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Tweeting About Testing - Zai Divecha
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Tweeting About Testing - Zai Divecha

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How under-served urban adolescents use social media to communicate about sexual health

How under-served urban adolescents use social media to communicate about sexual health

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  • The inspiration for this study came from a sweepstakes that MTV and Foursquare held last September. The contest went like this...
  • My first reaction was: “Wow. This is really cool.” It’s simple, elegant, and effective. (strenghts) Many public health interventions have used “key opinion leaders,” or popular people, to help change health behaviors, attitudes, and social norms -- like using condoms to prevent HIV. However, it got me thinking. Is this REALLY the best way to be using social media? It turns out that we don’t really know that much about how effective these kinds of programs can be. The success of such campaigns depends on how teens and young adults use social media to communicate about sexual health.
  • Explain close vs. casual difference here
  • Young urban minority adults bear a disproportionate burden of HIV and STDs. (blacks, latino, urban) Young parents are a group that are particularly at risk because the behaviors that put them at risk for pregnancy also put them at risk for HIV/STDs. Among pregnant/parenting adolescents, 29% get an incident STD during pregnancy and the postpartum period , and adolescent mothers are less likely to use condoms and are twice as likely to get an incident STD compared to nulliparous sexually active peers.4,5
  • (All questions were “check all that apply”)
  • No participants reported using Bebo, Blogger, Foursquare, Friendster, Gowalla, Habbo, LinkedIn, LiveJournal, SCVNGR, or Xanga.
  • PLATFORM: which social network is the right setting? reach a big audience, closeness of network, etc. GOALS: Changing norms vs. education vs. access to services STRUCTURE: Sharing vs. receiving info KEEPING UP TO DATE: for instnace, geolocation might take off! it was very recently that people thought urban minority kids didn’t have INTERNET access.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Tweeting about Testing How under-served urban adolescents use social media to communicate about sexual health Zai Divecha Yale School of Public Health Planned Parenthood of Southern New England
    • 2. The Inspiration...
    • 3. Background
      • Strengths of GYT-Foursquare campaign:
        • Encourages people to talk about STI testing
        • Influences norms and stigmas
      • Questions:
        • What is the best way to reach teens?
        • How do teens talk about sex through social media?
        • Are they willing to share and receive sexual health info through social media?
    • 4. Study Design
      • 94 participants recruited from CT OB/GYN clinics as part of a larger study
        • Young couples who recently had a baby
        • Females 14-21, males 14+
      • Computerized interview 6-12 ms postpartum
        • Cell phone and social media usage
        • Communication with friends about sexual health
        • Willingness to participate in social media-based sexual health programs
    • 5. Why this Population?
      • Young urban minority adults at increased risk for STIs and HIV
      • Young parents at high risk for STIs during pregnancy and postpartum period
        • 29% of pregnant and parenting teens get an STI
        • Teen mothers twice as likely to get an STI as compared to nulliparous sexually active peers
    • 6. Demographics
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9. p < .01 for all comparisons
    • 10.  
    • 11.  
    • 12.  
    • 13. Conclusions
      • Cell phones
        • Everyone has one; smartphones fairly common
      • Social media
        • Facebook
        • No geolocation
      • Communication about sexual health
        • More often with close friends than casual friends
        • Prefer in-person, phone, and text; not social media
      • Participation in social media-based programs
        • Not keen on sharing sexual health info via social media
        • Not keen on receiving sexual health info via social media
        • Prefer receiving info via text message and email
    • 14. Implications
      • Urban minority youth use smartphones and social media
      • Privacy matters
      • If we do use social media, we need to be strategic:
        • Platform
        • Goals
        • Structure of program
      • Importance of staying current
    • 15. Thank You!
      • Trace Kershaw, Ph.D.
        • PARTNRS Principal Investigator
        • Thesis advisor
      • Anna Arnold, MPH
        • PARTNRS Project Coordinator
      • Yale School of Public Health