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How Youth and Technology Equal Fantastic Health and Sex Education Classes
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How Youth and Technology Equal Fantastic Health and Sex Education Classes

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This presentation focuses on a collaboration of San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco Unified School District and 21 non-profit community agencies serving youth. A big part of the …

This presentation focuses on a collaboration of San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco Unified School District and 21 non-profit community agencies serving youth. A big part of the discussion focuses on how social media can complement in classroom learning in high school.

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  • 1. 1 Really?!? We Get To Learn About THAT in School? Christopher Pepper SFUSD Health Education Teacher MrHealthTeacher.com
  • 2. Remember Sex Ed?
  • 3. 3
  • 4. 4 When we talk about sexuality education in schools, it’s often framed as “abstinence-only sex ed” vs. “comprehensive sex ed.”
  • 5. 5 “Comprehensive” is a pretty big word, and it makes me wonder:
  • 6. 6 If sex ed were truly “comprehensive,” what would it need to include?
  • 7. 7 In San Francisco, we decided to take on that question
  • 8. 8 For almost two years, a dedicated group of health care providers and educators from different organizations have worked to create a fantastic new sex ed curriculum for San Francisco high schools
  • 9. 16 We asked all these groups to bring us their best materials, and from that we created a set of lessons for use in the classroom.
  • 10. 17 We hope this curriculum will become the standard used throughout the city, and possibly a model for others.
  • 11. 18 Some of the things we were aiming for in creating our curriculum:
  • 12. 19 It should be inclusive of all genders and all types of relationships, and include lots of diversity in all examples.
  • 13. 20 Students should get a chance to practice skills, not just listen to instruction.
  • 14. 21 It should include a lot of information about loving yourself, having healthy relationships, and what “enthusiastic consent” means.
  • 15. 22 We should use the class to create a close connection between students and their nearest health clinic (and the people who work there).
  • 16. 23 So where do we start?
  • 17. 24 We start with a tour of our local clinic, which happens to be right at our school
  • 18. This is your Divider Slide
  • 19. This is your Divider Slide
  • 20. Then we begin to talk about healthy relationships
  • 21. We have a lessons on how to plan a first date
  • 22. How to deal with a break-up
  • 23. How to recognize warning signs of abuse in relationships
  • 24. And how to build a positive relationship based on honesty, equality, mutual desire and fun.
  • 25. This is your Divider Slide
  • 26. We talk about gender roles and incorporate the excellent film “Straightlaced: How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up”
  • 27. We explore LGBTQQI issues and talk about what it means to be an ally
  • 28. We thoroughly cover sexual anatomy, physiology and development
  • 29. That means talking about menstruation, masturbation, the sexual response cycle and what’s “normal”
  • 30. Of course, we also explain pregnancy and birth
  • 31. We have a panel of teen moms come talk about how challenging their lives are
  • 32. And we try to give as much “hands on” exposure to different types of birth control as we can
  • 33. No one leaves class without practicing putting on a condom
  • 34. When we talk about STIs, we cover risk reduction, how to get tested, and the facts about what these infections do in a person’s body
  • 35. Using lessons from “Positive Prevention,” we cover HIV/AIDS in depth
  • 36. We like to close this section by having an HIV-positive speaker talk to the class
  • 37. As we move toward the end of the unit, we invite peer educators to explain minor consent rights
  • 38. This is your Divider Slide
  • 39. We guide students through activities designed to help them explore the question “Are you ready for sex?”
  • 40. The final project in this unit involves using some of the great sex ed websites for teens to research questions their classmates submitted anonymously
  • 41. As we roll this curriculum out, we plan to tie the lessons to a social media/text campaign developed by YTH