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What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain
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What is the best over the counter treatment for back pain

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Almost everyone will experience low back pain at some point in their lives. This pain can vary from mild to severe. It can be short-lived or long-lasting. However it happens, low back pain can make …

Almost everyone will experience low back pain at some point in their lives. This pain can vary from mild to severe. It can be short-lived or long-lasting. However it happens, low back pain can make many everyday activities difficult to do.

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  • 1. What Is The Best Over the Counter Treatment For Back Pain Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to a sudden, sharp pain that leaves you incapacitated. It can come on suddenly—from an accident, a fall, or lifting something heavy—or it can develop slowly, perhaps as the result of age-related changes to the spine. Regardless of how back pain happens or how it feels, you know it when you have it. And chances are, if you don’t have back pain now, you will eventually. Almost everyone will experience low back pain at some point in their lives. This pain can vary from mild to severe. It can be short-lived or long-lasting. However it happens, low back pain can make many everyday activities difficult to do. Continue to read to learn what is the best over the counter treatment for back pain Causes of Lower Back Pain There are many causes of lower back pain. It sometimes occurs after a specific movement such as lifting or bending. Just getting older also plays a role in many back conditions. The reasons for lower back pain on the left or right side may vary from person to person, and can strike at anytime, making day-to-day chores a difficult task. Aging As we age, our spines age with us. Aging causes degenerative changes in the spine. These changes can start in our 30s — or even younger — and can make us prone to back pain, especially if we overdo our activities. Over-activity One of the more common causes of lower back pain is muscle soreness from over-activity. Muscles and ligament fibers can be overstretched or injured. Disk Injury
  • 2. Some people develop low back pain that does not go away within days. This may mean there is an injury to a disk. Disk Tear Small tears to the outer part of the disk (annulus) sometimes occur with aging. Some people with disk tears have no pain at all. Others can have pain that lasts for weeks, months, or even longer. A small number of people may develop constant pain that lasts for years and is quite disabling. Why some people have pain and others do not is not well understood. Disk Herniation Another common type of disk injury is a "slipped" or herniated disc. A disk herniates when its jelly-like center pushes against its outer ring. If the disk is very worn or injured, the nucleus may squeeze all the way through. When the herniated disk bulges out toward the spinal canal, it puts pressure on the sensitive spinal nerves, causing pain. Because a herniated disk in the low back often puts pressure on the nerve root leading to the leg and foot, pain often occurs in the buttock and down the leg. This is sciatica. A herniated disk often occurs with lifting, pulling, bending, or twisting movements. Disk Degeneration With age, intevertebral disks begin to wear away and shrink. In some cases, they may collapse completely and cause the facet joints in the vertebrae to rub against one another. Pain and stiffness result. Spinal Stenosis Spinal stenosis occurs when the space around the spinal cord narrows and puts pressure on the cord and spinal nerves. Scoliosis This is an abnormal curve of the spine that may develop in children, most often during their teenage years. It also may develop in older patients who
  • 3. have arthritis. This spinal deformity may cause back pain and possibly leg symptoms, if pressure on the nerves is involved. Additional Causes There are other causes of low back pain, some of which can be serious. If you have vascular or arterial disease, a history of cancer, or pain that is always there despite your activity level or position, you should consult your primary care doctor. Symptoms of Back Pain Back pain varies. It may be sharp or stabbing. It can be dull, achy, or feel like a "charley horse" type cramp. The type of pain you have will depend on the underlying cause of your low back pain. Most people find that reclining or lying down will improve low back pain, no matter the underlying cause. People with low back pain may experience some of the following: Bladder incontinence or sudden bowel movement Progressive weakening of the legs Continuous low back pain or abdominal pain Signs of fever and chills that are directly linked with lower back pain Extreme weight loss Recent case of trauma, especially when severe Back pain may be worse with bending and lifting. Sitting may worsen pain. Standing and walking may worsen pain Back pain comes and goes, and often follows an up and down course with good days and bad days. Pain may extend from the back into the buttock or outer hip area, but not down the leg. Sciatica is common with a herniated disk. This includes buttock and leg pain, and even numbness, tingling or weakness that goes down to the foot. It is possible to have sciatica without back pain.
  • 4. Regardless of your age or symptoms, if your back pain does not get better within a few weeks, or is associated with fever, chills, or unexpected weight loss, you should call your doctor. What Are the Risk Factors for Back Pain? Although anyone can have back pain, a number of factors increase your risk. They include: Age The first attack of low back pain typically occurs between the ages of 30 and 40. Back pain becomes more common with age. Fitness Level Back pain is more common among people who are not physically fit. Weak back and abdominal muscles may not properly support the spine. Weekend Warriors People who go out and exercise a lot after being inactive all week — are more likely to suffer painful back injuries than people who make moderate physical activity a daily habit. Studies show that low-impact aerobic exercise is good for the disks that cushion the vertebrae, the individual bones that make up the spine. Diet A diet high in calories and fat, combined with an inactive lifestyle, can lead to obesity, which can put stress on the back. Heredity Some causes of back pain, such as ankylosing spondylitis, a form of arthritis that affects the spine, have a genetic component. Race Race can be a factor in back problems. African American women, for example, are two to three times more likely than white women to develop
  • 5. spondylolisthesis, a condition in which a vertebra of the lower spine—also called the lumbar spine—slips out of place. The Presence of Other Diseases Many diseases can cause or contribute to back pain. These include various forms of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and cancers elsewhere in the body that may spread to the spine. Occupational Risk Factors Having a job that requires heavy lifting, pushing, or pulling, particularly when this involves twisting or vibrating the spine, can lead to injury and back pain. An inactive job or a desk job may also lead to or contribute to pain, especially if you have poor posture or sit all day in an uncomfortable chair. Cigarette Smoking Although smoking may not directly cause back pain, it increases your risk of developing low back pain and low back pain with sciatica. Furthermore, smoking can slow healing, prolonging pain for people who have had back injuries, back surgery, or broken bones. What Is the Difference Between Acute and Chronic Back Pain? Acute pain starts quickly and lasts less than 6 weeks. It is the most common type of back pain. Acute pain may be caused by things like falling, being tackled in football, or lifting something heavy. If you have chronic low back pain, you are not alone. Up to 85% of adults will experience back pain, including low back pain, at some point in their lives. Two percent to 10% of those who experience low back pain still report pain after three months, which makes it a chronic condition. Exercises or surgery are not usually advisable for acute back pain. Chronic pain lasts for more than 3 months and is much less common than acute pain. Treatment for chronic back pain falls into two basic categories: the kind that requires an operation and the kind that does not. In the vast majority of cases, back pain does not require surgery. Applying heat or cold
  • 6. may relieve pain, but it does not cure the cause of chronic back pain. Although exercise is usually not advisable for acute back pain, proper exercise can help ease chronic pain and perhaps reduce the risk of it returning. How Is Back Pain Treated? Treatment for back pain depends on what kind of pain you have. Acute back pain usually gets better without any treatment, but you may want to take acetaminophen, aspirin, or ibuprofen to help ease the pain. Exercise and surgery are not usually used to treat acute back pain. Following are some types of treatments for chronic back pain. Hot or Cold Packs (or Both) Hot or cold packs can soothe sore, stiff backs. Heat reduces muscle spasms and pain. Cold helps reduce swelling and numbs deep pain. Using hot or cold packs may relieve pain, but this treatment does not fix the cause of chronic back pain. Exercise Proper exercise can help ease chronic pain but should not be used for acute back pain. Your doctor or physical therapist can tell you the best types of exercise to do. Medications The following are the main types of medications used for back pain: Analgesic medications are over-the-counter drugs such as acetaminophen and aspirin or prescription pain medications. Topical analgesics are creams, ointments, and salves rubbed onto the skin over the site of pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are drugs that reduce both pain and swelling. NSAIDs include over-the-counter drugs such as ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen sodium. Your doctor may prescribe stronger NSAIDs.
  • 7. Muscle relaxants and some antidepressants may be prescribed for some types of chronic back pain, but these do not work for every type of back pain. Behavior Changes You can learn to lift, push, and pull with less stress on your back. Changing how you exercise, relax, and sleep can help lessen back pain. Eating a healthy diet and not smoking also help. Injections Your doctor may suggest steroid or numbing shots to lessen your pain. Complementary and Alternative Medical Treatments When back pain becomes chronic or when other treatments do not relieve it, some people try complementary and alternative treatments. The most common of these treatments are: Manipulation Professionals use their hands to adjust or massage the spine or nearby tissues. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) A small box over the painful area sends mild electrical pulses to nerves. Studies have shown that TENS treatments are not always effective for reducing pain. Acupuncture This Chinese practice uses thin needles to relieve pain and restore health. Acupuncture may be effective when used as a part of a comprehensive treatment plan for low back pain. Acupressure A therapist applies pressure to certain places in the body to relieve pain. Acupressure has not been well studied for back pain.
  • 8. Surgical Treatment Surgery for low back pain should only be considered when nonsurgical treatment options have been tried and have failed. It is best to try nonsurgical options for 6 months to a year before considering surgery. You may need surgery if you have herniated disk, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, vertebral fractures or degenerative disk disease. Rarely, when back pain is caused by a tumor, an infection, or a nerve root problem called cauda equina syndrome, surgery is needed right away to ease the pain and prevent more problems. How to Get Rid of Lower Back Pain It may not be possible to prevent low back pain. We cannot avoid the normal wear and tear on our spines that goes along with aging. But there are many tips and remedies on how to get rid of lower back pain problems. Having a healthy lifestyle is a good start. One of the best things you can do to get rid of back pain is to exercise regularly and keep your back muscles strong. Healthy Diet Eating a healthy diet also is important. To keep your spine strong, as with all bones, you need to get enough calcium and vitamin D every day. These nutrients help prevent osteoporosis, which is responsible for a lot of the bone fractures that lead to back pain. Calcium is found in dairy products; green, leafy vegetables; and fortified products, like orange juice. Your skin makes vitamin D when you are in the sun. If you are not outside much, you can obtain vitamin D from your diet: nearly all milk and some other foods are fortified with this nutrient. Most adults don’t get enough calcium and vitamin D, so talk to your doctor about how much you need per day, and consider taking a nutritional supplement or a multivitamin. Exercise to Lower Back Pain Combine aerobic exercise, like walking or swimming, with specific exercises to keep the muscles in your back and abdomen strong and flexible. Exercise is a great way to get rid of lower back pain. But if you’ve been inactive for a
  • 9. while, start slowly. Begin with a low-impact exercise such as walking, stationary biking, or swimming for about 30 minutes a day. Adding gentle stretching or yoga may also help your muscles. Ask your doctor what types of exercise are best for you. Exercises for lower back pain help in relieving pain. The lower back pain exercises are simple and can also be done at home. There are some exercises to avoid with lower back pain. These include hip twists, hurdlers stretch, sit ups with legs extended. Before you do any of the lower back pain exercises, it is important, that you do some warm up exercises. Lower back pain can be cured and even prevented with some basic back exercises. Proper Lifting Be sure to lift heavy items with your legs, not your back. Do not bend over to pick something up. Keep your back straight and bend at your knees. Maintain Your Weight Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight puts added stress on your lower back. Carrying extra weight on your body means more work for your lower back muscles. This is especially true if the extra pounds are around your waist. The heavier you are, the more impact there is on your back with each step. Losing weight can also help protect the muscles and joints in your knees and hips. Avoid Smoking Both the smoke and the nicotine cause your spine to age faster than normal. Proper Posture Good posture is important for avoiding future problems. A therapist can teach you how to safely stand, sit, and lift. Sit in chairs with straight backs or low-back support. Keep your knees a little higher than your hips. Adjust the seat or use a low stool to prop up your feet. Turn by moving your whole body rather than by twisting at your waist.
  • 10. When driving, sit straight and move the seat forward. This helps you not lean forward to reach the controls. You may want to put a small pillow or rolled towel behind your lower back if you must drive or sit for a long time. If you must stand for long periods, rest 1 foot on a low stool to relieve pressure on your lower back. Every 5 to 15 minutes, switch the foot you're resting on the stool. Maintain good posture: Keep your ears, shoulders and hips in a straight line, with your head up and your stomach pulled in. Push With Care Activities that require pushing, such as vacuuming, using a stroller, and mowing the lawn can strain your lower back. Again, keep your elbows as close to your trunk as possible. Don’t push with straight arms, Rao recommends. Choosing a lightweight stroller or vacuum can also help. If the activity still feels like too much, try doing a little at a time. Sleeping Position The best way to sleep is on your side with your knees bent. You may put a pillow under your head to support your neck. You may also put a pillow between your knees. If you sleep on your back, put pillows under your knees and a small pillow under your lower back. Don't sleep on your stomach unless you put a pillow under your hips. Use a firm mattress. If your mattress is too soft, use a board of 1/2-inch plywood under the mattress to add support. Know What Exercises to Avoid If you’ve had a back injury or are dealing with certain back conditions, there may be some exercises that you shouldn’t do at all until your doctor gives approval. These may include contact sports, racket sports, golf, weight lifting, dancing, jogging, and sit-ups. Your doctor may also advise against doing leg lifts while lying on your stomach. Ask your doctor about any other specific exercises you should avoid. Take a Break
  • 11. If you do a lot of sitting or standing during the day, take a break every so often to move around. Just a short walk around the house or office can help relieve tight joints and muscles. You can also try doing some gentle stretches. When a break isn’t possible, make sure to change your position occasionally. What Is The Best Over The Counter Treatment for Back Pain Almost everyone will experience low back pain at some point in their lives. This pain can vary from mild to severe. It can be short-lived or long-lasting. However it happens, low back pain can make many everyday activities difficult to do. Back pain affects millions of people worldwide, whether it's acute or chronic, lower middle or upper back pain. There can be multiple contributing factors, including stress and injury, and many people look to nonprescription drugs for short-term relief. There are many over the counter treatments available for back pain and some time it becomes difficult to identify what is the best over the counter treatment for back pain, so proper research should be done in the said regard. As a concluding note, we can say that although back pain is one of the most common and growing health conditions in the world today, it can be prevented to a great extent by following a proper lifestyle, and eating and sleeping habits. Click Here to Know What Is The Best Over The Counter Treatment For Back Pain

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