Launching a teen brand using social media

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An introduction to launching your teen brand via social media by @isabelleokane

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  • Young Teens.  The brand activity wants to target kids as they begin to break free and to express themselves. The brand wants to present them a code of behaviour that sits next to self expression and being passionate about what they believe  in. Format looks fine, try and make as visual as possible.
  • Generation Now , trend based – and trends move fastListen, add to the conversation and then engage
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/teens-more-normal-than-you-think-regarding-media-usage/http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/breaking-teen-myths/They don’t blog, or tweetFacebook, IM’ing, Texting are their key activities & they do a LOT of this.On facebook they comment on photos, update their status and watch YouTube videosThey do still watch TV, with their laptopsImplication: Large scale media partnerships are important to gain reach within this audience
  • http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/teens-more-normal-than-you-think-regarding-media-usage/http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/breaking-teen-myths/They don’t blog, or tweetFacebook, IM’ing, Texting are their key activities & they do a LOT of this.On facebook they comment on photos, update their status and watch YouTube videosThey do still watch TV, with their laptopsImplication: Large scale media partnerships are important to gain reach within this audience
  • Tommy the clown discovered by David LaChapelle who photographed and created the film Rize which brought Tommy the Clown to fameTommy built his following on grassroots level – through this inspiring alternative to gang cultureTommy the Clown lead the way in the stirring dance movement called “Clowning” and “Krumping”. He also developed this form of dance in response to the 1992 Rodney King riots.[2] He is now internationally known as the "Father of Krumping".[3]By the year 2002, there were over sixty clown crews in Los AngelesFeeling inclined to capture this movement on film, LaChapelle directed the 2005 Lions Gate Films documentary, RIZE.[5]
  • Credibility and relevancy driven by association & contextCelebrity is still a key driver of the viral effectMedia channels offer great reachAffinity brands may offer “cool” & “creative” partnership opportunities e.g. adidas urban art app – but your audience is crucial bargaining power
  • Have a clear personality/point of view/something to say – philosophy, mantra, something to provoke & drink talkabilityUsed to be “positioning” – “now it’s personality”
  • http://www.atomdigital.com/full-service-digital-marketing/case-studies/lady-gaga.htmlLady Gaga's innate ability to connect with fans has contributed greatly to her success. She maintains complete control of her Twitter account, and interacts with fans one-on-one, replying to questions and comments occasionally, and retweeting her fan's posts. Innovative Twitter initiatives such as Tweet to Win, Concert Ticket Giveaways, and Prizes to Meet Lady Gaga were instrumental in the rapid growth of her Twitter following.Lady Gaga's Facebook page was leveraged to drive the conversation with fans about upcoming shows, album release dates, and other commercial initiatives. The commercial messages were thoughtfully crafted so that they were informative, and encouraged consumption in a subtle manner that did not undermine the intimate connections between Lady Gaga and her fans. 
  • http://www.organic.com/Assets/Whitepaper_teengirls_0615%20FINAL_20110321104148.pdfTeens today are more attracted to causes than campaigns. They want to stand for something and havea say. However, they rarely want to be the first, and are instead fast followers, motivated to campaign for change and happily use the Internet as a megaphone to voice their opinions. They believe in causes and participate in movements.http://www.mobileyouth.org/post/kill-your-campaign-3-youth-marketing-strategies-that-actually-work/Values sell – teens seek out brands with a similar world view to themselveshttp://www.virginmobileusa.com/virgin-mobile-life/regeneration-past-about
  • http://www.mobileyouth.org/post/kill-your-campaign-3-youth-marketing-strategies-that-actually-work/
  • Most powerful form of engagement is real world engagement – develop a real relationship with teensTeens are socially motivated – offer them a cool, free party. They will inevitably capture content – because that is what they do – and this will become branded content. When your teen audience starts liking and commenting on these photos/videos online – you have managed to penetrate their world.What others think of them is key and in the online world they define themselves by the content they shareTheir social circles are generally smaller and more defined - long tail of influence?Give them something to talk aboutEnable them to connect with other teens
  • RESPECTGen Y are creative, savvy, altruistic and very media literate Take them seriously and give them a voiceEngage them as contributors & advocateshttp://www.marketingweek.co.uk/home/the-teen-commandments/2065514.article – give teens a voiceHe adds that while young people often use multiple channels and appear hyper-connected, teenagers are prone to feeling marginalised. By engaging with them through blogs and social networks, brands can reach out to them in their comfort zone.
  • What others think of them is key and in the online world they define themselves by the content they shareTheir social circles are generally smaller and more defined - long tail of influence?
  • What others think of them is key and in the online world they define themselves by the content they shareTheir social circles are generally smaller and more defined - long tail of influence?Give them something to talk aboutEnable them to connect with other teens
  • http://www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/about/20110222-New-Study-30-hour-famine-girl-more-likely-use-social-media-support-causes?OpenDocumentGIRLS MORE CHARITABLE?Girls More Likely Than Boys to “friend”, “like” or “follow” Charities They Support And Causes They Believe in (41 percent vs. 27 percent)Girls More Likely to Support Charities Symbolically (43 percent vs. 31 percent) And Vocally (38 percent vs. 27 percent)
  • http://www.checkfacebook.com/6 out of 10 iPod Touch users are 17 years old or younger.http://www.readwriteweb.com/mobile/2010/10/teens-still-love-texting-but-mobile-app-use-growing.phphttp://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/u-s-teen-mobile-report-calling-yesterday-texting-today-using-apps-tomorrow/TextingIM’ing (facebook)Updaing Status (facebook/tumblr)Listening to music (myspace)Watching videos (YouTube)Downloading apps (App Store)
  • Launching a teen brand using social media

    1. 1. How to launch a youth brand via social media<br />May 2010<br />By @isabelleokane<br />
    2. 2. The challenge:Introduceyour brand to young urban teens Inspireand ignite their interest Engagethem and motivate them to spread branded buzz<br />
    3. 3. Listen & uncover what is current/cool - be relevant<br />
    4. 4. TV is still good to build scale<br />Nielsen: Teens still consume TV albeit with their latptops<br />
    5. 5. But if you can break with Guerilla - kudos<br />
    6. 6. Or you could start a grassroots movement<br />Tommy the Clown invented “Clowning” which evolved into “Krumping” <br />
    7. 7. Partner with influencers for credibility & reach<br />
    8. 8. Positioning Personality<br />
    9. 9. Be authentic and transparent<br />
    10. 10. Think cause not campaign<br />Organic: Teens are more attracted to causes than campaigns. Mobileyouth: Values Sell<br />
    11. 11. And give it time<br />
    12. 12. Offline engagement is key<br />
    13. 13. Involve them & give them a voice<br />
    14. 14. Create socially relevant,cool content<br />
    15. 15. Incentivize creation & sharing<br />
    16. 16. The engagement/buzz cycle<br />Online<br />Constant communication and brand building<br />Network maintenance & building<br />Amplification of offline experiences through digital content<br />Further engagement & conversation enhance online buzz<br />Driving further interest in grassroots activity<br />Audience<br />Offline<br />Grassroots, visceral engagement & brand building<br />
    17. 17. Core principals of social media<br />Fish where the fish are<br />Be real, be present, respond in real time<br />Be part of the conversation & paint with the same brush<br />You’ve got to give to get<br />Social media doesn’t have high costs – but you need to invest TIME<br />
    18. 18. Where are teens?<br />TEXTING TEXTING TEXTING<br />
    19. 19. So how to start being social?<br />
    20. 20. 1. Follow the your audience. Learn to speak their language and what interests them. Inform your business and communications.<br />
    21. 21. 2. Join the conversation – start publishing– be as authentic as possible & add value.<br />
    22. 22. 3. Build a reciprocal network of partners, friends& followers<br />
    23. 23. 4. Feed your networks wherever they are with various content streams.<br />
    24. 24. 5. Share the now, publish consistantly<br />
    25. 25. 6. Host experiential events to build the brand, foundational relationships, create content and drive traffic to your online communities<br />
    26. 26. 7. Engage & involve your partners and followers to build trust, relevance and mutually beneficial relationships<br />
    27. 27. You are now a social animal<br />

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