CDI UK Feasibility Study 2009 - Digital Inclusion Research
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CDI UK Feasibility Study 2009 - Digital Inclusion Research

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This is the summary report of the CDI UK feasibility study produced by Zeitgeist Advisors. Please share and attribute on a non-commercial Creative Commons licence basis.

This is the summary report of the CDI UK feasibility study produced by Zeitgeist Advisors. Please share and attribute on a non-commercial Creative Commons licence basis.

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CDI UK Feasibility Study 2009 - Digital Inclusion Research CDI UK Feasibility Study 2009 - Digital Inclusion Research Presentation Transcript

  • Centre for Digital Inclusion Transforming lives through technology, education and citizenship UK Feasibility Study Summary final report by Zeitgeist Advisors August 2009
  • Introduction   This presentation sets out the findings and recommendation about the feasibility for the Centre for Digital Inclusion (CDI) to launch operations in the United Kingdom.   Based on the initial feedback from digital inclusion players in the UK, CDI’s model of combining ICT training of individuals with community problem solving and citizenship empowerment had been identified as a potentially valuable contribution to the digital inclusion landscape in the UK. The study aimed to verify this hypothesis and to define the role CDI could play in the digital inclusion landscape in more detail .   Zeitgeist Advisors (ZA) was contracted to assess UK market conditions, the value chain of digital inclusion as well partnership and financing options for a pilot project.   The project was completed between April and August 2009. (cc)
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  • Methodology   For the study more than 45 interviews were conducted with experts involved in the fields of digital inclusion, youth, entrepreneurship, community & social media, community development & regeneration, informal learning and citizenship education.   ZA completed site visits to UK Online Centres and community organisations in London/ Hackney, Nottingham, Shipley, Manchester, Cambridgeshire, Black Country, Birmingham and London/ Lambeth.   ZA conducted two informal discussion groups with young people in Hackney (Pedro Club) and Southampton (Fairbridge).   For the project ZA attended four conferences: National Digital Inclusion Conference, Shine ‘09, Reboot Britain and Connected Generation ’09.   An expert brainstorming session was hosted by CDI trustee Charles Leadbeater which provided additional input into the project as did the information provided by CDI’s operations and strategy teams in Rio de Janeiro. (cc)
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  • Project Approach During the 16-week project different key elements of feasibility were studied 3 Positioning in digital 1 2 inclusion 5 6 7 Kick-off and process Pilot KPI definition & Final Report & Digital & social management exclusion programme operational Go/No-Go arrangements landscape 4 options requirements Decision Community partnership options (cc)
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  • Executive Summary Observations   The technology, digital inclusion and education landscape in the UK is very different from any other country CDI has been operating to date.   The digital inclusion sector in the UK is well-developed, crowded and competitive. There has been significant investment by the public, private and third sectors in the field during the past 10 years.   There are leading-edge technology and social enterprise initiatives especially in the areas of social and digital media.   Young people – traditionally CDI’s core target audience – have been exposed to a wide range of technology through education and work. More than 97% of 16-24 year olds are using the Internet.   The average skill level in the UK is significantly higher than in any other country CDI has been operating today, thus there is a larger premium on advanced knowledge- based skills. (cc)
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  • Executive Summary Conclusions   CDI’s traditional model of basic IT skills is not needed in the UK as there is a broad range of players involved in that space.   CDI needs to shift its model to new technology platforms that are attractive to young people – primarily Internet and application enabled mobile phones like the iPhone.   While keeping the spirit of CDI’s pedagogy it will need to shift from an action to a critical-learning based approach to meet the requirements of advanced knowledge- based economies like the UK.   In order to achieve compelling outcomes CDI will have to have a bigger focus on establishing a full eco-system of support for its course graduates.   Testing this approach will need to involve a series of pilots; the learnings from which will add value to the digital inclusion space, drive CDI brand recognition through innovation and thought leadership, and create a range of fund-raising opportunities.   The experience gained by CDI on smartphones in the UK will allow it to expand both into other developed markets and developing countries with poor fixed Internet infrastructure. The UK initiative is thus of high strategic importance for CDI globally. (cc)
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  • Agenda 1 Digital and social exclusion landscape 2 Position in digital inclusion process 3 Pilot program options 4 Partnership analysis 5 Pilot design 6 Operations & financials 7 Conclusions & recommendations (cc)
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  • Internet penetration benchmark UK Internet adoption is amongst one of the leading worldwide. CDI has typically been operating in much less mature technology markets. Internet penetration (2008) % of population 80% 74% 71% 70% 60% 51% 49% 50% 39% 40% 34% 32% 30% 26% 25% 23% 18% 20% 12% 9% 7% 10% 0% Internet penetration Global average * In progress + in planning ‘’ fundraising-only today Source: Internet World Stats 2009 (cc)
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  • Internet usage UK More than 97% of all young people are using the Internet, even more than 50% of non-skilled adults use the Internet % of AdultsGreat Britain never used Internet adults, who have % of adults, Great Britain Internet access & educational qualification % of adults, Great Britain % of adults, Great Britain 100% 100% 93% 89% 90% 90% 86% 82% 80% 80% 74% 70% 70% 60% 60% 56% 50% 50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% 2006 2007 2008 2008 all 16-24y 25-44y Degree level or higher Higher educational qualification 45-54y 55-64y 65+ A Level GCE/ GCSE (A-C grade) Source: Office of National Statistics 2008 (cc)
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  • Timeline policy initiatives During the last decade the UK government has had a strong focus on digital inclusion 2009 Informal Adult Learning whitepaper (DIUS) & Informal Learning Transformation Fund 1999-2004 1998-2003 2004-2007 2007 2008 2009 Office of the e- Tools for schools & capital E-Government Unit Digital Challenge Minister for Digital Digital Britain Envoy (Cabinet modernisation fund (Big Lottery) (Cabinet office) DC10+ Network Inclusion (Cabinet) report (BERR/ office) (CLG) DCMS) 2000 2000-2003 2005 2006 2008 2009 UK Online Centres Wired-up Inclusion though Digital Digital Inclusion Digital Champion created (DfES) Communities (DfES) Innovation & Digital Inclusion Action Plan appointed Computers Within Strategy Team Consultation (CLG) Reach (Cabinet Office/ DTI) 2008 2009 Communities in Control Aspirations & attainment in Whitepaper & Digital Mentors deprived communities Programme (CLG) Whitepaper (CO, DCSF, CLG)   £5 billion invested in formal and informal educational ICT infrastructure from 1997-2007   School pupils per computer in 2007 -> 6:1 in primary and 3.6:1 in secondary education Sources: Zeitgeist Advisors, Neil Selwyn (2008) (cc)
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  • Digital inclusion – policy definition Digital inclusion is a very broad and unfocused term in the UK policy debate. Different players pursue different objectives.   Digital Inclusion means different things to different people: ─  giving people the basic ICT skills to participate in the knowledge economy ─  closing the Digital Divide ─  making technology and electronic services accessible for the disabled and elderly ─  giving people broadband Internet access ─  preventing economic exclusion from electronic commercial and public services ─  preventing social exclusion from digitally connected communities ─  using any digital technology to tackle social exclusion ─  using any digital technology in communities to tackle area-based deprivation   “The use of technology either directly or indirectly to improve the lives and life chances of disadvantaged people and the places in which they live” (Digital Inclusion Team) (cc)
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  • E-society UK Especially the group of e-marginalised people are of interest to CDI Typology   Not averse to the use of electronic technologies   Lack the disposable income to equip themselves with them   Lack training and education to understand how to make effective use of them Personal characteristics   Many unskilled young workers   Many live in low rise council estates   Many affected by high unemployment, low incomes and reliant upon public services Source: e-Society Profiler CASA/ Experian 2006 More information in Annex 2: Digital and social exclusion landscape (cc)
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  • New technology trends Mobile Internet and mobile application usage are major areas of growth UK consumer-only smartphone sales 1,400 18%   Mobile broadband sales grew from 16% 16% 76,000 in 02/08 to 263,000 in 05/09 1,200 14% 1,000 12%   Q1 ’09: 8 million people accessed 12% the Internet via their mobile phones 800 9% 10% compared to 5.7 million in Q1 ’08 600 7% 1,230 8%   Increasing take-up of smartphones 970 6% 400 4% drives mobile Internet usage 560 4% 490 200 2%   Smartphones defined by Ofcom as 170 handset running an full operating 0 0% system (e.g. Symbian, Android, Q1 2005 Q1 2006 Q1 2007 Q1 2008 Q1 2009 iPhone) Smartphone unit sales Smartphone sales a % handset sales Source: Ofcom The Communications Market Report 2009 (cc)
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  • PC vs. mobile broadband Internet Ovum forecasts that more than 2 billion people will be using the mobile broadband Internet by 2014. These are more users than the PC Internet today. PC Internet growth 1995-2008 Broadband Internet forecast Million users Million users 3,000 3,000 2,762 2,500 2,500 2,209 2,000 2,000 1,574 1,696 1,500 1,319 1,500 1,320 1,093 1,018 1,031 1,000 817 1,000 719 805 587 624 513 500 361 500 248 147 16 36 70 0 0 DSL Internet Cable modem Internet Source: Internet World Stats, Ovum broadband forecasts 2009 Fixed other Internet Mobile Internet (cc)
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  • Digital Inclusion Landscape – Summary The UK landscape is a for shrinking and crowded market traditional digital inclusion   Internet adoption: UK is a significantly more mature market and the digital divide is smaller than in any other country in which CDI operates.   Access: Computer access is already wide-spread due to heavy public and private investment in the education and ICT sector.   The E-marginalised are often young, unskilled or unemployed living in council housing   Mobile Internet & smartphones: Smartphone market share and mobile usage have grown rapidly in the last few years.   Youth & mobile: Young people are much more likely than older people to use Internet services on their mobile phones. More than half of 18-24 year olds are aware of what an mobile application store is, compared to less than a quarter of the population as a whole.   Access to the Internet globally will be increasingly via handsets and the mobile Internet More information and statistics about the “Digital and social exclusion landscape” in Annex 2. (cc)
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  • Agenda 1 Digital and social exclusion landscape 2 Position in digital inclusion process 3 Pilot program options 4 Partnership analysis 5 Pilot design 6 Operations & financials 7 Conclusions & recommendations (cc)
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  • Digital Inclusion value chain During the last 10 years the value of different initiatives has shifted with players adapting to changes and expanding into new areas Computer recycling Safety & security & procurement Basic IT skills IT outsourcing & IT maintenance & data base design Access to IT support Programming & Internet cafe advanced skills & printing Website design services & other services Digital media skills High value 1999-2000 2001-2003 2003-2005 2006-2009 offer in UK Examples of   Wired-up   UK Online Centres   Recycle IT   WiseKids communities   Easy Internet   Cosmic in Devon   CHC BIT initiatives   Community cafes   4iP networks   Talk About Local, PVM Current economic value (cc)
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  • CDI focus vs. UK market focus Most of CDI’s existing activities are no longer priority areas for the UK Computer recycling Safety & security CDI Basic IT skills & procurement IT outsourcing &   Focus on access, basic data base design Access to IT IT maintenance & skills & recycling support Programming & Internet cafe advanced skills   Expansion into services, Website design & printing services & other services Digital media skills maintenance & support Computer recycling Safety & security UK market Basic IT skills & procurement IT outsourcing &   Focus on programming IT maintenance & data base design Access to IT support skills and digital media Programming & Internet cafe advanced skills   Decline of recycling, & printing services Website design & other services Digital media skills Internet cafes & support Heavy focus Medium focus Low focus Very low or no focus (cc)
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  • The next bounce of the ball? The digital inclusion value chain will expand further as new technologies will grow Computer recycling Safety & security Universal & procurement Basic IT skills high-speed IT outsourcing & broadband Access to IT Internet cafe IT maintenance & support data base design Programming & advanced skills Mobile ? & printing Website design Internet skills services & other services Digital media skills 1999-2000 2001-2003 2003-2005 2006-2009 2010-? Mobile Internet skills will be more important as mobile Internet and smartphone markets grow Fixed broadband is likely to become seen as an essential utility with universal access (cc)
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  • Competitive Map by Social Change Theory No existing UK digital inclusion organisation offers a systematic social entrepreneurship learning programme as part of its curriculum Citizens Moving IT Talk Forward We People’s About Online Share Voice Social Local Stuff Media by UK Online Social Centres ELATT Podnosh CMA CDI IT in schools UK Cambridge Villages Archive Network No explicit social Document social Support social Learn social focus issues entrepreneurs entrepreneurship CDI’s 5-step pedagogy enables people to achieve social change in their communities is unique in the UK and offers an opportunity (cc)
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  • Technology & Social Change Matrix Moving into the mobile Internet space addresses both a technology and social change gap in the UK market CDI Handheld Mobile Internet learning in Fix My Mobile Street skills schools We People’s Talk Share Voice About Stuff Media Local Social & digital Social CDI 2.0 media skills Podnosh by CMA Social Moving IT UK IT in Forward Cambridge Villages schools Archive ELATT Network IT & Internet CDI 1.0 Citizens UK Online skills Online Centres No explicit Document Support social Learn social social focus social issues entrepreneurs entrepreneurship CDI has the opportunity to become a market leader in the emerging mobile Internet space and to expand the concept of digital inclusion further (cc)
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  • Digital Inclusion Positioning – Summary New technologies like mobile will drive value creation in the digital inclusion value chain in the future   Digital inclusion – a dynamic concept: The activities of UK digital inclusion players have shifted during the last 10 years as markets have evolved   Commoditisation of digital inclusion services: Initially high priority and high value services become commoditised over time   A mix of different value services: Long-term successful players have adapted to changing market conditions and are offering a mix of higher and lower value services   High competition for lower value services: There are many commercial, public and third sector players involved in the provision of basic access and skills services   Mobile Internet opportunity: CDI has an opportunity to be the first to develop a new mobile Internet skills service, thus extending the concept of digital inclusion further More information about the “Position in digital inclusion process” in Annex 3. (cc)
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  • Agenda 1 Digital and social exclusion landscape 2 Position in digital inclusion process 3 Pilot program options 4 Partnership analysis 5 Pilot design 6 Operations & financials 7 Conclusions & recommendations (cc)
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  • Criteria for pilot program options Based on the historical success of CDI’s model in Latin America there are four criteria for pilot program options in the UK: Valuable to Income through Technology pull community Up-to date skills services partners   Technology   Clear benefits for   Offers students   Community attractive to CDI partners to engage leading skills to partners and students   Access to leap-frog into students have   CDI’s core target expensive education, potential to earn group: young technology employment, additional people entrepreneurship income   Contacts to companies or new resources CDI’s successful model can only be replicated when all of these criteria are fulfilled (cc)
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  • Pilot program options Based on its existing model CDI has four different strategic options to positions itself in the UK   Advice and consult public and third sector organisations on CDI’s Education only educational and distribution model model   Advice the trainers or advice other network organisations   Use CDI model to offer services to niche segments not yet digitally Basic IT & included and not covered by other service providers Internet skills model   Compete against digital inclusion providers based on more effective educational model   Expand into the field of social and digital media by partnering with Social & digital existing basic digital inclusion players using CDI’s educational model media model   Expand into nascent mobile Internet and application segment by Mobile Internet partnering with existing basic digital inclusion and social media players model using CDI’s educational model (cc)
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  • Evaluation of four pilot options The mobile Internet today fulfils many of CDI’s historical success criteria Valuable to Income Technology Up-to date community through pull skills partners services Education No Theoretical No impact CDI only technology not practical on skills only model used value Basic IT & Internet skills Declining Only to Catching-up Shrinking group of partners not with majority margins & model non-users yet using IT services Social & Gov & third Proven Social Advertising digital media sector focus demand, media skills and advice model but in demand competitors Attractive No other Mobile App store, but Mobile Internet to young offering, apps skills unproven yet model people but new in high challenge demand Fulfils
criterion:


 Fully


 ParFally
 Not
at
all
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  • Pilot Program Options – Summary Mobile Internet as best option for UK pilots   Historical success criteria: CDI’s historical success was based on a combination of right market timing & attractive technology, clear value proposition to partners, up-to- date technology skills and new income opportunities for CDI students & partners   Mobile Internet pilots as a high-risk & high-reward options that has the potential to fulfil historical success criteria   Mind-share & youth opportunity since there is no other established player in the market and young people are most aware of new mobile technologies For detailed more information about the pilot option assessment see Annex 4. (cc)
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  • Agenda 1 Digital and social exclusion landscape 2 Position in digital inclusion process 3 Pilot program options 4 Partnership analysis 5 Pilot design 6 Operations & financials 7 Conclusions & recommendations (cc)
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  • CDI Community Distribution Model The core of CDI’s model is to work in partnership with local organisations   CDI operates as a network of independent organisations based on a contractual relationship   CDI provides technology, branding, access to learning know-how, corporate partners and network   Local partners provide physical space, electricity, local marketing and support and staff to become educators   Network approach is scalable and allows for local customisation CDI operates as a wholesale organisation training local community organisations (cc)
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  • Community Partner Selection Criteria CDI operates a thorough system of due diligence and support for all local partners. Each organisation is scored on a range of criteria Sustainability Infrastructure Community   Interest and commitment   Physical space available   Level of connections with   Successful local social   Level of security local community entrepreneur   Electric installations   Literacy level of population   Local staff available   Internet access   Community development   Co-investment capacity/ expertise financial resources   Technology expertise   Opening hours While some criteria will be irrelevant CDI’s model offers a good template for selecting well-run community-based organisations (cc)
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  • Partnership Summary Community partners are a core part of CDI’s delivery model while there is no clear model for collaboration with digital inclusion players   Digital inclusion partners: There are no immediate synergies from partnering with existing digital inclusion players – and some even consider CDI’s traditional model as a threat   Delivery model: CDI operates as an intermediary/ wholesale organisation which delegates delivery of its programmes to local community partner organisations   Due diligence of community partners: CDI has developed a strong and successful due diligence process, but its detailed criteria will need to be adjusted to a UK context.   Pilot partners: Several organisations have been identified as potential partners for the pilots. A full due diligence will need to be completed. (cc)
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  • Agenda 1 Digital and social exclusion landscape 2 Position in digital inclusion process 3 Pilot program options 4 Partnership analysis 5 Pilot design 6 Operations & financials 7 Conclusions & recommendations (cc)
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  • Mobile Internet Pilot – Principles The design of the UK pilot program will need to take into account some core principles: Focus on smartphone technology   Not phone specific, but more general   Hybrid with computers for social impact   Two different prototypes need Critical pedagogy & learning to test key assumptions during the pilot programme:   CDI 5-step methodology framework   UK education & learning environment specific ─  Educational curriculum/ Realistic outcomes critical learning prototype ─  Technical prototype   Progression for CDI alumni   Ability of students to learn programming skills focused on mobile app development Potential for scalability   CDI distribution/ community partner model   Target groups of students (cc)
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  • Operating approach Three elements will be required for CDI’ s new operating model in the UK 1   People come to IT-experienced community partners in deprived areas   Community orgs select CDI students 2   CDI students get high-end mobile phones as part of the programme (monthly fee or volunteering) 3   4-month CDI Mobile course working as a small team with educator on social issue while learning technology skills   Mobile app for social change used, designed and developed (cc)
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  • CDI 5-step methodology framework All CDI courses are structured along its 5-step methodology framework Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Community Problem Solution Solution Impact analysis definition design delivery assessment “Read the world” “Research data” “Plan action” “Take action” “Evaluate path taken”   5-step methodology is a high-level framework, not a detailed course curriculum   Each course is in practice taught very differently in different CDI Communities, subject to the local community and circumstances   “Action” has two different meanings in CDI context: ─  Practical action of using technology (during course) ─  Social action outside the CDI Community (short-term, mid-term, long-term) (cc)
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  • Action-based learning vs. critical learning CDI’s courses today constitute a combination of action-based & critical learning Action-based learning Critical learning Theory/ frame- Act/ work apply Act/ Reflect apply Reflect Evaluate Evaluate Due to the higher education & literacy levels in the UK compared with other CDI operations, there needs to be a strong emphasis on best-practice frameworks for action For tertiary education enrolment benchmark see Annex 5. (cc)
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  • Skills Mapping to Original Structure CDI’s 5-step methodology can be linked to different key skills areas in a UK context Step 1 Step 2 Step 3   Theoretical input in CDI’s Community Problem Solution courses in Latin America analysis definition design varies significantly between different types of courses Analysis Creative & design, Technical skills & research Planning skills (IT & mobile)   CDI UK should engage skills with educational and Step 5 Step 4 business experts in order to develop the theory/ Impact Solution framework inputs for each assessment delivery course Evaluation skills Communication & mobilisation skills (cc)
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  • High-level course flow Before launching a prototype CDI UK will need to develop a complete course design which can be tested and evaluated   Local partner will need to be actively involved with their local expertise   CDI existing courses can function as a guide, but only limited practical materials are available to date (cc)
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  • Pilot program flow A fast prototype will test key assumptions while full pilots will test learning materials and outcomes Critical learning prototype Refinement & technical prototype Launch Months 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Pilot 1: Develop critical Fast Evaluate Evaluate Launch learning course prototype Critical learning course (full run) pilot critical prototype course learning Pilot 2: Evaluate Develop mobile apps mobile course Test mobile app course (full run) pilot apps Eco- Pilot eco-system Test eco-system partnerships system (cc)
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  • CDI’s traditional eco-system In Latin America CDI has a relatively weak, but growing focus on its eco-system Employment Apprenticeships   CDI is working in CDI job hunting services partnership to deliver Conexão   CDI had some smaller Advanced courses projects to put alumni into apprenticeships Enterprise Education CDI basic Conexão   Becoming a CDI educator No links IT course CDI seed finance has been a core exit route for alumni   Formal education and advanced skills has been less of importance in Latin Educator America CDI training (cc)
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  • UK outcomes & ecosystem Partnerships and a strong eco-system will be essential in the UK in order to achieve its ultimate outcomes and ensure students moving on successfully Next step elements required   Industry certification & accreditation Employment of training programme P   Apprenticeship programme with a companies r Pre- t   Partnership with further education Course n Education Course institutions e r   Partnership with social enterprise s seed funders & support e.g. UnLtd Enterprise   Partnership with commercial seed funders & support For detailed UK eco-system model see Annex 5. (cc)
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  • High-level learning plan The pilots should be completed during a 12-month period including multiple prototypes and refinements Prototypes Refinement Launch Timeline Month 1-6 Month 7-12 Month 12+ Course &   Translation   Online learning   England launch Curriculum   Initial materials   Evaluation   Advanced courses   Skills theory   Full-run course   Crowd-funding   Marketing Eco-system   Enthusiasts   Technical experts   Formal partnerships   Enterprises   Education Course type   1st run of short & fast   2nd run of no app dev   tbd prototype course course (by partner org only) (no app development)   1st run of app dev course Size   5-15 students   15-30 students   50-100 students  1-2 educators   5 educators   10-20 educators  1 partner org   2-3 partners   8-10 partners (cc)
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  • Pilot Design – Summary A successful pilot programme will require CDI to develop new educational and technical organisational capabilities   Technical & critical learning pilots: Two different prototypes should be developed to test key assumptions and speed-up the learning process   Extending the 5-step methodology: CDI framework will still apply, but will need a stronger focus on skills and frameworks to take into account the UK economic context   Strong eco-system focus: In order to optimised the outcomes for CDI alumni there is a need to build a strong supporting eco-system of next-step partners early on   Launch to scale: After the completion CDI should be able to scale the programme very quickly (cc)
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  • Agenda 1 Digital and social exclusion landscape 2 Position in digital inclusion process 3 Pilot program options 4 Partnership analysis 5 Pilot design 6 Operations & financials 7 Conclusions & recommendations (cc)
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  • Funding types & sources for pilot phase There are a range of potential funders for the pilot projects which will require further qualification and research Foundations Corporate philanthropy Individuals   Nominet Trust   CDI existing corporate   Successful technology   Media Trust – Digital Mentors technology partners like Dell entrepreneurs & Prince’s Trust   BIG Mediabox   Mobile phone operators (O2, mentors Vodafone, T-Mobile)   Social business angel   Esmée Fairbairn Foundation – New Approaches to Learning   Handset manufacturers networks (VPF members, (Apple, Research in Motion, EquityPlus)   Nesta Palm, Nokia)   Young Foundation – Learning Launchpad   Other telecoms operators (Virgin Media, BT)   MacArthur Foundation – Digital Media and Learning   Mobile operating system providers (Google/ Android, Competition Microsoft Mobile, Symbian   4iP network partners Foundation) (cc)
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  • Mid-term sustainability & services CDI Mobile will need to find a sustainable business model that goes beyond a pure fundraising model   CDI will need to test and explore new business models in the UK   CDI 2.0 services are unlikely to be sufficient in a mature UK market   CDI could explore equity-like investments for further expansion (cc)
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  • Pilot project impact measurement In order to create a robust impact measurement approach in the UK, CDI will be beta-testing its new data management tool plus establish qualitative monitoring Prototypes Refinement   Number of course applications   Number of course applications   Registration / baseline survey   Registration / baseline survey Students   Interim feedback & attendance   Interim feedback & attendance   Exit interview/ completion survey   Exit interview/ completion survey   Online platform   6-month outcome survey Alumni   1.5 year outcome survey   On-boarding interviews   Course refinement objectives   Interim feedback loops   Additional feedback loops Educators   In-depth course end interview   In-depth course end interview   Course adjustments   Initial partnership launch with   Educator assessment & assessment Community commitments & expectations of partnership and commitments partners   Ongoing feedback on operational challenges, educators performance (cc)
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  • Operations & financials – Summary Before launching pilots CDI will need to put certain elements in place:   CDI Matriz & UK resources: CDI will need to carefully assess whether it will be able to dedicate the necessary staff resources for strategic direction & knowledge-transfer to a new strategic initiative, CDI Mobile   Governance structure: CDI Mobile will require significant new development and as such should be treated separately from existing desktop-based operations   Enough investment to allow for closely monitored prototyping & testing: CDI should raise enough seed money that will allow the pilot programme be run with different prototypes and to allow for clearly monitored impact assessment   Grant-funded seed investment: For the pilots loan or equity-like investment vehicles will be inappropriate and fundraising should be focused on grant funders & individuals as well mobile telecoms companies (cc)
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  • Agenda 1 Digital and social exclusion landscape 2 Position in digital inclusion process 3 Pilot program options 4 Partnership analysis 5 Pilot design 6 Operations & financials 7 Conclusions & recommendations (cc)
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  • Recommended pilot option for CDI UK The mobile Internet and CDI Mobile are the largest opportunity for CDI in the UK CDI Mobile Why?   Keep existing social change model,   5-step model works, but will require Social change but add additional content on additional input to achieve full model research & analysis, design skills as potential in a developed knowledge relevant to UK context economy   Use mobile Internet & smart phones   Desktop computers are no longer Technology as key pull factor for young people, attractive in themselves platform but use IT infrastructure as necessary   Existing IT infrastructure can be utilised and leveraged for program   CDI Mobile needs to be embedded in   CDI is late to market and initial UK digital inclusion, social credibility will depend on partnerships Eco-system entrepreneurship, community   Effectiveness of CDI depends on development and youth eco-system frictionless connection with partners   Different options for sustainable   Only nascent competition in that income streams through mobile space from social action point of view Sustainability Internet apps & mobile Internet   High and growing commercial expertise for social change demand for mobile Internet skills (cc)
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  • Possible risks for CDI Mobile success As a new innovative programme CDI Mobile has a range of risks that require mitigation Risks Mitigation actions   Funders & social investors not interested in   Mobilise CDI networks over short, but CDI Mobile and pilot projects condensed period in order to assess interest   Community partners have no space or ability to   Adjust due diligence criteria for mobile Internet run CDI Mobile programme programme & sign clear partnership agreement   CDI governance structure does not allow for   Adjust governance structure that allows for fast and flexible decision making for the pilots entrepreneurial and flexible operation with   minimum bureaucracy Eco-system   CDI UK has neither educational nor technical   Ensure educational knowledge transfer through skills internally to fully deliver programme LatAm educator & build network of sympathetic developers   Learning technical mobile app development   Turn mobile app development into advanced skills takes longer than CDI basic course course or “outsource” development work to technical volunteers until simple tools exist   While testing with one type of smart phone   Smart phones chosen by CDI are not attractive design programme to be independent from to young people technology vendor/ operating system over time   Low motivation of students & high-drop out   Increase barriers to entry and charge monthly rates fee (or volunteering commitment) to students (cc)
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  • For more information Read the project and pilot blog: http://www.appsforgood.org Visit CDI Europe website: http://www.cdieurope.eu Visit CDI global website: http://www.cdiglobal.org This report was produced by Zeitgeist Advisors Ltd. Iris Lapinski Director Zeitgeist Advisors Ltd. iris@zeitgeist-advisors.net (cc)
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  • Annex (cc)
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  • Annex 1 Interviewees & research reports (cc)
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  • Interviews (1) ZA conducted expert interviews with the following people: Alice
Goldie
 Migrant
Resource
Centre,
Online
Centre
Co‐ordinator
 Andrew
EntecoR
 Cambridge
OnLine
 Andrew
Purvis
 Fairbridge,
CEO
 Anne
Faulkner
 UK
Online
Centres
 Ben
Metz
 Ashoka,
Director
UK
 Carol
 Pedro
Club,
Hackney
 Cassie
Hague
 Futurelab
 Damani
Goldstein
 Connected
CommuniFes/
RSA
Senior
Researcher
 Dan
McQuillan
 Make
Your
Mark/
Social
InnovaFon
Camp
 David
Wilcox
 Social
Reporter,
Social
by
Social
 Davinder
Kaur
 SWEDA
 Deborah
Carrington
 Black
Country
ConsorFum
Ltd,
ExecuFve
Director
 Don
Macdonald
 North
West
London
Online
 Ellie
Stoneley
 DC10+
/
UK
Villages
 Essi
Lindstedt
 CiFzenship
FoundaFon
 Gary
Copitch
 People's
Voice
Media
 Helen
Milner
 UK
Online
Centers
CEO
 Imran
Jamal
 BRAC
 Jo
Higgins‐Cezza
 Becta,
Head
for
Digital
Inclusion
 John
Bateman
 Youth
UK,
CEO
 Kevin
Harris
 Community
development
and
social
media,
ex‐
Community
Development
FoundaFon
 Kevin
Russel
 UK
Online
Centres
 Leon
Cych
 Learn4Life
 Margery
Ellis
 Shipley
College
 Marilyn
Burrill
 Black
Country
ICT
Gateway's
Digital
Inclusion
Manager,
Birmingham
 Michael
Grimes
 Birmingham
Bloggers,
CiFzenship
FoundaFon
 (cc)
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  • Interviews (2) ZA conducted expert interviews with the following people: Mike
Cushman
 LSE,
Researcher
on
Digital
Inclusion
 Natasha
Johnson‐Richards
 Go
Digit
All
 Nick
Booth
 Podnosh
 Nick
Dickens
 Prisons
ICT
Academy
 Peter
Bailey
 Big
LoRery
Fund
 Simon
Berry
 ex‐RuralNet
 Simon
Blake
 New
Philanthropy
Capital
 Stephen
Dodson
 DC10+
 Stephen
Kearney
 High
Trees
Community
Development
Trust,
Lambeth
 Steve
Alcock
 NFTE
 Steve
Capes
 Cambridge
Library
Learning
Services
 Steve
Thompson
 Digital
Villages
 Stuart
Parker
 We
share
stuff
 Tim
Davies
 Youth
Engagement
Online
 Tom
Gaskin

 CounFng
Cows/
UK
Youth
Work
 Will
Davies
 Researcher
on
social
capital
‐
digital
inclusion/
Podnosh
 Will
Perrin
 Talk
About
Local
 William
Hoyle
 Charity
Technology
Trust
 Yasrab
Sharif
 Moving
IT
Forward
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  • Feedback by young people What technology inspires you?   Young people living in deprived areas in Sandwell, Hackney & Southampton: ─  Mobile phones: iPhone, Blackberry Storm, etc. ─  GPS systems ─  iPod and music players ─  Gaming consoles: PSP, Xbox360, Wii (cc)
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  • Academic reports & research There are a few thinkers criticising the current debate around digital inclusion   The Internet in Britain: 2007. Oxford Internet Institute. Bi-annual report that monitors Internet usage patterns and reasons for not getting online   A review of the current landscape of adult informal learning using digital technologies: 2009. Futurelab. Very recent overview of different initiatives and activities of informal adult learning with technology in the UK   Digital Divide: 2007. Futurelab. Focussing on the social dimensions of the digital divide and the avoidance of technical solutions.   Realising the potential of new technology? Assessing the legacy of New Labour’s ICT agenda 1997-2007: 2008. Neil Selwyn. Oxford Review of Education   Penceil project papers 2005-2006. Mike Cushman. London School of Economics.   Aspiration and attainment amongst young people in deprived communities. Discussion paper: 2008. Cabinet Office Social Exclusion Taskforce. (cc)
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  • Key policy reports There are two recent government reports that have received widespread attention in the area of digital inclusion Digital Britain Report (Lord Carter) Digital Inclusion Action Plan (2009)   Interim report Jan ‘09, final report to published June ’09   Consultation report published in 2008, final report to be driven by BERR and DCMS published mid- 2009   Covers a broad range of topics including: ─  Next generation access networks   Driven by digital Inclusion Minister, but located primarily in DCLG ─  Digital content and rights ─  Universal service obligation for broadband   More a thought piece about an extremely broad ─  Digital skills and media literacy definition of digital inclusion and less about actual   Most of the political debate is around the first 3 areas action points or investment commitments especially: ─  market-led approach in NGA infrastructure   Lists the range of initiatives that are already happening investment and the role for operators, especially the Building Democracy Innovation Fund and its investment in MySociety projects ─  digital TV and radio switch-over ─  creation of a new Rights Agency to protect   Digital Champion, Charter for Digital Inclusion, expert copyright online taskforce and cross-government coordination team ─  merger of public service broadcasters suggested ─  2 Mb/s universal service commitment   Digital Inclusion and literacy play a smaller role: ─  digital life, work and economy skills ─  National Media Literacy Plan (cc)
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  • Research by UK Online Centres UK Online Centres has been publishing a range of externally commissioned research to make the case for its effectiveness and ongoing funding   Reply to DIUS informal learning consultation 2008 especially annexes. Maps the experiences and learning journeys of different UK Online Centre users, but highlights the challenge for funding.   Digital inclusion, social impact: a research study. 2008 by Ipsos Mori. Analysis of the 20 Social Impact Demonstrator projects across different type of Centres.   Does the Internet improve lives? 2009. Research report based on focus groups of Internet users and non-users. Non-users split equally in Digitally Excluded and Rejectors. Rejectors tend to be better integrated into their local communities than Excluded. (cc)
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  • Evaluation of UK Online Centres Evaluation shows that community and voluntary organisations are the most effective UK Online Centres, but public e-service delivery is increasingly demanded   Connecting the Countryside: An evaluation of Capital Modernisation Funded UK online centres in rural areas: 2004. Recommends decentralised approach to rural centres and highlighted innovative approaches to revenue generation.   Evaluation of CMF funded UK online centres - final report: 2003. Hall Aitken. Overall report assessing UK Online Centres that concluded that community and voluntary sector UK Online Centres (45% of all UK Online Centers) are more effective in addressing the most excluded groups.   The future of community-based UK online centres – Discussion paper to DfES. Direct Support: 2002. Focussed on the strength of community based UK Online Centres.   Service transformation - a better service for citizens and businesses, a better deal for taxpayers. 2006 by Sir David Varney. Focussed attention on public service delivery through UK Online Centers.   Government on the Internet: progress in delivering information and services online. 2007 National Audit Office. Recommends to use UK Online Centres more directly for the delivery of an e-government agenda. (cc)
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  • Annex 2 Digital and social exclusion landscape (cc)
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  • Internet access UK More than 2/3 of households are accessing the Internet at home. There is a significant difference between different regions Households with Internet access Households with Internet access by region %, Great Britain %, Great Britain 74% 73% 70% 65% 70% 61% 70% 67% 67% 60% 57% 62% 61% 61% 61% 55% 50% 51% 60% 56% 56% 54% 50% 46% 50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2008 South East London East of England South West Wales Yorks & Humber East Midlands West Midlands Scotland Source: Office of National Statistics 2008 North West NI North East (cc)
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  • Internet non-usage Lack of interest and no need are becoming more important factors for non-Internet usage which lack of skills are less important Reasons of household for no Internet % of non-Internet users Access to Internet elsewhere Access costs too high   Internet adoption is flattening out and Lack of skills non-users are late or Equipment costs too high non-adopters Don't want Internet Don't need Internet 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 2006 2008 Source: Office of National Statistics 2008 (cc)
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  • Place of Internet access Only a small minority access the Internet through public access spaces like Internet cafes and libraries Reasons of household for no Internet % of non-Internet users, multiple answers allowed Home Place of work   Individual access Another person's home continues to grow in Place of education importance Public library Internet cafe Hotspot (wifi) At another place 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2006 2007 2008 Source: Office of National Statistics 2008 (cc)
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  • Technology adoption curve The UK has only few late adopters left Technology adoption Cumula&ve
   Adoption of new technologies typically Adop&ons
 takes time and follows the shape of an m
 S-curve UK Internet adoption   Ceiling penetration is defined by addressable market (m) estimate, considering, affordability analysis and Brazil Internet adoption covered population   Adoption curve based on coefficient of innovation and imitation Time
 (cc)
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  • Mapping digital exclusion There are a few academic and commercial institutions that have developed maps for different levels of e-inclusion   University College London - e-society profiler based on 2007 Experian data: ─  E-unengaged ─  E-marginalised ─  Becoming Engaged ─  Entertainment and Shopping ─  E-independents ─  Instrumental E-users ─  E-business users ─  E-experts   UCL – London profiler for social and digital exclusion in London   “Social and Digital Geographies of Great Britain” by the Digiteam at the Department of Communities and Local Government For reference see links on blog: http://cdiukfeasibility.wordpress.com/2009/06/16/e-society-maps/ (cc)
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  • E-society maps Group A: E-unengaged Parallel to the age structure of different regions the E-unengaged are located primarily in the North of England   The ‘E – unengaged’ are typically groups that do not have access to electronic communications or technologies. Most are too old, too poor or too poorly educated to be able to access them, and instead traditionally rely upon personal contacts they trust for advice. Within this Group there are low levels of literacy and many people do not feel that their life outcomes are much subject to their own decisions.   Members of this Group tend to live in the poorer areas of traditional mining and manufacturing towns and to have conservative social attitudes. A high proportion of the Group is made up of elderly people, many of whom live in social housing or sheltered accommodation. Source: e-Society Profiler CASA/ Experian 2006 (cc)
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  • E-society maps Group B: E-marginalised E-marginalised groups tend to be younger, but very much concentrated in urban and per-urban contexts   The ‘E – marginalised’ are not necessarily averse to the use of electronic technologies but often lack the disposable income to equip themselves with them, or the training and education needed to understand how to make effective use of them.   Many members of this Group are relatively unskilled young workers, many of whom are in manual occupations. Many also live in low rise council estates, in areas of high unemployment, low incomes and where people are reliant upon public services. Source:
e‐Society
Profiler
CASA/
Experian
2006
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  • E-society maps Other groups E-experts tend to be concentrated in the South-East Group
C:
 Group
D:

 Group
E:






















 Group
F:
 Group
F:

 Group
H:

 Becoming
 E
for
 E‐independents
 Instrumental
E‐ E‐business
users
 E‐experts
 engaged
 entertainment
 users
 and
shopping
 Source:
e‐Society
Profiler
CASA/
Experian
2006
 For more information see links on blog: http://cdiukfeasibility.wordpress.com/2009/06/16/e-society-maps/ (cc)
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  • E-society maps London Marginalised and expert users are living very close to each other in London   There is not one concentrated geographical area in London, where people are systematically digitally excluded Source:
London
Profiler
2008/9
 (cc)
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  • Index of Multiple Deprivation London Areas of deprivation are larger than areas of e-marginalised groups   There are geographical areas in the South, East and West of London which support from multiple deprivation Source:
London
Profiler
2008/9
 (cc)
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  • Mobile broadband & mobile apps New mobile technologies are most used and known by the well-off and young UK Take-up of mobile broadband Q1 ‘09 Public awareness mobile app stores % % 30% 60% 52% 25% 50% 45% 20% 19% 40% 30% 15% 30% 12% 10% 20% 18% 8% 8% 5% 10% 0% 0% AB C1 C2 DE Aged 18-24 Aged 25-34 Aged 35-44 Aged 45-54 Socio-economic group app stores all Source: Ofcom The Communications Market Report 2009 (cc)
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  • Annex 3 Position in digital inclusion process (cc)
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  • Mapping players & activities In order to get a full picture of organisations competing in the area different sectors and activities need to be taken into consideration Sector type CDI Community domains   Public sector   Access to technology ─  local authorities, government ─  new or refurbished computers departments, QUANGOs) ─  connectivity & support   Third sector/ social enterprises ─  special access equipment ─  charities, community interest   IT skills & training companies, community initiatives ─  Face-to-face or remote courses   Private sector ─  Formal & informal learning ─  SMEs or large for-profit companies   Community development & social focus ─  Using technology for a social aim   Entrepreneurship ─  Support to set-up own initiatives A market map needs to take into account CDI’s approach to citizenship and technology education which broadens the competitive space even further (cc)
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  • Digital inclusion players by sector There is a wide range of different players working on the topic of digital inclusion   Third sector and government initiatives dominate the digital inclusion sector Digital
   Academics often play a key Unite 
 role in action research as well as social media BECTA
 initiatives Cisco
   Social media and Fujitsu
 Services
 
 community reporting are BT
 growing Microsoi
Digital
 Literacy
curriculum
 (cc)
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  • Digital inclusion players by CDI domains No player offers the same combination of training elements, but there are players in each of CDI’s domains   Access to technology is a very crowded sector with significant public sector investment in the past Make
 Prince’s
 your
 Trust
 Mark
   IT skills and learning through technology has been mainstreamed into education   Citizenship education is a dedicated subject in schools   Social media initiatives are growing fast. (cc)
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  • Competitive map of UK landscape Most players are focusing on access and skills, but more are pushing into the community development space with a social focus Fujitsu Private Cisco Services Microsoft BT Digital Literacy Ruralnet Community Third /social Media enterprises Mediatrust Community & youth Association centres Digital NFTE Talk About Sector type Eco Unite Fix my street Prince’s Local Computer MovingIT Trust Citizens People’s Voice Media RecycleIT Online Make ELATT Your Podnosh Mark Wired-up Home communities LSC access Public Learndirect Tools for Schools UK Online Centres Becta Connexions Community dev.ment & Access to technology IT skills & training Entrepreneurship social focus CDI Community domains (cc)
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  • Digital inclusion & Social Change Theory There are different theories of social change used in the digital inclusion space No explicit social Document social Support social Teach social focus issues entrepreneurs entrepreneurship Activities   None   “Give people a voice”   Identify people who   Structured process   Sole focus on   Train people to are already involved to make people learning technical express their thoughts in community conscious of their skills and to document their   Teach them to use environment life realities technology, so they   Train people in social can be more effective mobilisation Theory of social change   New voices will attract   Existing community   New networks are   None attention and other activists achieve created in people will act more social change community and   Only individual people become social entrepreneurs Issues   No social change   Unclear link between   No new people   People might not voice and action   Small target market want to become active in community (cc)
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  • Annex 4 Pilot program options (cc)
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  • Education only model – SWOT The education only model is potentially a cost-effective way to spread CDI’s expertise but it lacks brand and operational credibility in the UK Strengths Weaknesses   Low investment costs   Educational expertise based in LatAm,   Potentially large impact on other not UK organisations and public sector   Low credibility in UK without operations   Lack of detailed knowledge of UK education and political advice system   Very slow up-take of advice Opportunities Threats   Shifting UK learning discourse towards   CDI brand discredited due to lack of local Paulo Freire inspired education model education practice and frameworks   Creating network of partners aligned with   Rejection of advice due to emerging CDI’s educational model economy background   Theory not practice-based approach in dissonance with education model (cc)
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  • Basic IT & Internet skills model – SWOT CDI could deploy traditional basic skills model fast, but growth will be limited to declining niche market Strengths Weaknesses   Core area of CDI expertise   Highly competitive with many incumbents   Proven operating model   Not formally accredited course   Pedagogic material like to require only   Only attractive to declining niche market translation and small adaptations   Unlikely to attract attention or support   Fast roll-out possible   Computer refurbishing model dying in UK Opportunities Threats   Partnering with UK Online Centres to fill   Hostility by UK digital inclusion players small gaps in provisioning   CDI school-like model not attractive to education-distant non-users   Severe limitations to future growth in UK (cc)
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  • Social & digital media model – SWOT Social media is currently the “hottest” market for citizenship journalism, but CDI has limited experience lagging behind UK initiatives Strengths Weaknesses   Significant attention & hype in public & 3rd   UK-native initiatives already operate & sector dominate mindshare   Large target market of people unfamiliar   CDI has limited expertise with social with social media media (blogs only)   Middle aged, not young target audience Opportunities Threats   Employment market for social media   CDI unable to catch-up with UK social skills growing media initiatives   Partnerships with basic IT skills   Number of digital inclusion players organisations like Citizens Online involved growing very fast   High competition for resources in the sector (cc)
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  • Mobile Internet model – SWOT Moving into the mobile Internet space is a high-risk, but potentially high reward strategy Strengths Weaknesses   No other digital inclusion players involved   Not traditional digital inclusion focus   Attractive to young people   High (but falling) cost of smartphones   Very leading edge skills   Nascent market   Access to technology still an issue   New mobile focused curriculum required   No technical expertise inside CDI on handheld learning Opportunities Threats   First market entrant   Immature market   Attract public attention & support   Growth slower than predicted   Prove CDI ability to innovate   Prices do not fall, scaling too expensive   Partner with broad range of players   Handheld learning model to different   High growth potential   Funders cannot see value of new   Take model back to developing countries proposition (cc)
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  • Examples of civic-minded iPhone apps While still a nascent market US and UK developers have started to turn their attention to civic challenges:   FixMyStreet iPhone app developed by MySociety/ UK:   Report local problems (graffiti, broken street lightning)   Record problems with iPhone, using camera and GPS & submit to local council   Create network of citizens interested in community problems   iPhone Apps for Citizen Engagement by Apps for Democracy/ Washington D.C.:   47 web, iPhone and Facebook apps developed by volunteers in 30 days   $2,300,000 value to D.C. city council at a cost of $50,000 in prize money   iPhone app iBurgh/ Pittsburgh:   Allows residents of Pittsburgh to take pictures of civic embarrassments and hazards and upload them directly to municipal public administration (cc)
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  • Annex 5 Pilot design (cc)
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  • Tertiary enrolment benchmark Tertiary enrolment in the UK is higher than in most other markets CDI has been operating to date. Enrolment in tertiary education (2006) Gross enrolment ratio (%) 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% n/a 0% * In progress + in planning ‘’ fundraising-only today Source: Unesco 2009 (cc)
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  • UK learning & technology ecosystem Working effectively with partners and ensuring a smooth transition in and out of the program for students will be essential for CDI’s success & reputation in the UK   The UK eco-system is morecomplex with different actors   The range of different outcome levels is likely to be broader in the UK   Formal education & accreditation play an important role in the UK   Different organisations and intermediaries will enhance or hinder CDI’s outcomes (cc)
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