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Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC
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Emerging Scholarship: Reimagining the Cinematic Arts at USC

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A brief overview of infrastructure building in support of emerging scholarship at the USC School of Cinematic Arts

A brief overview of infrastructure building in support of emerging scholarship at the USC School of Cinematic Arts

Published in: Education
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  • Announcing [in]Transition
    Cinema Journal and MediaCommons will soon announce the launch of the first peer-reviewed academic journal of videographic film and moving image studies. The journal, [in]Transition, will unveil its inaugural issue at next week’s annual Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Seattle, Washington. The journal will be formally launched and discussed (amongst other topics) at the “Visualizing Media Studies:  The Expansion of Scholarly Publishing into Video Essays” workshop on Thursday, March 20th (Session E14).
    [in]Transition will provide a forum for a range of digital scholarship (which includes such formats as the video essay and the visual essay) and will also create a context for understanding and evaluating videographic work as a new mode of scholarly writing for the disciplines of cinema and media studies and related fields. This goal will be achieved through editorial curating of exemplary videographic works, through critical analysis and appreciation, and through a system of pre-publication peer review and Open Peer Commentary."
    [in]Transition will be co-edited by Catherine Grant (University of Sussex), Christian Keathley (Middlebury College), and Drew Morton (Texas A&M University-Texarkana) and managed by Christine Becker (Cinema Journal) and Jason Mittell (MediaCommons).
  • Film Art was the first introductory film textbook to use frame enlargements rather than publicity photographs as illustrations. Other textbooks have since imitated this approach, since it’s a vital tool when teaching students to analyze films. Nevertheless, even whole pages full of frames can’t fully convey the effects of techniques such as camera movement, graphic matches, staging in depth, and sound. The next logical step would be to use examples with scenes from movies, adding graphics and voiceover commentaries to clarify the points being made.Problems of clearing rights and questions concerning the limits of fair use have made it difficult for textbook authors to supply adequate, high-quality moving-image examples on DVDs or online. The Criterion Collection has allowed us to make this big next step. (From David Bordwell’s blog March 16, 2012)
  • laser discs, CD ROMs –Criterion Collection began with Citizen Kane and King Kong – Kong had the first audio commentary
    Enhancement to the original vs. a new and different work of criticism
    As a side note, in the 90s Stein also created a platform for electronic publishing called TK3, which was to become the ill-fated platform called Sophie which received multiple years of funding from the Mellon Foundation
    1990s: Bob Stein’s Vision
    Voyager: Expanded books- CD-ROM texts that offered all kinds of digital functionality
    founded a company Night Kitchen: TK3- the precursor to Sophie and was designed to easily bring together text, images, audio and video.
    Institute for the Future of the Book: Sophie- goal was nothing less than to reimagine publishing in a digital era
    2000’s: Mellon Foundation Support: funded Sophie with three grants
    Along with the MacArthur Foundation (2007) Mellon was intrigued with its potential for supporting emerging forms of scholarly communication and for possibly restructure academic publishing in a digital era
    The most recent grant- 2008 USC partnered with Astea Solutions in Sofia, Bulgaria to develop Sophie 2.0
    Why USC? Mellon stipulated that Sophie, with it’s academic potential, needed an academic partner
    -- Bob Stein has had a long relationship with USC, both at SCA and the former Annenberg Center where he was a fellow
    -- I have been working closely with Holly and the IML in a coordinating capacity
    -- Holly has been working closely with Astea Solutions’ development team.
    -- IML’s role has been to test the software with faculty and students, and initiate outreach efforts
    2010
    Launch Sophie 2.0 and build open source community
  • Marsha Kinder’s Labyrinth Project at USC
  • Shift from design to information architecture
    http://vectors.usc.edu/issues/05_issue/nationonthemove/prjindex/
  • From one-off projects to more scalable authoring platform
  • Where Scalar lowered technological barriers to authoring; Critical Commons aimed to lower legal barriers via fair use advocacy
  • Critical Commons is also now part of the backend architecture of a number of publishing projects
    basically the system is that you upload a full-resolution clip to Critical Commons, it transcodes a web-viewable version that anyone can watch or embed, then it allows members of its Advanced User community to download the original, full-resolution video.
    Registered users can add commentaries that are either text or voice-over, they can create play-lists, publish and most importantly, they can take the embed code generated by the system and recirculate any video in other web contexts
  • While designing Virtual Window Interactive, Friedberg and Stein also proposed the iMAP PhD program
  • Transcript

    • 1. Reinventing Cinematic Arts Media Arts + Practice Orientation 8.22.14
    • 2. Catherine Grant, Christian Keathley, Drew Morton (2014) “first peer-reviewed academic journal of videographic film and moving image studies”
    • 3. Bordwell and Thompson, Film Art (1977) 1st edition “first introductory film textbook” to include frame enlargements
    • 4. The Voyager Company (1984- 97) “a film school in a box” The Criterion Collection Institute for the Future of the Book Sophie (2000 - 2010) Night Kitchen | TK3 1997-2000 Bob Stein
    • 5. Marsha Kinder, Blood Cinema (1993) first cinema studies book to include media supplement (CD ROM) Labyrinth | Yuri Tsivian Immaterial Bodies (1999) First Labyrinth CD ROM
    • 6. Marsha Kinder | Labyrinth Research Initiative on Interactive Narrative
    • 7. iMAP incubator Kristy Kang, Rosemary Comella, Juri Hwang + Steve Anderson, Andreas Kratky
    • 8. Interactive Frictions | 1999
    • 9. Transmedia Frictions | 2014
    • 10. Race in Digital Space | 2000
    • 11. Scott Fisher, et al | Zemeckis Media Lab | 2003-2010 experimental pedagogical spaces: backchannel; Google-jockey
    • 12. Institute for Multimedia Literacy | 1997 integration of technology-enhanced research and pedagogy
    • 13. Tara McPherson, Steve Anderson | Vectors Journal | 2003 infrastructure for producing and validating emerging modes of scholarship
    • 14. Erik Loyer | Vector Space generative editorial statement experiments with design, affect, interface, publishing models
    • 15. Vectors dynamic indexing transition from design orientation to information architecture
    • 16. ANVC | Scalar | 2009 lowering technological barriers to electronic authoring
    • 17. Critical Commons | 2008 lowering legal barriers to electronic authoring
    • 18. Scalar Difference Analyzer Electronic journals
    • 19. Anne Friedberg + Erik Loyer | Virtual Window Interactive | 2007
    • 20. iMAP | 2007 Dissertation Projects A dissertation is an original contribution to current knowledge in the field and a demonstration that the Ph.D. candidate has achieved sufficient mastery in the field to pursue independent research and scholarship. A dissertation represents the individual candidate's research, writing and creative practice. Dissertation projects must achieve the highest levels of scholarly rigor and creative accomplishment within a context of critical inquiry. The precise form of the dissertation project will be determined in consultation with each student's Dissertation Committee and Chair. In keeping with the hybrid theory-practice commitment of the Media Arts and Practice program, formal parameters for the project should be defined according to the content of the student's research and the expressive needs of the project. The dissertation project may be accompanied by an associated text document or, depending on the content of the project and, with the approval of the Dissertation Committee Chair, all textual content may be fully integrated into the project. Dissertation projects must be accompanied by thorough written documentation describing the design processes and technologies, as well as the historical and theoretical foundations of the project. A justification of the project's treatment of text and other media content should be included in the project documentation. The purpose of the documentation is not to become a surrogate for the dissertation project itself, but is consistent with the need to represent and disseminate the substance of a dissertation project effectively in ways that are supplementary to its original form. In all cases, the dissertation project must constitute an original contribution to the field of study and emerging modes of scholarly expression.

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