseemed to be more affective in utilizing group for decision making than older people. Age seemsto weaken ability to work jointly with others. De Villa (2007) found out in his study that most of the teacher-In-Charge belongs to theold age; it is perceived that they are well experienced in creating plans for the school and theyhave seen steps in achieving the school‟s goals. Capistrano (2003) mentions in her unpublished work that the older employees are oftenconsidered being inflexible, resistant to change, less creative and unable to deal with crisissituations. However, she also said that in some researches, older and younger employees, whengiven equal opportunity, will give the same quality of performance. The above mentioned studies of Calaramo, De Villa, Malvar and Capistrano found out tobe related to the present study since they all discussed the age as a variable that have significantrelationship with their performance.
  • 17. It is a biological fact that categories man into masculine and feminine. Gender roles arelearned patterns of behavior expected in any society. Because the social status of male is superiorto that of female, gender roles both reflect and reinforce a pattern of man dominance and femaledomination. The work experienced by men is called “technical” but management and maleworkers say that women do require “little technical skills”. The general cross-sectional tendencyhas been for men to to have more domineering and that woman to be more passive and nurturingthan men. “Female leadership holds special relevance for the 21st century”, asserted Jean LipmanBhuman (World Digest Oct.2004). she reported that for companies to survive in the nextmillennium, the boss must give way to management styles that is more empowering supportiveand nurturing, sharing relationship and traits that are ascribed by pre-dominantly malerespondents more to women than men. This is state of being married and unmarried. Marriage can make or unmake an executive,more especially a Filipino executive. A happily married executive is more stable as a leader thana separated or unhappily married executive. There is accumulating body of data that there aresome women who became successful in male dominated profession tend to be married and havechildren. (Napiza, 2003). Although conventional wisdom that marriage and children areimpediments to women‟s career, the seemingly paradox is explained. First, their martial andmotherhood statues showed a normal women‟s life. This made them more acceptable workingpartner to men who regarded women as interested in the social opportunities that worked offered.
  • 18. Chapter III Research Methodology This chapter describes how the study was conducted and the researcher used in gathering thenecessary data for the completion of the study. This includes the research design, the population andsampling, sampling procedure, data gathering procedure, research instrument and the statistical treatmentof data.Research Design The researcher used a survey questionnaire and evaluation form to gather information ofthe teachers‟ related factors such as age, gender, civil status, educational attainment, status ofoccupation, length of service, monthly salary and academic rank A.Y. 2010-2011. This is used toacquire the desired information.Population and Sampling This study conducted at Laguna State Polytechnic University, San Pablo City CampusAcademic Year 2010-2011. The researcher gets a representative for every department to suit theforty (40) respondents needed for the study. A random sampling as a sampling technique was utilized.Sampling Procedure To determine the sample size needed for the study, the researcher used random samplingtechnique. This sampling technique is unbiased since the respondent will have the same chanceof being chosen and the selection of respondent has no influence of the selection of otherrespondents.Data Gathering Procedures
  • 19. A request letter noted by the research adviser was given to the Dean of the College ofEducation to distribute the questionnaire to the teachers of different colleges in LSPU- SPCCA.Y. 2010- 2011. After being approved, the researcher distributed the questionnaire to theteachers.Research Instrument The main instrument used in the study was a questionnaire which was used to knowteachers person related factors such as age, gender, and civil status, educational attainment, andstatus of occupation, length of service, monthly salary and academic rank during secondsemester A.Y. 2010- 2011.Statistical Treatment of Data The data will be gathered from the respondents will be treated and interpreted using thestatistical tools. The following statistical analysis will be used in the study: Survey Questionnaire Gender Legend: Male – 1 Female – 2 Civil Status Legend: Single – 1 Married – 2 Widowed – 3
  • 20. Educational Attainment Legend: Vocational – 1 Bachelor‟s Degree – 2 Master‟s Degree – 3 Doctorate Degree – 4 BS with MA/MS units MS with Doctoral units Status occupation Legend: Regular – 1 Part time – 2 Percentage distribution will be utilized to describe the teacher variables in terms of,educational attainment, status of occupation, length of service, monthly salary and academicrank. For the teacher – related factors. The researcher will utilized the mean and standarddeviation using a Likert scale, 5 being the highest, denotes „outstanding‟ and 1 being the lowest,denotes „poor‟. To find that if there is a relationship existing between the independent and dependentvariables, Pearson Product Moment of Correlation Coefficient was used to tell how well two setsof continuous data correlate to each other at 0.05 level of significance.
  • 21. Chapter IV Presentation, Analysis, and Interpretation of Data This chapter presents the findings of the study in illustrative tables and analysis as well asthe interpretation based from the treatment of the data. Table 1 Distribution of Respondents According to Age Age Frequency Percent 20 – 25 6 15 26 – 30 8 20 31 – 35 13 33 36 – 40 3 8 45 and above 10 25 TOTAL 40 100 As shown in Table 1 it is clearly that ages ranges from 31 – 35 got the highest frequencywith 13 or 33%; followed by 45 and above with 10 or 25%; third is 26 – 28 with 8 or 20%;20 –25 with 6 or 15% and the least ranges from 36 - 40 which has 3 or 8% with a total of 40respondents. This tells us that most teachers who are employed in LSPU – SPCC has an age rangesfrom 31 – 45. Supported by Mift (2003) Teaching field is mostly dynamic for teachers ages from20 – 40 and particularly doing the utmost level of performance of teachers. Table 2 Distribution of Respondents According to Gender Gender Frequency Percent Male 13 33 Female 27 67 TOTAL 40 100
  • 22. Table 2 shows the distribution of respondents according to their gender, and we can seethat most respondents are female with 27 or 67% of the total respondents and followed by malecomprises of 13 or 33%. This implies that woman – for their sense of parenthood (Anderson,2001) commonly engage in teaching profession than that of males who are dominant for manualdexrterity. Table 3 Distribution of Respondents According to Civil Status Civil Status Frequency Percent Single 16 40 Married 23 58 Widowed 1 3 TOTAL 40 100 Table 3 shows that most of the respondents are married with 23 or 58%;followed bysingle teachers with 16 or 40%; and lastly over 40 respondents only one teacher is widowed.This tells that most teachers who are employed in teaching profession in LSPU – SPCC aremostly married. Table 4 Distribution of Respondents According to Their Educational Attainment Educational Attainment Frequency Percent Bachelor‟ degree 19 48 Master‟s degree 14 35 Doctor‟s degree 7 18 TOTAL 40 100 Table 4 tell us the educational attainment of teachers in LSPU – SPCC. Bachelor‟sdegree outnumbered other degrees with 19 or 48%; next is Master‟s degree with 14 or 35%; andleast is Doctor‟s degree with only 7 or 18%.
  • 23. Kylie (2004) mentioned that few teachers can attain a higher degree due to lack offinancial aid and personal problems like time for family and recreations and the like. As reflectedby Aguzar (2005) Filipino teachers render their time in upholstering their profession that willsatisfy their career in life like taking master‟s program then making advantage in higher rankingexample is salary as a motivation. Table 5 Distribution of Respondents According to Their Length of Service Length of service (years) Frequency Percent 1–5 24 60 6 – 12 8 20 13 – 20 4 10 21 and above 4 10 TOTAL 40 100 Table 5 shows the length of service of teachers in LSPU – SPCC. Most teachers arebelong to 1 – 5 years which is quite amateur for the institution with 24 or 60%; followed by 6 –12 years with 8 or 20% and lastly 13 – 20 and 21 and above which has the same frequency andpercentage with 4 or 10%. Table 6 Distribution of Respondents According to Their Status of Occupation Status of occupation Frequency Percent Regular 19 48 Part – time 21 52 TOTAL 40 100 This table explains the status of occupation of teachers. As we can see there is a smallinterval between the regulars and the part- timers but the part – timers outnumbered the regularswith 21 or 52% and the regulars have 19 or 48%.
  • 24. Table 7 Distribution of Respondents According to Department Department Frequency Percent CHMT 8 20 CTE 8 20 CCST 8 20 CAS 8 20 CET 8 20 TOTAL 40 100 Clearly table 7 shows that teachers has an equal denomination when pertains to thedifferent departments they assigned with 8 or 20% and a total of 40 or 100%. Table 8 Distribution of Respondents According to Their Monthly Salary Monthly Salary (Php) Frequency Percent Below 9,999 11 28 10,000 – 14,000 14 35 15,000 – 19,000 5 13 20,000 and above 2 5 No response 8 20 TOTAL 40 100 Table 10 shows the amount of teachers‟ compensation and most of them has an averageof Php10,000 – 14,000 with 14 or 35%; followed by below 9,999 with 11 or 28%; and a „noresponse‟ has 8 or 20% in which the researcher respects their welfare; 15,000 – 19,000 with 5 or13%; and the least 20,000 and above comprises of 2 or 5%.
  • 25. Table 9 Perception of Respondents According to Their Commitment Standard Indicators Mean Remarks Deviation 1. Teacher should always demonstrate sensitivity to Strongly the students‟ ability to attend and absorb content 4.9 0.37 Agree information. 2. Teacher must be sensitive to his/her learning Strongly 4.83 0.38 objectives. Agree 3. Teacher must make self available to students Strongly 4.87 0.40 beyond official time. Agree 4. Teacher should come to class on time, well Strongly groomed and well – prepared to complete 4.88 0.33 Agree assigned responsibilities. 5. Teachers must always keep precise records of Strongly students‟ performance and prompt submission of 4.88 0.39 Agree the same. Strongly TOTAL 4.87 1.87 AgreeLegend:4.21 – 5.0 : Strongly Agree3.41 – 4.20 : Agree2.61 – 3.40 : Uncertain1.81 – 2.60 : Disagree1.0 – 1.80 : Strongly Disagree Table 9 shows the indicator that „Teacher should always demonstrate sensitivity to thestudents‟ ability to attend and absorb content information‟ having a mean of 4.9 and interpretedas „Strongly Agree‟; „Teacher must be sensitive to his/her learning objectives‟ having a mean of4.83 and interpreted as „Strongly Agree‟; „Teacher must make self available to students beyondofficial time‟ having a mean of 4.87 and interpreted as „Strongly Agree‟; „Teacher should cometo class on time, well groomed and well – prepared to complete assigned responsibilities‟information‟ having a mean of 4.88 and interpreted as „Strongly Agree‟ „Teachers must alwayskeep precise records of students‟ performance and prompt submission of the same‟ information‟having a mean of 4.88 and interpreted as „Strongly Agree‟. With an average mean of 4.87 andinterpreted as „Strongly Agree‟. This implies that teachers of LSPU – SPCC are strongly
  • 26. committed to their profession. Ry, (2007) “teachers are not to compel to have a profession but toinstil that they must be responsible towards what they had committed”. Table 10 Perception of Respondents According to Their Knowledge of the Subject Matter Standard Indicators Mean Remarks Deviation 1. Teachers should demonstrates mastery of the subject – matter (explain the subject matter Strongly 4.88 0.33 without relying solely on the prescribed Agree textbook). 2. Teachers should draw and share information on Strongly the state of the art theory and practice in his/her 4.9 0.37 Agree discipline. 3. Integrates subject to practical circumstances and Strongly 4.93 0.35 learning intents/purposes of students. Agree 4. Teachers should explain the relevance of present topics to the precious lessons, and relates the Strongly 4.93 0.35 subject matter to relevant current issues and/or Agree daily life activities. 5. Teachers should demonstrate up – to date Strongly knowledge and/or awareness on current trends 4.88 0.40 Agree and issues of the subject. Strongly TOTAL 4.90 0.36 AgreeLegend:4.21 – 5.0 : Strongly Agree3.41 – 4.20 : Agree2.61 – 3.40 : Uncertain1.81 – 2.60 : Disagree1.0 – 1.80 : Strongly Disagree Table 10 shows that the indicator „Teachers should demonstrates mastery of the subject –matter (explain the subject matter without relying solely on the prescribed textbook)‟ having amean of 4.88 and interpreted as „Strongly Agree‟; „Teachers should draw and share informationon the state of the art theory and practice in his/her discipline‟ having a mean of 4.9 andinterpreted as „Strongly Agree‟ „Integrates subject to practical circumstances and learningintents/purposes of students‟ having a mean of 4.93 and interpreted as „Strongly Agree‟
  • 27. „Teachers should explain the relevance of present topics to the precious lessons, and relates thesubject matter to relevant current issues and/or daily life activities‟ having a mean of 4.93 andinterpreted as „Strongly Agree‟ „Teachers should demonstrate up – to date knowledge and/orawareness on current trends and issues of the subject‟ having a mean of 4.88 and interpreted as„Strongly Agree‟. This implies that teachers have a knowledge towards the subject matter theywhere teaching. As Mamen (2001) describes “teachers are benevolent materials of fact and reality thatshares their knowledge to their students and mastery is among the important functions ofteachers.
  • 28. Table 11 Perception of Respondents According to Their Teaching Strategies and Methodologies Standard Indicators Mean Remarks Deviation 1. Teachers should create teaching strategies that Strongly allow students to practice using concepts they 4.85 0.48 Agree need to understand (interactive discussion) 2. Teachers should enhance student self – esteem Strongly and/or gives due recognition to students‟ 4.8 0.46 Agree performance/potentials. 3. Teachers should allow students to create their own course with objectives and realistically Strongly 4.85 0.42 defined student – professor rules and make them Agree accountable for their performance. 4. Teachers should allow students to think independently and make their own decisions and Strongly holding them accountable for their performance 4.9 0.37 Agree based largely on their success in executing decisions. 5. Teachers should encourage students to learn Strongly beyond what is required and help/guide the 4.76 0.52 Agree students how to apply the concepts learned. Strongly TOTAL 4.83 0.45 AgreeLegend:4.21 – 5.0 : Strongly Agree3.41 – 4.20 : Agree2.61 – 3.40 : Uncertain1.81 – 2.60 : Disagree1.0 – 1.80 : Strongly Disagree In this table, the majority of the weighted means shows an indication of teachers whoteaches and allowing students to be independent; followed by the indicator 1 and 3 with a meanof 4.85 this reflects that teachers are student – centred and interpreted as „strongly agree‟. Meanwhile the last statement is also interpreted as strongly agree that clearly seen thatteachers used to encourage the learners to be existential in knowledge and skills. It is importantto note that a student – centred should accumulate the learners‟ surroundings and that willdetermine the goal of teachers in teaching.
  • 29. Table 12 Perception of Respondents According Their Management of Learning Standard Indicators Mean Remarks Deviation 1. Teachers should create opportunities for intensive Strongly and/or contribution of students in the class 4.9 0.37 Agree activities. 2. Teachers should assume roles as facilitator, resource person, coach, inquisitor, referee in Strongly 4.83 0.44 drawing students to contribute to knowledge and Agree understanding of the concepts at hands. 3. Teachers should design and implement learning Strongly conditions and experience that promotes healthy 4.85 0.35 Agree exchange ad/or confrontations. 4. Teachers should structure/re – structures learning Strongly and teaching – learning context to enhance 4.93 0.35 Agree attainment of collective learning objectives. 5. Teacher should use of instructional materials (audio/video materials: fieldtrips, film showing, Strongly 4.8 0.51 computer aided instruction and etc.) to reinforces Agree learning processes. Strongly TOTAL 4.86 0.40 AgreeLegend:4.21 – 5.0 : Strongly Agree3.41 – 4.20 : Agree2.61 – 3.40 : Uncertain1.81 – 2.60 : Disagree1.0 – 1.80 : Strongly Disagree Teachers‟ structure/re – structures learning and teaching – learning context to enhanceattainment of collective learning objectives play an important role of teachers in LSPU – SPCC.Attaining the second weighted mean teachers used to design based on the learning needs. Meanwhile, it is clearly seen teachers act also as facilitator and provide adequatematerials which is stated from the three least indicators. And the total correspondence is that the assessment for teachers‟ performance isdominantly strong and positive.
  • 30. Table 13 Perception of Respondents According Their Level of Performance Standard Indicators Mean Remarks Deviation 1. Perform the principles of instructional materials 5 0 Outstanding preparation for different types of learners 2. Perform different teaching methods, approaches 4.95 0.22 Outstanding and strategies. 3. Apply social realities in the community to make 4.98 0.16 Outstanding learning relevant. 4. Exhibit vividness and clarity in delivering the 4.98 0.16 Outstanding lesson. 5. Demonstrates the subject matter accurately. 4.93 0.27 Outstanding 6. Make the room comfortable for the students. 4.90 0.38 Outstanding 7. Explains the topic in accordance for student‟s 5 0 Outstanding level. 8. Know the different characteristics of students. 4.98 0.16 Outstanding 9. Value every students‟ concrete performance (e.g. 4.95 0.22 Outstanding project). 10. Apply knowledge on social learning in dealing 4.93 0.27 Outstanding with students. TOTAL 4.96 0.18 OutstandingLegend:4.21 – 5.0 : Outstanding3.41 – 4.20 : Very Satisfactory2.61 – 3.40 : Satisfactory1.81 – 2.60 : Fair1.0 – 1.80 : Poor Table 13 shows clearly that the teachers‟ performance as they evaluate themselves wereinterpreted as „outstanding‟ due also to their level of self – reflection. As we can see both markthe perfect assessment number one and seven partly explains that they perform in accordance tothe principle and explains the topic in accordance also for students‟ level. This implies thatteachers of LSPU – SPCC are consistently adhere to allow students to create their own coursewith objectives and realistically defined student – professor rules and make them accountable fortheir performance as basically Copico (2004) supported that teachers believe to be enhancingperformance in adherence to the attainment of students‟ level of maturity.
  • 31. Table 14 Correlation between Person – Related Factors and their Level of Performance Indicators r - value p - value Interpretation Age 0.089 0.807 Not Significant Gender -0.032 0.084 Not Significant Civil status -0.307 0.388 Not Significant Educational -0.046 0.900 Not Significant attainment Length of Service 0.180 0.618 Not SignificantStatus of Occupation -0.145 0.690 Not Significant Salary -0.127 0.377 Not Significantp > 0.05 : Not Significantp < 0.05 : Significant This table represents the correlation of person – related factors which is the teacher as arespondents and their performance in teaching profession. It is vividly shows that all thevariables for person – related factors has no significance in relation to their performance. Thismeans that teachers perform their profession with regards to their standards and not the persons –factors. Strengthen by Garote (2009) teacher himself is a teacher in the classroom and a teacher tohis learners regardless of his physical, psychological disturbance, status, and community rolesyet still he will only be affected by the pupils. Anjay (2009) confirms that teachers in modernize days prefer to be realistic and on –doing to their profession which likely to disseminate their personal part.
  • 32. Table 15 Correlation between Teachers – Related Variables and Their Level of Performance Indicators r - value p - value Interpretation Commitment 0.630 0.077 Not Significant Knowledge of the 0.111 0.397 Not Significant subject Teaching for 0.667 0.059 Not Significantindependent learning Management of 0.815 0.087 Not Significant learningp > 0.05 : Not Significantp < 0.05 : Significant Table 15 clearly shows that all the variables such as commitment (p = 0.077); knowledgeof the subject matter (p = 0.397); teaching for independent learning (p = 0.050); and managementof learning (p = 0.087) are not significantly related to their level of performance since p is greaterthan 0.05 level of acceptance. As cited by Greg (2003) The task of a teacher is virtually a variety of human traitsand competencies. The teachers job is not only to teach but to influence in promotingthe development of basic skills, desirable work habits and attitudes, values, judgment andadjustments to the individual learner‟s environment. In many instances teachers spend more time with their students than their parentsdo, school schedules are demanding so it is important for teachers to be effective intheir methods, instead of simply being the figure head of the classroom. They areattributed to two major categories which are personal and professional qualities. Personalqualities refers to the teachers personality including the teachers beliefs, interest, attitudesand his/her interrelation with his/her students, co-teachers, school administrations and non-
  • 33. teaching personnel. On the other hand, professional qualities pertains to the teachersmastery of the subject matter. Likewise, Sanders (1998) and Sanders and Rivers (1996) argue that the singlemost important factor affecting student achievement is teachers, and the effects ofteachers on student achievement are both additive and cumulative. Further, they contendthat the lower achieving students are most likely to benefit from increases in teachereffectiveness. Taken together, these multiple sources of evidence however different innature all conclude that quality teachers are a critical determinant of student achievement.In the current policy climate of standards-based reform, these findings make a strongcase for gaining a better understanding of what really accounts for these effects.
  • 34. Chapter V Summary of Findings, Conclusion and Recommendations This chapter presents the summary of findings, conclusions, and recommendationsrelated to the fraternity involvement.Summary Specifically it sought to answer the following questions:1. What is the profile of respondents in terms of the following: 1.1. Age; 1.2. Gender; 1.3. Civil status; 1.4. Educational attainment; 1.5. Length of service; 1.6. Status of Occupation; 1.7. Department or college; and 1.8. Monthly salary?2. What is the level of perception of the following variables as perceive by the respondents: 2.1. Commitment; 2.2. Knowledge of the subject; 2.3. Teaching Strategies and methodologies; and 2.4. Management of learning?3. What is the level of performance of the respondents?4. Are the following variables significantly related to teachers‟ performance: 4.1. Commitment; 4.2. Knowledge of the subject; 4.3. Teaching strategies and methodologies; and 4.4. Management of learning?5.Is there a significant relationship between the profile of the respondents and the teachersperformance?
  • 35. Findings Majority of the respondents are in the age of 31 – 35 having a frequency of thirteen (13)or 33%; twenty – two (27) or 67% are female; twenty - three (23) or 58% are already married;nineteen (19) or 48% are holder of Bachelor‟s Degree; twenty - four (24) or 60%; twenty – one(21) or 52% are part – timers; eleven (11) or 28% compensate an amount below Php9,999. The teacher – related variables such as commitment (mean = 4.87); knowledge of thesubject matter (mean = 4.90); teachers‟ strategies and methodologies (mean = 4.83); andmanagement of learning (mean = 4.86). The level of performance of the respondents has a weighted mean of 4.96 and interpretedas „outstanding‟. The person – related factors resulted as „not significant‟ to the level of performance ofrespondents The results reveal that the all of the teacher – related variables are „not significant‟ to thelevel of performance of the respondents.Conclusion There is no significant relationship between the teacher – related factors and the teacher‟sperformance is „Accepted‟. There is no significant relationship between the profile of the respondents and theteachers performance is „Accepted‟.
  • 36. Recommendations Based on the findings and conclusions made in the study, the following recommendationsare hereby presented: 1. Professors and Teachers should maintain in fulfilling their duties and responsibilities; 2. Institutions must provide training program for teachers designed to integrate knowledge, social, skills, and values development so that it creates a stress – free environment. 3. Teachers of LSPU – SPCC should have an active involvement in creating a healthy psychological climate for learning, like knowing the concepts and principles of democratic expression of ideas. 4. Teacher should always demonstrate sensitivity to the students‟ ability to attend and absorb content information; 5. Extend the scope of the study to provide further analysis on teachers‟ performance.
  • 37. BIBLIOGRAPHYAnderf Anderson, Psycholinguistic Experiments in Foreign Language Testing. St Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press, 1976.A. W. Oller, J.W. Performance Tests at School: A Pragmatic Approach. London: Longman, 1979.C. Farhady, and M. N. Keramati, “A text-driven method for the deletion procedure in self passages,” Language Testing, vol. 13, 191-207, 1996.Chohamy, E, “Investigation of concurrent validity of oral interview with cloze procedure for measuring proficiency in Hebrew as a second language,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Minnesota, 1978.Hinofotis, “Cloze as an alternative method of ESL placement and proficiency testing,” in J. Oller & K. Perkins, Eds. Research in Language Testing, Rowley, MA: Newbury House, 1980, pp. 45-67.K. Mullen, K, “Management of Teachers in U.S.,” in J. Oller, and K. Perkins, Eds. Research in Language Testing, Rowley, MA: Newbury House, 1980.Middleton, J.A. & Spanias, P.A. (2002). Motivation for Achievement in Mathematics: Findings, Generalizations, and Criticism of the Research. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 30, 65-88.Neale, D. (1999). The role of attitudes in learning mathematics. The Arithmetic teacher, Dec. 1969, 631-641.Pajares, F. (2002). Teachers Beliefs and Educational Research: Cleaning Up a Messy Construct. Review of Educational Research, 62 (3), 307-332.Polo, M. & Zan R. (2005). Teachers‟ use of the construct „attitude‟. Preliminary research findings. In M. Bosch (Ed.), Proceedings of the Fourth Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics. http://ermeweb.free.fr/CERME4/CERME4_WG2.pdf, 265-274.Ruffell, M., Mason, J., Allen, B. (2008). Studying attitude to mathematics. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 35, 1-18.
  • 38. Ry. Grotjahn, C. Klein-Braley, and U. Raatz, “C-Tests: An overview,” in R. Grotjahn, C. Klein- Braley, and U. Raatz, Eds. University Language Testing and the C-Test, Bochum: AKS- Verlag, 2002, pp. 93–114.S. Klein-Braley, “Language testing with the C-Test: A linguistic and statistical investigation into the strategies used by C-Test takers and the prediction of C-Test difficulty,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Duisburg, 1994.S. Klein-Braley, “C-Tests in the context of reduced redundancy testing: An appraisal,” Language Testing, vol. 14, pp. 47-84, 1997.T. Eckes, and R. Grotjahn, “C-tests: Rasch analyses via the continuous rating scale model,” In R. Grotjahn, Ed. The C-test: Theory, Empirical Research, and Applications. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2006, pp. 167-193.V. Lado, Language Testing: The Construction and Use of Foreign Language Tests. London: Longman, 1961.V. Parvaresh, and M. Tavakoli, “Discourse completion tasks as elicitation tools: How convergent are they?” The Social Sciences, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 366-373, 2009. International Journal of Human and Social Sciences 5:9 2010558Vi, X. & Kishor, N. (2001). Assessing the Relationship Between Attitude Toward Mathematics and Achievement in Mathematics: A Meta-Analysis. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 28 (1), 26-47.Zan, R. & Di Martino, P. (2003). The role of affect in the research on affect: the case of „attitude‟. In M. A. Mariotti (Ed.).
  • 39. Appendix A Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City LETTER TO THE DEAN OF COLLEGE OF EDUCATIONDate:A/Prof. Mauro D. Lucido Jr.Dean, College of EducationLaguna State Polytechnic UniversitySan Pablo City Campus, San Pablo CitySir,Greetings of the day! I am third year student of Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus, taking upBachelor of Secondary Education, major in Mathematics. I am presently conducting a study entitled
  • 40. “Teachers Performance and the Related Factors of selected colleges in Laguna State PolytechnicUniversity San Pablo City Campus A.Y 2010-2011. I would like to ask permission from your good office to evaluate teacher’s performance byadministering a researcher-made test to Fifty (50) teachers of LSPU-SPCC. It is in this juncture that I express my warmest gratitude. Should my request be granted. Thankyou very much.Truly yours,RIZA M. UMALI ResearcherApproved by:A/Prof. Mauro D. LucidoDean, College of Education
  • 41. Appendix B Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City LETTER TO THE DEAN OF COLLEGE ARTS AND SCIENCESDate:Prof. Lorna C. DanielDean, College of Arts and SciencesLaguna State Polytechnic UniversitySan Pablo City Campus, San Pablo CitySir,Greetings of the day! I am third year student of Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus, taking upBachelor of Secondary Education, major in Mathematics. I am presently conducting a study entitled
  • 42. “Teachers Performance and the Related Factors of selected colleges in Laguna State PolytechnicUniversity San Pablo City Campus A.Y 2010-2011. I would like to ask permission from your good office to evaluate teacher’s performance byadministering a researcher-made test to Fifty (50) teachers of LSPU-SPCC. It is in this juncture that I express my warmest gratitude. Should my request be granted. Thankyou very much.Truly yours,RIZA M. UMALI Researcher Appendix C Laguna State Polytechnic University
  • 43. San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City LETTER TO THE DEAN OF COLLEGE OF COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGYDate:Prof. Mario BrionesDean, CCSTLaguna State Polytechnic UniversitySan Pablo City Campus, San Pablo CitySir,Greetings of the day! I am third year student of Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus, taking upBachelor of Secondary Education, major in Mathematics. I am presently conducting a study entitled“Teachers Performance and the Related Factors of selected colleges in Laguna State PolytechnicUniversity San Pablo City Campus A.Y 2010-2011. I would like to ask permission from your good office to evaluate teacher’s performance byadministering a researcher-made test to Fifty (50) teachers of LSPU-SPCC.
  • 44. It is in this juncture that I express my warmest gratitude. Should my request be granted. Thankyou very much.Truly yours,RIZA M. UMALI ResearcherApproved by:A/Prof. Mauro D. LucidoDean, College of Education Appendix D Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City
  • 45. LETTER TO THE DEAN OF COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGYDate:Prof. Edilberto Z. AndalDean, College of Engineering and TechnologyLaguna State Polytechnic UniversitySan Pablo City Campus, San Pablo CitySir,Greetings of the day! I am third year student of Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus, taking upBachelor of Secondary Education, major in Mathematics. I am presently conducting a study entitled“Teachers Performance and the Related Factors of selected colleges in Laguna State PolytechnicUniversity San Pablo City Campus A.Y 2010-2011. I would like to ask permission from your good office to evaluate teacher’s performance byadministering a researcher-made test to Fifty (50) teachers of LSPU-SPCC. It is in this juncture that I express my warmest gratitude. Should my request be granted. Thankyou very much.
  • 46. Truly yours,RIZA M. UMALI ResearcherApproved by:A/Prof. Mauro D. LucidoDean, College of Education
  • 47. Appendix E Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City LETTER TO THE DEAN OF COLLEGE OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT AND TOURISMDate:Prof.Conchita C. EspinuevaDean, College of EducationLaguna State Polytechnic UniversitySan Pablo City Campus, San Pablo CityMadame,Greetings of the day! I am third year student of Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus, taking upBachelor of Secondary Education, major in Mathematics. I am presently conducting a study entitled
  • 48. “Teachers Performance and the Related Factors of selected colleges in Laguna State PolytechnicUniversity San Pablo City Campus A.Y 2010-2011. I would like to ask permission from your good office to evaluate teacher’s performance byadministering a researcher-made test to Fifty (50) teachers of LSPU-SPCC. It is in this juncture that I express my warmest gratitude. Should my request be granted. Thankyou very much.Truly yours,RIZA M. UMALI ResearcherApproved by:A/Prof. Mauro D. LucidoDean, College of Education Appendix F Laguna State Polytechnic University
  • 49. San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City LETTER TO THE RESPONDENTDear Respondent, I am taking a research study entitled, “Teacher’s Performance and the Related Factorsof Selected Colleges in Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus A.Y. 2010-2011”, as a course requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Secondary Education Major inMathematics. In view of this, I respectfully choose you as one of my respondents to answer theattached questions for the completion of the study. Please provide your honest response and rest assured that your answer will ne treatedwith utmost confidentiality. Thank you very much for your cooperation. Respectfully yours,
  • 50. RIZA M. UMALI Researcher Appendix G Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City RESEARCH SURVEY QUESTIONNAIREPart I. Please fill in your personal information and put a check on the blank to thecorresponding options that gives the profile of your personal characteristics.Name(optional): _______________Age: ______Gender: ___ Male ___ FemaleCivil Status: ___ Single ___ Married ___ WidowedEducational Attainment: ___ Vocational ___ Bachelor‟s Degree ___BS with MA/MS units ___ Master‟s Degree ___MS with Doctoral units ___ Doctor‟s Degree
  • 51. Status of Occupation: ___ Regular ___ Part timeLength of Service:_____________Department:___________________Monthly Salary: _______________II. Perception of the RespondentsPlease indicate your perception of these indicators using the values below and put a check on the spaceprovided. 5 – Strongly Agree 4 – Agree 3 – Uncertain 2 – Disagree 1 – Strongly Disagree A. Commitment 5 4 3 2 1 1. Teacher should always demonstrate sensitivity to the students‟ ability to attend and absorb content information. 2. Teacher must be sensitive to his/her learning objectives. 3. Teacher must make self available to students beyond official time.
  • 52. 4. Teacher should come to class on time, well groomed and well – prepared to complete assigned responsibilities.5. Teachers must always keep precise records of students‟ performance and prompt submission of the same.B. Knowledge of the Subject 5 4 3 2 1 1. Teachers should demonstrates mastery of the subject – matter (explain the subject matter without relying solely on the prescribed textbook). 2. Teachers should draw and share information on the state of the art theory and practice in his/her discipline. 3. Integrates subject to practical circumstances and learning intents/purposes of students. 4. Teachers should explain the relevance of present topics to the precious lessons, and relates the subject matter to relevant current issues and/or daily life activities. 5. Teachers should demonstrate up – to date knowledge and/or awareness on current trends and issues of the subject.C. Teaching for Independent Learning 5 4 3 2 1 1. Teachers should create teaching strategies that allow students to practice using concepts they need to understand (interactive discussion) 2. Teachers should enhance student self – esteem and/or gives due recognition to students‟ performance/potentials. 3. Teachers should allow students to create their own course with objectives and realistically defined student – professor rules and make them accountable for their performance.
  • 53. 4. Teachers should allow students to think independently and make their own decisions and holding them accountable for their performance based largely on their success in executing decisions. 5. Teachers should encourage students to learn beyond what is required and help/guide the students how to apply the concepts learned. D. Management of Learning 5 4 3 2 1 1. Teachers should create opportunities for intensive and/or contribution of students in the class activities. 2. Teachers should assume roles as facilitator, resource person, coach, inquisitor, referee in drawing students to contribute to knowledge and understanding of the concepts at hands. 3. Teachers should design and implement learning conditions and experience that promotes healthy exchange ad/or confrontations. 4. Teachers should structure/re – structures learning and teaching – learning context to enhance attainment of collective learning objectives. 5. Teacher should use of instructional materials (audio/video materials: fieldtrips, film showing, computer aided instruction and etc.) to reinforces learning processes.Direction: Please indicate your perception of these indicators using the values below and put a check onthe space provided. 5 – Outstanding 4 – Very Satisfactory 3 – Satisfactory 2 – Fair 1 – Poor
  • 54. E. Teacher‟s Performance 5 4 3 2 1 1.Perform the principles of instructional materials preparation for different types of learners 2. Perform different teaching methods, approaches and strategies. 3. Apply social realities in the community to make learning relevant. 4. Exhibit vividness and clarity in delivering the lesson. 5. Demonstrates the subject matter accurately. 6. Make the room comfortable for the students. 7.Explains the topic in accordance for students level. 8.Know the different characteristics of students. 9.Value every students‟ concrete performance (e.g. project). 10.Apply knowledge on social learning in dealing with students. …THANK YOU FOR COOPERATION…