Dutch php conference_2010_opm

1,728
-1

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,728
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Dutch php conference_2010_opm

  1. 1. Common Optimization Mistakes Dutch PHP Conference 2010 Ilia Alshanetsky http://ilia.ws 1
  2. 2. Premature = Optimization Solve the business case, before optimizing the solution 2
  3. 3. Don’t Over Engineer • Understand your audience • Estimate the scale and growth of your application (based on facts, not marketing fiction) • Keep timelines in mind when setting the project scope 3
  4. 4. Simplify, Simplify & Simplify! • Break complex tasks into simpler sub- components • Don’t be afraid to modularize the code • More code does not translate to slower code (common misconception) PHP has grown from less than 1 million LOC to over 2 million LOC since 2000 and has become at least 4 times faster. Linux kernel code base increase by 40% since 2005 and still managed to improve performance by roughly the same margin. LOC stats came from ohloh.net 4
  5. 5. Hardware is Cheaper! VS In most cases applications can gain vast performance gains by improving hardware, quickly rather than through slow, error prone code optimization efforts. 5
  6. 6. Hardware • CPU bottlenecks can be resolved by more cores and/or CPUs. Typically each year yields a 20-30% speed improvement over past year’s CPU speeds. • Ability to handle large amounts of traffic is often hampered by limited RAM, and thanks to 64bit, each new server can have tons of it. 6
  7. 7. Hardware • Drives are often the most common bottleneck, SSD fortunately between RAID and Solid State you can solve that pretty easily now a SCSI days. 7
  8. 8. Hardware Caveat • While quick to give results, in some situations it will not help for long: • Database saturation • Non-scalable code base • Network bound bottleneck • Extremely low number sessions per server 8
  9. 9. Optimize, but don’t touch the code • Typically introduces substantial efficiencies • Does not endanger code integrity • Usually simple and quick to deploy • In the event of problems, often simple to revert 9
  10. 10. How PHP works in 30 seconds PHP Script • This cycle happens for every include file, not just for the Zend Compile "main" script. Zend Execute ire re qu / lude in c • Compilation can @ method easily consume function more time than call execution. 10
  11. 11. Opcode Cache • Each PHP script is interpreted only once for each revision. • Reduced File IO, opcodes are being read from memory instead of being parsed from disk. • Opcodes can optimized for faster execution. • Yields a minimum 20-30% speed improvement and often as much as 200-400% 11
  12. 12. Quick Comparison 200 Regular PHP Zend Platform 150 APC X-Cache 100 50 0 FUDforum Smarty phpMyAdmin 12
  13. 13. Use In-Memory Caches • In-memory session storage is MUCH faster than disk or database equivalents. • Very simple via memcache extension session.save_handler = “memcache” session.save_path = “tcp://localhost:11211” Also allows scaling across multiple servers for improved reliability and performance. 13
  14. 14. Everything has to be Real-time 14
  15. 15. Complete Page Caching • Caching Proxy (Ex. Squid) • Page pre-generation • On-demand caching 15
  16. 16. Partial Cache - SQL • In most applications the primary bottleneck can often be traced to “database work”. • Caching of SQL can drastically reduce the load caused by unavoidable, complex queries. 16
  17. 17. SQL Caching Example $key = md5(“some sort of sql query”); if (!($result = memcache_get($key))) { $result = $pdo->query($qry)->fetchAll(); // cache query result for 1 hour memcache_set($key, $result, NULL, 3600); } 17
  18. 18. Partial Cache - Code • Rather than optimizing complex PHP operations, it is often better to simply cache their output for a period of time. • Faster payoff • Lower chance of breaking the code • Faster then any “code optimization” 18
  19. 19. Code Caching Example function myFunction($a, $b, $c) { $key = __FUNCTION__ . serialize(func_get_args()); if (!($result = memcache_get($key))) { $result = // function code // cache query result for 1 hour memcache_set($key, $result, NULL, 3600); } return $result; } 19
  20. 20. Compile Your Tools • Distribution binaries suck! • More often than not you can realize 10-15% speed increase by compiling your own Apache/PHP/Database from source. (unless you are using Gentoo) 20
  21. 21. Output Buffering • Don’t fear output buffering because it uses ram, ram is cheap. IO, not so much. 21
  22. 22. Matching Your IO Sizes PHP Apache OS Client • The goal is to pass off as much work to the kernel as efficiently as possible. • Optimizes PHP to OS Communication • Reduces Number Of System Calls 22 22
  23. 23. PHP: Output Control • Efficient PHP Apache • Flexible • In your script, with ob_start() • Everywhere, with output_buffering = Xkb • Improves browser’s rendering speed 23 23
  24. 24. Apache: Output Control • The idea is to hand off entire page to the kernel without blocking. Apache OS • Set SendBufferSize = PageSize 24
  25. 25. OS: Output Control OS (Linux) OS Client /proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_wmem 4096 16384 maxcontentsize min default max /proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_mem (maxcontentsize * maxclients) / pagesize ✴ Be careful on low memory systems! 25
  26. 26. Upgrade Your PHP • Before “upgrading” your code, upgrade your PHP. Newer versions are typically faster! 150 112.5 PHP 4.4 PHP 5.0 75 PHP 5.1 PHP 5.2 37.5 PHP 5.3 PHP-CSV 0 Speed % (base line of PHP 4.4) 26
  27. 27. Don’t Assume Assume nothing, profile everything! • One of the most common mistakes made even by experienced developers is starting to optimize code without identifying the bottleneck first. 27
  28. 28. Profile, Profile & Profile Xdebug and XHProf extensions provide a very helpful mechanism for identifying TRUE bottlenecks in your code. 28
  29. 29. Kcachegrind Xdebug provides kcachegrind analyzable output that offers an easy visual overview of your performance problems 29
  30. 30. Database before code • One of the most common mistakes people make is optimizing code before even looking at the database. • Vast majority of applications have the bottleneck in the database not the code! 30
  31. 31. Watch Your Errors • Excessive, non-critical errors, such as E_NOTICE or E_STRICT can only be detected via error-logging. • PHP code that generates any errors is going to impact performance! Not Easily Detectable by Profilers 31
  32. 32. Micro Optimization • Takes a long time • Won’t solve your performance issues • Almost guaranteed to break something • Cost > Reward 32
  33. 33. Speed vs Scale • If you are planning for growth, scale is far more important than speed! • Focus on scalability rather than speed, you can always increase scalable app, by simply adding more hardware. 33
  34. 34. Don’t Re-invent the Wheel • Most attempts to make “faster” versions of native PHP functions using PHP code are silly exercises in futility. 34
  35. 35. Write Only Code • Removing comments won’t make code faster • Neither will removal of whitespace • Remember, you may need to debug that mess at some point ;-) • Shorter code != Faster Code 35
  36. 36. Thank You! Any Questions? Slides @ www.ilia.ws Comments @ joind.in/1535 36

×