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Ambient Findability

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Book review of "Ambient Findability".

Book review of "Ambient Findability".


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  • 1.
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    Book review: Ambient Findability Ambient Findability: What We Find Changes Who We Become, by Peter Morville
  • 2.
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    Summary Aimed at anyone interested in web design and information architecture, this is a wide-ranging read that challenges many of our existing ideas about how we use information.
  • 3.
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    Key ideas: findability and the long tail “ Findability precedes usability. In the alphabet and on the Web. You can't use what you can't find.” Peter Morville
  • 4.
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    Key ideas: findability Grokker Kartoo
  • 5. Add sub-heading here Key ideas: the user experience
    • Useful
    • Usable
    • Desirable
    • Findable
    • Accessible
    • Credible
    • Valuable
  • 6.
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    Key ideas: language and metadata Metadata : descriptive information used to index, arrange, file and improve access to a library or museum's resources The platypus paradox
  • 7.
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    Key ideas: language and metadata Consider for example the proceedings that we call "games". I mean board-games, card-games, ball-games, Olympic games, and so on. What is common to them all? -- Don't say: "There must be something common, or they would not be called 'games' "-but look and see whether there is anything common to all. -- For if you look at them you will not see something that is common to all, but similarities, relationships, and a whole series of them at that. To repeat: don't think, but look! Ludwig Wittgenstein
  • 8.
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    Key ideas: language and metadata  A fruit  A vegetable  A terrorist  A freedom fighter  A country  A part of China
  • 9.
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    Key ideas: folksonomies and tagging Popular links on del.icio.us Multiple objects per tag
  • 10.
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    Findability in the real world
  • 11.
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    Findability in the real world
  • 12.
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    Findability in the real world
  • 13.
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    Conclusion Easy, enjoyable read. The book could have been a lot shorter, as there is a good deal of waffle. At the same time, there are enough ideas that challenge many of the dogmas about information design that it is worth reading.