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Sonoma County Peer Outreach Coalition

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Sonoma County Peer Outreach was presented at Sex::Tech 2011 by Shana, Jesús, Hannah, Marcos and Vanessa of Sonoma County Peer Outreach.

Sonoma County Peer Outreach was presented at Sex::Tech 2011 by Shana, Jesús, Hannah, Marcos and Vanessa of Sonoma County Peer Outreach.

Published in: Health & Medicine

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Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. OUTLINE
    • Basic overview of SCPOC and research behind the project: Shana
    • More details about the SCPOC and our methods: Jesús
    • The value of peer-led social media: Hannah
    • How mental health connects to sexual health: Marcos
    • Challenges, successes and next steps: Vanessa
  • 3. SONOMA COUNTY PEER OUTREACH COALITION
    • Mental Health Services Act- Prevention and Early Intervention program (MHSA PEI)
    • Goal: Inform Sonoma County Teens about mental health issues, promote awareness of related topics, and decrease stigma of mental illness
    • Activity: Recruit 8 teens and young adults to develop a social media project
    • By 6/30/11:
    • One Facebook page with 200 “Likes”
    • One Twitter account with 100 followers
    • Create 3 YouTube videos about teen health issues
  • 4.
    • 73% of all American teens (12 to 17) use an online social networking site
    • The average teenager (13-17) uses social media every single day for 1 hour and 50 minutes
    • 31% of all teens (12-17) search for general health, dieting, or physical fitness information
    • 17% Search for "sensitive" health information (sexual health, substance abuse, mental health)
    • 85% of “millennials” (age 18-33) search for health information online
    RESEARCH
  • 5.
    • We inform on preventative measures for a safer and healthier sexual lifestyle & relationships
    • We provide resource lists of both local and national health centers and services
    WHO WE ARE
    • We are a group of young adults and teenagers engaged in promoting understanding and awareness about mental health to our fellow peers
    • We are committed to minimizing stigma about mental health
  • 6. OUR METHODS
    • The SCPOC uses social media to reach the largest number of individuals
    • Daily Facebook and Twitter news feeds on the latest mental health and wellness info
    • Website with resource pages and links to local services
  • 7. OUR METHODS
    • Increasing our number of posts in Spanish
    • Public Service Announcements starring the Peer Leaders on YouTube and our social media sites
    • Insightful blogs provide additional information
  • 8. Teens listen to and learn the most from their peers
    • As peers, we can better relate and understand one another’s difficulties
    • We tend to feel more comfortable talking to peers than adults
  • 9. Research shows that teens will turn to their peers before talking to others
    • Teens rely on friends to get information
    • For a peer-led social media campaign, it is vital for the youth who present the information to be informed
  • 10. Social media is easy to access and spreads information
    • Social media is already frequently used as a means of communication
    • Built in tools make it easy to share information and resources with friends
  • 11. HOW DOES MENTAL HEALTH AFFECT SEXUAL HEALTH?
  • 12. RESEARCH
    • Sixth and seventh grade boys who had very low self-esteem were 1.6 times more likely to meet the criteria for drug dependence (according to the APA’s definition) nine years later than other children.
    • Youth identified with substance problems are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors, and to continue risky sexual behaviors to the extent that substance problems persist.
  • 13. RESEARCH
    • Adolescents with low self-esteem tend to report initiating sex earlier and having had risky partners. Additionally, adolescents with more emotional distress tend to have more sexual partners per year of sexual activity and a history of risky partners.
    • Self-esteem influenced subsequent unprotected sex and emotional distress influenced subsequent multiple partners.
  • 14. In order to address sexual health, we must address all the other components of the issue
  • 15. CHALLENGES
    • In the beginning, we tried to do too much all at once
    • We had to learn to be patient with attracting followers
    • Became discouraged when people didn’t “Like” our posts or comment
    • The time commitment! 
  • 16. WHAT WORKS
    • Recommending the page to our friends on Facebook
    • Commenting and sharing our posts with others (breaking the ice)
    • Monthly meetings keep everyone on track
    • “ Find us on Facebook” handouts at events 
    • In-person face-to-face networking
    • Using local media to our advantage
  • 17. WHAT’S NEXT
    • Survey to check in with our followers
    • Filming, producing and posting our final YouTube video
    • Planning for the future of the campaign
  • 18. FOLLOW US! http://www.facebook.com/scpoc http://www.twitter.com/scpoc http://www.youtube.com/thescpoc http://www.scpoc.org http://scpoc.blogspot.com/
  • 19. REFERENCES Ethier, K. A., Kershaw, T. S., Lewis, J. B., Milan, S., Niccolai, L. M., & Kovics, J. R. (2006). Self-esteem, emotional distress and sexual behavior among adolescent females: inter-relationships and temporal effects. Journal of Adolescent Health, 38 (3), 268-274. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2004.12.010 Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., & Zickhur K. (2010). Social media and young adults. Retrieved from Pew Internet Research: http://www.pewinternet.org/ Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults Smith, A. (2010). Who’s on what: social media trends among communities of color. [PowerPoint Slides] . Retrieved from: http://www.pewinternet.org/ Presentations/2011/Jan/Social-Media-Trends-Among-Communities-of- Color.aspx Tapert, S. F., Aarons, G. A., Sedlar, G. R., & Brown, S. A. (2001). Adolescent substance use and sexual risk-taking behavior. Journal of Adolescent Health, 28 (3), 181-189. Taylor J, Lloyd DA, and Warheit GJ. Self-Derogation, peer factors, and drug dependence among a multiethnic sample of young adults. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, 2006: 15 (2) 39-51.
  • 20.