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Digital Inclusion in the UK - From Desktop Computers to Mobile Phone Apps for Social Change
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Digital Inclusion in the UK - From Desktop Computers to Mobile Phone Apps for Social Change

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After months of research and interviews the Centre for Digital Inclusion (CDI) recently finished its study of digital inclusion & community engagement in the UK. In this presentation we share our …

After months of research and interviews the Centre for Digital Inclusion (CDI) recently finished its study of digital inclusion & community engagement in the UK. In this presentation we share our results and present our vision and plans for the future:
To enable people in low-income communities to use, design and develop mobile apps for social change and community action.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology

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  • 1.
  • 2. Centre for Digital Inclusion
    Transforming lives through technology, education and citizenship
    Contributing to a Digital Britain
    From desktop computers to mobile phone apps for social change
  • 3. Agenda
    CDI
    Digital Inclusion in the UK
    UK Pilot Programme
    1
    2
    3
  • 4. One of the leading social enterprises in the world
    Who we are
    • Founded in 1995 by Rodrigo Baggio
    • 5. Pioneer of digital inclusion in emerging economies
    • 6. 753 CDI Communities in 12 countries
    • 7. 1,250,000 youth and adults trained
    • 8. 2,000 educators trained
    • 9. More than 60 international awards including Ashoka, Avina, Clinton Global Initiative, IDB, Schwab Foundation, SkollFoundation, Time Magazine, Unicef, Unesco
    CDI global operations
    Full operations
    Institutional development
  • 10. Large scale impact in deprived communities
    Our impact
    1,250,000 youth and adults
    Profile *
    65% between 10 and 18 years
    56% are women
    63% have no source of income
    Outcomes+
    78% improved understanding of local community
    75% improved reading and writing skills
    47% found a new job
    34% increased their income
    23% re-enrolled in formal education
    12% opened their own business
    * Based on CDI impact monitoring system
    All based on data by INGAP (2006 & 2007) and Fonte Institute (2007)
  • 11. 3 core elements of success
    What we have
    Learn by solving social problems (informal education)
    • Develop agents of change in communities through 5-step methodology inspired by critical pedagogy (Paulo Freire)
    Work with local partners
    • Thorough due diligence process of partners
    • 12. Local innovation and delivery; but central quality management, support and evaluation across network
    Sustainable business model
    • CDI Community as a local point of reference (no hands-out approach, enterprise and services)
  • CDI’s 5-step methodology framework
    Beyond pure technical skills
    Step 4
    Step 5
    Step 2
    Step 3
    Step 1
    Solution delivery
    Impact assessment
    Community analysis
    Problem definition
    Solution design
    “Read the world”
    “Research data”
    “Plan action”
    “Take action”
    “Evaluate path taken”
  • 13. How can CDI contribute to a Digital Britain, in order to be:
    Our challenge in UK
    • Innovative
    • 14. Inspiring
    • 15. Inline with UK leadership position on digital inclusion & technology
    • 16. Not duplicating, but learning from & complementing existing work
    • 17. Helping to build Digital Britain of the future
  • UK Internet adoption far ahead of other CDI countries
    Internet penetration (2008)
    % of population
    Source: Internet World Stats 2009
    Internet penetration benchmark
  • 18. Unemployment is rising among young people
    Economic challenges in the UK
    Jobless aged 18-24 (02/09)
    • A growing challenge:
    • 19. 928,000 under-25s unemployed in 06/09 (700,000 in 02/08)
    • 20. 19.1% 16 -24 year olds seeking work compared to 7.8% adults
    • 21. 31.7% 16-17 year old school leavers officially unemployed
    • 22. Autumn 2009: 300,000 new graduates & 400,000 school leavers need to find work
    • 23. Unemployment in early work years has important long-term effect on self-esteem and earnings
    Source: BBC 2009, UK government employment statistics June 2009
  • 24. Deprivation has an impact on aspirations of young people
    Education challenges
    Young people’s beliefs in abilities
    • Communities and social context matter:
    • 25. Young people in deprived areas tend to have lower educational aspirations
    • 26. Aspirations are linked to sources of inspiration – who you know and your knowledge of what’s out there
    • 27. Lack of role models and opportunities
    Abilities belief scale measured at ages 8 / 13
    Points
    Source: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents And Children by Indices of Multiple Deprivation published by Cabinet Office December 2008
  • 28. Agenda
    CDI
    Digital Inclusion in the UK
    UK Pilot Programme
    1
    2
    3
  • 29. CDI’s learning plan about the digital inclusion landscape
    What did we do
    45 interviews
    • experts in digital inclusion, youth, entrepreneurship, community & social media, community development & regeneration, informal learning and citizenship education
    9site visits
    • UK Online Centres and community organisations in London (Hackney, Lambeth, Victoria), Nottingham, Shipley, Manchester, Cambridgeshire, Black Country and Birmingham
    2 informal discussion groups
    • young unemployed people in Hackney and Southampton
  • Definition
    Digital Inclusion means different things to different people:
    giving people the basic ICT skills to participate in the knowledge economy
    closing the Digital Divide
    making technology & electronic services accessible for disabled & elderly
    giving people broadband Internet access
    preventing economic exclusion from electronic commercial & public services
    preventing social exclusion from digitally connected communities
    using any digital technology to tackle social exclusion
    using any digital technology in communities to tackle area-based deprivation
    “The use of technology either directly or indirectly to improve the lives and life chances of disadvantaged people and the places in which they live”
    (Digital Inclusion Team)
  • 30. Timeline
    A decade of policy initiatives
    2009
    Informal Adult Learning whitepaper (DIUS) & Informal Learning Transformation Fund
    1998-2003
    Tools for schools & capital modernisation fund (Big Lottery)
    1999-2004
    Office of the e-Envoy (Cabinet office)
    2004-2007
    E-Government Unit (Cabinet office)
    2007
    Digital Challenge DC10+ Network
    (CLG)
    2008
    Minister for Digital Inclusion (Cabinet)
    2009
    Digital Britain report (BERR/DCMS)
    2000
    UK Online Centres created (DfES)
    2000-2003
    Wired-up Communities (DfES)
    Computers Within Reach
    2005
    Inclusion through Innovation & Digital Strategy
    (Cabinet Office/ DTI)
    2008
    Digital Inclusion Action Plan Consultation (CLG)
    2009
    Martha Lane Fox appointed
    Digital Champion
    2006
    Digital Inclusion Team
    2008
    Communities in Control Whitepaper & Digital Mentors Programme (CLG)
    2009
    Aspirations & attainment in deprived communities Whitepaper (CO, DCSF, CLG)
    • £5 billion invested in formal & informal educational ICT infrastructure 1997-2007
    • 31. School pupils per computer in 2007 - 6:1 in primary & 3.6:1 in secondary education
  • % of adults, Great Britain
    % of adults, Great Britain
    Source: Office of National Statistics 2008
    Adults who have never used Internet
    Internet access & educational qualification
    Internet usage UK
    A glass half full or half empty?
    % of adults, Great Britain
    % of adults, Great Britain
  • 32. % of non-Internet users
    Reasons of household for no Internet
    Internet non-usage UK
    Lack of interest and no need are becoming more important
    Internet adoption is flattening out and non-users are late or non-adopters
    Source: Office of National Statistics 2008
  • 33. UK consumer-only smartphone sales
    New technology trends
    Mobile Internet and mobile application usage are major areas of growth
    • Mobile broadband sales grew from 76,000 in 02/08 to 263,000 in 05/09
    • 34. Q1 ’09: 8 million people accessed the Internet via their mobile phones compared to 5.7 million in Q1 ’08
    • 35. Increasing take-up of smartphones drives mobile Internet usage
    • 36. Smartphones defined by Ofcom as handset running an full operating system (e.g. Symbian, Android, iPhone)
    Source: Ofcom The Communications Market Report 2009
  • 37. Digital Inclusion value chain
    Successful digital inclusion players adapt and expand into new areas
    Safety & security
    Computer recycling
    & procurement
    Basic IT skills
    Access to IT
    IT outsourcing & data base design
    IT maintenance & support
    Internet cafe
    & printing services
    Programming & advanced skills
    Website design
    & other services
    Digital media skills
    High value offer in UK
    1999-2000
    2001-2003
    2003-2005
    2006-2009
    • Wired-up communities
    • 38. Community networks
    Examples of initiatives
    Current economic value
  • 47. CDI focus vs. UK market focus
    Most of CDI’s existing activities are no longer priority areas for the UK
    Safety & security
    Computer recycling
    & procurement
    CDI
    • Focus on access, basic skills & recycling
    • 48. Expansion into services, maintenance & support
    Basic IT skills
    Access to IT
    IT outsourcing & data base design
    IT maintenance & support
    Internet cafe
    & printing services
    Programming & advanced skills
    Website design
    & other services
    Digital media skills
    Safety & security
    Computer recycling
    & procurement
    Basic IT skills
    Access to IT
    UK market
    • Focus on programming skills and digital media
    • 49. Decline of recycling, Internet cafes & support
    IT outsourcing & data base design
    IT maintenance & support
    Internet cafe
    & printing services
    Programming & advanced skills
    Website design
    & other services
    Digital media skills
    Heavy focus
    Medium focus
    Low focus
    Very low or no focus
  • 50. The next bounce of the ball?
    New technologies will expand the digital inclusion value chain further
    Safety & security
    Computer recycling
    & procurement
    Basic IT skills
    Access to IT
    Universal high-speed broadband
    IT outsourcing & data base design
    ?
    IT maintenance & support
    Internet cafe
    & printing services
    Programming & advanced skills
    Mobile Internet skills
    Website design
    & other services
    Digital media skills
    2010-?
    1999-2000
    2001-2003
    2003-2005
    2006-2009
    Mobile Internet skills will be more important as mobile Internet and smartphone markets grow
    Fixed broadband is likely to become seen as an essential utility with universal access
  • 51. Digital inclusion & Social Change Theory
    Different theories of social change used for digital inclusion
    Learn social entrepreneurship
    Support social entrepreneurs
    No explicit social focus
    Document social issues
    Activities
    • None
    • 52. Sole focus on learning technical skills
    • 53. “Give people a voice”
    • 54. Train people to express their thoughts and to document their life realities
    • 55. Identify people who are already involved in community
    • 56. Teach them to use technology, so they can be more effective
    • 57. Structured process to make people conscious of their environment
    • 58. Train people in social mobilisation
    Theory of social change
    • New voices will attract attention and other people will act
    • 59. Existing community activists achieve more social change
    • 60. New networks are created in community and people become social entrepreneurs
    • 61. None
    • 62. Only individual
    Issues
    • No social change
    • 63. Tech skills irrelevant to people
    • 64. Unclear link between voice and action
    • 65. No new people
    • 66. Small target market
    • 67. People might not want to become active in community
  • Competitive Map by Social Change Theory
    Social entrepreneurship learning program as gap in digital inclusion field
    Talk About Local
    Citizens Online
    Moving IT Forward
    We Share Stuff
    People’s Voice Media
    Social by Social
    UK Online Centres
    Podnosh
    ELATT
    CDI
    CMA
    IT in schools
    UK Villages
    Cambridge Archive Network
    Learn social entrepreneurship
    Support social entrepreneurs
    No explicit social focus
    Document social issues
    CDI’s 5-step pedagogy enables people to achieve social change in their communities is unique in the UK and offers an opportunity
  • 68. CDI mobile addresses technology and social change gap in UK market
    Technology & Social Change Matrix
    CDI Mobile
    Fix My Street
    Mobile Internet skills
    Handheld learning in schools
    We Share Stuff
    People’s Voice Media
    Talk About Local
    CDI 2.0
    Social & digital media skills
    Social by Social
    Podnosh
    CMA
    UK Villages
    Moving IT Forward
    IT in schools
    Cambridge Archive Network
    CDI 1.0
    ELATT
    IT & Internet skills
    UK Online Centres
    Citizens Online
    No explicit social focus
    Document social issues
    Support social entrepreneurs
    Learn social entrepreneurship
    CDI has the opportunity to become a market leader in the emerging mobile Internet space and to expand the concept of digital inclusion further
  • 69. Agenda
    CDI
    Digital Inclusion in the UK
    UK Pilot Programme
    1
    2
    3
  • 70. Income through services
    Up-to date skills
    Valuable to community partners
    Technology pull
    Technology attractive to CDI students
    CDI’s core target group: young people
    Criteria for pilot program options
    Based on the historical success of CDI’s model in Latin America
    Community partners and students have potential to earn additional income
    Clear benefits for partners to engage
    Access to expensive technology
    Contacts to companies or new resources
    Offers students leading skills to leap-frog into education, employment, entrepreneurship
    CDI’s successful model can only be replicated when all of these criteria are fulfilled
  • 71. What technologies are attractive to young people in deprived communities?
    Sources of inspiration
    • Smartphones: iPhone, Blackberry Storm, etc.
    • 72. GPS systems
    • 73. iPod and music players
    • 74. Gaming consoles: PSP, Xbox360, Wii
  • Expand CDI approach from desktop computers to smartphones
    Our vision
    “Enable people in low-income communities to use, design and develop mobile apps for social change and community action”
    “Apps For Good”
  • 75. Example of civic-minded iPhone app
    Nascent, but growing
    • FixMyStreet iPhone app developed by MySociety/ UK:
    • 76. Report local problems (graffiti, broken street lightning)
    • 77. Record problems with iPhone, using camera and GPS & submit to local council
    • 78. Create network of citizens interested in community problems
  • Three elements will be required for CDI’ s new operating model in the UK
    Operating approach
    • People come to IT-experienced community partners in deprived areas
    • 79. Community orgs select CDI students
    1
    2
    • CDI students get high-end mobile phones as part of the programme (monthly fee or volunteering)
    3
    • 4-month CDI Mobile course working as a small team with educator on social issue while learning technology skills
    • 80. Mobile app for social change used, designed and developed
  • Upgrading CDI framework to UK education and skills context
    Beyond pure technical skills
    Step 4
    Step 5
    Step 2
    Step 3
    Step 1
    Solution delivery
    Impact assessment
    Community analysis
    Problem definition
    Solution design
    “Read the world”
    “Research data”
    “Plan action”
    “Take action”
    “Evaluate path taken”
    Skills
    Creative & design,
    planning
    Analysis
    & research
    Technical
    (IT & mobile)
    Communication & mobilisation
    Evaluation
    • Re-enrol in formal education
    • 81. Increase chances to get a new/ better job
    • 82. Found social or commercial enterprise
  • CDI’s approach looks beyond narrow course outputs
    UK outcomes & ecosystem
    Next step elements required
    • Industry certification & accreditation of training programme
    • 83. Apprenticeship programme with companies
    • 84. Partnership with further education institutions
    • 85. Partnership with social enterprise seed funders & support e.g. UnLtd
    • 86. Partnership with commercial seed funders & support
    Employment
    Partners
    Course
    Pre-Course
    Education
    Enterprise
  • 87. Two pilot types will answer technical & educational questions
    Multiple pilots
    Launch
    Refinement
    Prototypes
    Critical learning prototype
    Critical learning course pilot
    • Take decision about core course content
    • 88. Launch core course
    • 89. Continue to develop advanced courses
    • 90. Full-run 4-months course by partner
    • 91. 4-6 weeks
    • 92. Short run
    • 93. Focus on pedagogy
    Mobile app development prototype
    • Involvement of technical experts
    • 94. Full mobile app development
    • 95. Coding & testing
    • 96. 4-months course
  • A learning plan
    A12-month programme to launch
    Launch
    Refinement
    Prototypes
  • 97. Million users
    PC Internet growth 1995-2008
    A global opportunity for growth
    In 5 years mobile Internet will be bigger than PC Internet today
    Broadband Internet forecast
    Million users
    Source: Internet World Stats, Ovum broadband forecasts 2009
  • 98. A significant opportunity for social impact
    Strategy for global expansion
    • Mobile only universal infrastructure in many emerging countries
    • 99. Many people will access Internet first time on mobile phones
    • 100. Take learning outside the course room
  • cdiukfeasibility.wordpress.com
    mauricio@cdi.org.br
    iris@zeitgeist-advisors.net
    Transforming lives through technology, education and citizenship