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The Tech Industry's Commitment to Youth

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Seema Gururaj, the Director of Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing with the Anita Borg Institute, highlights the value, recruitment and retention of young women in the technology and …

Seema Gururaj, the Director of Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing with the Anita Borg Institute, highlights the value, recruitment and retention of young women in the technology and computer science field. Presented at YTH Live 2014 session "The Tech Industry's Commitment to Youth."

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  • 1. Tech Industry’s Commitment to Youth #YTHLive
  • 2. We envision a future where the people who imagine and build technology mirror the people and societies they build it for. Seema Gururaj Director, Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing Anita Borg Institute
  • 3. Src: Population, female (% of total) is the percentage of the population that is female. The United Nations Population Division's World Population Prospects. The Untapped Potential of the 50.8%
  • 4. MEET “JANE” YOUTH ARE THE EARLY ADOPTERS AND USERS OF NEW TECHNOLOGY
  • 5. IN FALL 2013, ABOUT 50.1 MILLION STUDENTS WILL ATTEND PUBLIC ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS. OF THESE, 35.3 MILLION WILL BE IN PREKINDERGARTEN THROUGH 8TH GRADE. FOUNDATION
  • 6. “When girls are shown images of women scientists and given a greater sense of possibility about the person they could become, the boys get the message too--"I can do this!“ “Research shows that when teachers are deliberate about taking steps to involve the female students, everyone winds up benefiting.” “Parents' support (as well as that of teachers) has been shown to be crucial to a girl's interest in science, technology, engineering and math” Source: http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=109939 What is Jane into? Girl Scouts, Toys, Science, Math, Lego Robotics, T.V, Pop culture STEREOTYPES BIASES PARENTS SUPPORT
  • 7. First-year female college students are far less likely than their male peers to plan to major in a STEM field, a pattern that is consistent across race and ethnicity. Females are expected to account for the majority of college students: about 12.5 million females will attend in fall 2013, compared with 9.3 million males Src: Association of American Colleges and Universities & Institute of Education Sciences
  • 8. STEREOTYPES BIASES BROGRAMMERS PARENTS SUPPORT ISOLATION LACK OF ROLE MODELS
  • 9. 71% INCREASED COMMITMENT TO COMPLETE CURRENT DEGREE. 85% INCREASED COMMITMENT TO TECHNOLOGY FIELD. 83% OF THOSE WHO ATTENDED FELT LESS ISOLATED. 95% FELT INSPIRED BY THE ROLE MODELS THEY SAW AT THE CONFERENCE.
  • 10. Close to 14 ABI Lean in Circles started at Universities across USA – Purdue, Texas A&M, UT Austin, Drexel University It’s important to know that you are not alone. We welcome the participation of women technologists of all ages and at any stage of their studies or careers.
  • 11. SHE IS ONE OF THE 20% OF GIRLS TO GRADUATE WITH A BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE EVEN THOUGH FEMALE GRADUATES COMPRISED 60% OF ALL BACHELOR’S DEGREES. CONGRATULATIONS “JANE”!
  • 12. 27% OF WOMEN HOLD COMPUTER SCIENCE JOBS HOW DO WE KEEP “JANE” MOTIVATED TO CONTINUE TO CREATE TECHNOLOGY?
  • 13. STEREOTYPES BIASES BROGRAMMERS ISOLATION LACK OF ROLE MODELS ORGANIZATION CULTURE
  • 14. “Geek” stereotypes have favored male over female candidates in recruiting and created a male, antisocial “geek” image that discourages women and minority students (Margolis, 2008; Ensmenger, 2010). Scarcity of role models is a challenge, especially in technical leadership roles, reducing the ability to mediate the negative effects of stereotypes and provide encouragement and mentoring (Cheryan et al., 2009). Isolation as the lone female or one of few in a class or on a team and lack of access to influential social networks can be discouraging to women and prevent them from forming the connections that matter to professional advancement (Hewlett et al., 2008 and 2014). Persistent, unconscious bias hinders women’s hiring, retention and advancement, and condescending or unfair treatment is a key cause of turnover among women in scientific professions (Fouad and Singh, 2011). Discouraging cultures have evolved in technology that favor long work hours, assertive communication styles and competitive behaviors associated with masculine work traits. These are challenging for women who are often labeled “aggressive” if they follow cultural norms.
  • 15. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER. WHAT IS YOUR ORGANIZATION’S INNOVATION IQ?
  • 16. LET US HELP “JANE” REALIZE HER FULL POTENTIAL. WE CAN COMMIT BY HELPING “JANE” AT ANY STEP IN HER LIFE. SHARE IN THE VISION OF CREATING A FUTURE WHERE THE UNTAPPED POTENTIAL OF THE 50.8% IS FULLY REALIZED!

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