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Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation
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Easy Ways To Teach Pronunciation

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Adaptable pronunciation methodology presentation for different levels of teachers.

Adaptable pronunciation methodology presentation for different levels of teachers.

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  • 1. Easy Ways to Teach Pronunciation Erin Lowry TEFL Certificate Course May 23, 2009 1
  • 2. 2
  • 3. 3
  • 4. Companion Website  http://colombotech.pbwiki.com/E 4
  • 5. Parts of Pronunciation  Sounds (i.e. phones or phonemes)  Stress and rhythm  Intonation 5
  • 6. Phonemes  Smallest unit of sound that has meaning  Represent various sounds that consonants and vowels, or combinations, can create  Written with phonetic symbols ◦ Here we’ll use IP A , the International Phonetic Alphabet 6
  • 7. Why Know IPA?  English wouldn’t be a good system to use! Just compare heart, beard, and heard, Dies and diet, lord and word, Sword and sward, retain and Britain. (Mind the latter, how it's written.) Now I surely will not plague you With such words as plaque and ague. But be careful how you speak: Say break and steak, but bleak and 7
  • 8. The IPA 8
  • 9. The IPA 9
  • 10. Ways of Teaching  S e g m e n t a ls are isolated sounds (consonants, vowels, diphthongs) ◦ However, sounds are rarely produced in isolation  Students need to become aware of s u p r a s e g m e n t a ls , i.e., features of speech like stress, intonation, rhythm and linking 10
  • 11. Phonemic Symbols vs. Alphabet  1 phonemic  1 letter may = more symbol = than 1 phoneme only1phoneme  Letter “a” = ◦ /æ/ (hat)  / i :/ ◦ /eɪ/ (made)  / ɑɪ / ◦ /ə/ (usually)  /ɜ/ 11
  • 12. Why phonemic symbols?  Alphabet used to write English has 2 6 letters  British English has 4 4 sounds  English spelling is not a reliable guide to pronunciation because: ◦ Some letters have more than one sound ◦ Sometimes letters are not pronounced at all ◦ The same sound may be represented by different letters ◦ Sometimes syllables indicated by the spelling are not pronounced at all 12
  • 13. Phonemic Script  Example: Phoneme = p ◦ pen /pen/ ◦ pig /pɪg/ ◦ pencil /'pənsel/ 13
  • 14. Common Vowel Problems (Spanish)  /i:/ vs. /ɪ/  /æ/ vs. /ɑ:/ vs. /Λ/  /ɔ:/ vs. /Þ/  /ʊ/ vs. /u:/ 14
  • 15. Common Consonant Problems (Spanish)  Word-Initial Position ◦ /p/ vs. /b/ ◦ /t/ vs. /d/ ◦ /k/ vs. /g/  Word-Final Position ◦ /b/ vs. /p/ ◦ /d/ vs. /t/ ◦ /j/ vs. /d ◦ /m/ vs. /n/ vs. /ŋ/ ◦ / 15
  • 16. Vowel Sounds  Which phonemes represent: ◦ Short vowels? ◦ Long vowels? ◦ Diphthongs? 16
  • 17. Vowels 17
  • 18. Vowel Activity 18
  • 19. Activity  How would you teach a student who had difficulty with the following words? bead beat  How about these? lee’s lease 19
  • 20. Activities  Minimal pair drills: (listening and speaking) ◦ Individually ◦ In sentences ◦ In sequences  Repetition of specific sounds: ◦ sheep, she, usher, flashed, bush, rush ◦ Tongue Twisters (i.e. Peter Piper, How much wood)  Tape recorder 20
  • 21. Activity  Write down your phone number. (It may 1 bat help if you translate it using this code. 2 bait 3 bet  Find a partner and dictate your coded phone number to him or her. Please go 4 beat slowly! 5 bit 6 bite  Check to see if the numbers are correct. 7 bot  Switch and try again. 8 boat (Dalton, 1997) 9 but 0 boot 21
  • 22. Diphthongs  A combination of two vowel sounds ◦ /ay/ /aɪ/ (IPA)  Boy ◦ /aw/ /aʊ/ (IPA)  How ◦ /ɔy/ /ɔɪ/ (IPA)  Time 22
  • 23. Word-level Stress  Circle the number of the syllable that receives the most stress in each group. 1 - 2 - 3 1 - 2 - 3 embarrassed president dictation envelope eraser holiday pajamas beautiful banana bicycle 23
  • 24. Rhythm  English is stress-timed (Spanish is syllable-timed) Example: The p r e sident is in terested in eliminating the emb a r go. D e a d m e a n w e a r p la id . (Brown, 2001) 24
  • 25. Activities  Listen for tense, number of words, etc. in sentences at natural speed.  Jazz Chants Examples: Hi! How are you? I’m fine; how are you? What do you wear on your head? A hat. What do you wear on your hands? Gloves. What do you wear on your feet? Socks. Shoes and socks, shoes and socks. (by Carolyn Graham) 25
  • 26. Activity  Choose a partner. One person should be facing away from the Powerpoint.  The person facing the Powerpoint should read the questions.  The person facing away from the Powerpoint should answer them in the form of “No, I…”  Then, the partners should switch positions. New questions will be given. 26
  • 27. Person 1  You have two sisters, don’t you?  You work in a school, right?  Don’t you have a red pen?  Is that your new car? 27
  • 28. Person 2  You have two sisters, don’t you?  You work in a school, right?  Don’t you have a red pen?  Is that your new car? 28
  • 29. Content / Information Function Words Words  Often stressed  Usually unstressed ◦ Nouns ◦ Articles ◦ Auxiliary verbs ◦ Main verbs ◦ Personal pronouns ◦ Adjectives ◦ Possessive adjectives ◦ Possessive pronouns ◦ Demonstrative adjectives ◦ Demonstrative ◦ Prepositions pronouns ◦ Conjunctions ◦ Adverbs ◦ Interrogatives 29
  • 30. C ATS C H AS E M IC E Th e C ATS ha ve C H AS ED M IC E Th e C ATS w ill C H AS E t h e M IC E Th e C ATS ha ve be e n C H A S in g t h e M IC E Th e C ATS c o u ld h a v e b e e n 30
  • 31. Connected Speech  All words join to make a connected stream of sounds  Characteristics of connected speech that helps keep rhythm regular: ◦ Sentence stress ◦ Contractions ◦ Shortening of vowels in unstressed words and syllables 31
  • 32. Intonation  Change of level of voice ◦ 4 levels in English (extra high, high, medium, low)  Used to: ◦ Express emotions and attitudes ◦ Emphasize or lessen certain things we say ◦ Make it clear to others the function of what we are saying 32
  • 33. Intonation Patterns  Rising-Falling ◦ Declarative sentences ◦ WH- questions ◦ Commands  Rising ◦ Yes/no questions ◦ Open-choice alternative questions 33
  • 34. Intonation Patterns 4 EXTRA HIGH 3 HIGH re d 2 MID J o a n is w e a r in g to - 1 LOW d a y. 34
  • 35. Authentic Materials  Limericks ◦ There was an old man of Peru ◦ Who dreamed he was eating his shoe ◦ He awoke in the night ◦ In a terrible fright ◦ And found it was perfectly true! 35
  • 36. Authentic Materials  Jazz chants  Rhymes ◦ Eeny, meeny, miny, moe ◦ Catch a tiger by the toe ◦ If he hollers let him go ◦ Eenie, meeny, miny, moe 36
  • 37. Ea rs H e a r Whistles toot, Flies buzz, Bells clang. Motors roar. Doors slam: Bang! Bang! Kettles hiss, Kids shout, People snore. Clocks ding. Dogs bark, Babies cry, Birds cheep. Phones ring. Autos honk: Beep! Beep! Balls bounce, Winds sigh, Spoons drop. Shoes squeak. People scream: Stop! Stop Trucks honk, 37 Floors creak. -Lucia M. & James L. Hymes Jr.
  • 38. What Can You Do?  Find authentic resources  Include pronunciation in lesson planning  Teach pronunciation communicatively  Practice your own pronunciation 38
  • 39. Questions?  Erin Lowry ◦ erin.lowry@gmail.com  Workshop wiki ◦ http://colombotech.pbwiki.com 39

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