Suzanne Walker
Children’s Services Consultant
Indiana State Library
 Teens brains are wired differently than
others have been because of technology.
 Brains are more flexible than adults
...
 Stats that support the need (March 2013)
 95% use the internet
 78% have a cell and 47% of those are smart
 23% have ...
 ―It took the radio 38 years to reach 50
million people, but it took 20 for the phone
and 13 for the television. In contr...
 Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing
 How Teens Share on Social Media
 http://www.pewresearch.org/topics/
 Teen...
 Decreased blogging
 Slight increase in Facebook (93% of social
media users have an account)
 Decrease in email and inc...
Cost /But so much is free!
Cyberbullying / Combat with
Education
Isolating behavior / Being Social
and Connected
Does ...
QR Codes
Apps
Google tools
Instagram
Screenr
Aviary
Snapchat
Wordle
Vine
Tumblr
Youtube
Tagged
Twitter
What ...
 Determine the type of experience you want
with an eye toward the future
 Teen created content
 Library created content...
 Book trailers
 Posters for upcoming programs
 Games/scavenger hunts
 Video contests
 CSLP – Teen Contest
 Mash-up (...
 Facebook – questions, polls, announcements,
conversations
 QR code scavenger hunts
 Shelf Talkers with Social Media Co...
 Video creation and editing
 E-book instruction
 Presentation software instruction
 SmartBoard
 Podcasting
 Follow stuff on Twitter
 Make a Vine
 Look at Tumblr
 Pinterest boards from the Library
 Exploration in general
 What technology do you own?
 What technology would you like to access?
 What do you do with the technology you own?
 ...
 Don’t be afraid to try something new
 Learn from failures and be OPEN to
suggestions from anyone
 Create open-house ev...
 Almost impossible to predict direction or
strength of a trend
 Get to know your community
 Get to know the products
 ...
Suzanne Walker
Children’s Services Consultant
Indiana State Library
suwalker@library.in.gov
317.234-5649
Connecting Teens and Technology
Connecting Teens and Technology
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Connecting Teens and Technology

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This presentation, updated in August of 2013 was first created by Jill Stange and then edited by Suzanne Walker and attempts to identify current trends concerning teens and how they use technology. Links to research reports are included.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
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  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-and-Tech.aspx (Stats)These stats are from a variety of sources, including:Pew Internet & American Life Project reports: Teens and Mobile Phones (April 2010) and Social Media and Young Adults (PI)E-Marketer’s report College Students: The Gadget Generation, which cites a March 2011 survey done with Wakefield Research and textbook provider CourseSmart (CS)Mr Youth’s report Meet the Class of 2015 (Mr Y) researching the attidudes of 18-year olds. (Mr Y)Mobile Youth Report 2011, which defines ‘youth’ as under-30s (MY)
  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-and-Tech.aspx (Stats)These stats are from a variety of sources, including:Pew Internet & American Life Project reports: Teens and Mobile Phones (April 2010) and Social Media and Young Adults (PI)E-Marketer’s report College Students: The Gadget Generation, which cites a March 2011 survey done with Wakefield Research and textbook provider CourseSmart (CS)Mr Youth’s report Meet the Class of 2015 (Mr Y) researching the attidudes of 18-year olds. (Mr Y)Mobile Youth Report 2011, which defines ‘youth’ as under-30s (MY)
  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-and-Tech.aspx (Stats)These stats are from a variety of sources, including:Pew Internet & American Life Project reports: Teens and Mobile Phones (April 2010) and Social Media and Young Adults (PI)E-Marketer’s report College Students: The Gadget Generation, which cites a March 2011 survey done with Wakefield Research and textbook provider CourseSmart (CS)Mr Youth’s report Meet the Class of 2015 (Mr Y) researching the attidudes of 18-year olds. (Mr Y)Mobile Youth Report 2011, which defines ‘youth’ as under-30s (MY)
  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-and-Tech.aspx (Stats)These stats are from a variety of sources, including:Pew Internet & American Life Project reports: Teens and Mobile Phones (April 2010) and Social Media and Young Adults (PI)E-Marketer’s report College Students: The Gadget Generation, which cites a March 2011 survey done with Wakefield Research and textbook provider CourseSmart (CS)Mr Youth’s report Meet the Class of 2015 (Mr Y) researching the attidudes of 18-year olds. (Mr Y)Mobile Youth Report 2011, which defines ‘youth’ as under-30s (MY)
  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-and-Tech.aspx (Stats)These stats are from a variety of sources, including:Pew Internet & American Life Project reports: Teens and Mobile Phones (April 2010) and Social Media and Young Adults (PI)E-Marketer’s report College Students: The Gadget Generation, which cites a March 2011 survey done with Wakefield Research and textbook provider CourseSmart (CS)Mr Youth’s report Meet the Class of 2015 (Mr Y) researching the attidudes of 18-year olds. (Mr Y)Mobile Youth Report 2011, which defines ‘youth’ as under-30s (MY)
  • Pew is full of information and stats on internet and technology use(both teens and adult)Teens in Tech blog by a group dedicated to providing resources for young entrepreneurs
  • 1/5 of teens who have previously used FB are now leaving – most often state that they have a lack of interest in it now. “Old people are taking over.”Left blogging, leaving FB, use text and IM, see email as coming from an authority (info being pushed that requires little response or they don’t respond).
  • Some possible arguments against connecting teens to technology:1. Cost -tons of free resources out there“Children’s ability to roam has basically been destroyed,” Dr. Boyd said in her office at Microsoft, where a view of the Boston skyline is echoed in the towers of books on her shelves, desk and floor. “Letting your child out to bike around the neighborhood is seen as terrifying now, even though by all measures, life is safer for kids today.” Children naturally congregate on social media sites for the relatively unsupervised conversations, flirtations, immature humor and social exchanges that are the normal stuff of teenage hanging-out, she said.
  • QR Codes generatorApps-reviews of the latest appsGoogle Tools-everything that is out there from GoogleXtranormal-create videos by typing (free but can pay). You can choose background, actors, accents, sounds, etc.Screenr-play 1 min video that explainsAviary-photo editing (web demo)Wordle-word cloudsGlogster-interactive posters w/text graphics, music, video, etc.Tumblr-microblogging using photos, quotes, text, music, etc.YouTubeTagged-Twitter
  • Why are you doing this?What do you want to get out of it?
  • Wordle can print, put to website
  • Screenr (showing overdrive)Jaycut (video editing)
  • HEPL utilizes iTwixie in Just Be Tweens
  • Surveys can work with rewards; otherwise, get to know your teens
  • YALSA blog (Polls and other fun stuff to pull content to create content)
  • Our job is not so much to predict but to react quickly. I know that many people will say, Reaction isn’t planning or appropriate, but with the multitude of other tasks facing YA librarians today, it is hard enough to react to the trend that has just popped up; just stay flexible and prepared to jump; don’t be too hard on yourself if something doesn’t have the “success” you had hoped. Lots of factors determine the success (popularity) of an idea.Community, despite the fact of online presence, is more than just survey monkey. Know their names. Know their habits. Rush to embarrassment. Find out what you can. Google the rest.In light of the whole wanting more services from less staff, it’s vital to stay on track and keep an eye peeled for something new. Try to fit in some “professional online time.”Missions statements are the umbrella under which all programs and services should huddle AND support. Take a look at yours and determine how the new trend supports and fits under the mission statement.Arm yourself with objective reasons as to why this should be tried. Be ready to not only discuss these reasons with adult patrons and administration but with support staff as well. Teens are still usually not very welcome in the building. You can’t change that attitude overnight.
  • Connecting Teens and Technology

    1. 1. Suzanne Walker Children’s Services Consultant Indiana State Library
    2. 2.  Teens brains are wired differently than others have been because of technology.  Brains are more flexible than adults  They are able to adapt to new technologies faster than adults  They use technologies in creative ways that are different from the ways adults use technology.
    3. 3.  Stats that support the need (March 2013)  95% use the internet  78% have a cell and 47% of those are smart  23% have a tablet computer (comparable to adults)  93% have a computer or access to one at home
    4. 4.  ―It took the radio 38 years to reach 50 million people, but it took 20 for the phone and 13 for the television. In contrast, it took Facebook 3.6 years and Twitter didn’t even need that much time — in fact, it took Google Plus 88 days.‖  Teenage Brains in the Digital World by Laura Boness…Science Illustrated / Sept 13, 2012
    5. 5.  Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing  How Teens Share on Social Media  http://www.pewresearch.org/topics/  Teens Tech Habit  How Millennial are you?  Pew Internet and American Life Project  Frontline: Digital Nation  Frontline: Growing Up Online  Teens in Tech
    6. 6.  Decreased blogging  Slight increase in Facebook (93% of social media users have an account)  Decrease in email and increase in texting/instant messaging (63% text daily vs. 6% email)  Increase in YouTube  Slight increase in Twitter  Teens are early adopters of ALL forms of media/communication
    7. 7. Cost /But so much is free! Cyberbullying / Combat with Education Isolating behavior / Being Social and Connected Does not support mission / It is your mission
    8. 8. QR Codes Apps Google tools Instagram Screenr Aviary Snapchat Wordle Vine Tumblr Youtube Tagged Twitter What else?
    9. 9.  Determine the type of experience you want with an eye toward the future  Teen created content  Library created content for teen recruitment  Education  Fun
    10. 10.  Book trailers  Posters for upcoming programs  Games/scavenger hunts  Video contests  CSLP – Teen Contest  Mash-up (or all of the above!)  http://stemchallenge.org/
    11. 11.  Facebook – questions, polls, announcements, conversations  QR code scavenger hunts  Shelf Talkers with Social Media Content  Twitter games – first to retweet or first to tweet back
    12. 12.  Video creation and editing  E-book instruction  Presentation software instruction  SmartBoard  Podcasting
    13. 13.  Follow stuff on Twitter  Make a Vine  Look at Tumblr  Pinterest boards from the Library  Exploration in general
    14. 14.  What technology do you own?  What technology would you like to access?  What do you do with the technology you own?  What would you like to learn more about?
    15. 15.  Don’t be afraid to try something new  Learn from failures and be OPEN to suggestions from anyone  Create open-house events to learn  Follow YALSA blog for lots of new technology ideas
    16. 16.  Almost impossible to predict direction or strength of a trend  Get to know your community  Get to know the products  Use your mission statement  Arm yourself
    17. 17. Suzanne Walker Children’s Services Consultant Indiana State Library suwalker@library.in.gov 317.234-5649
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