Culture (Iris)Updated1
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  • 1. Traditional Costume- Kimono
    • Literally means “things to wear”
    • Basic Japanese clothing
    • Various types
      • For different occasions
        • Yukata
          • S ummer kimono
        • Shiro-maku
          • W edding kimono
  • 2. Traditional Costume- Kimono
    • Still worn in different occasions
    During graduation Shichigosan (a festival for children ) When going to temple
  • 3.
    • Clothing Accessories
    Obi - belt Shoes - Scandals Socks – Tabi socks
  • 4. Traditional Art
    • Performing art
      • Noh
        • Musical dance-drama
        • Actors usually wear masks
      • Kyogen
        • Spoken drama
      • Bunraku
        • Puppet play
  • 5. Traditional Art
    • Arts and crafts
      • Origami
      • Ikebana
        • (flower arrangement)
    Western Japanese
  • 6. Festivals
    • Shogatsu (New Year)
    • Hanami (Cherry-Blossom Viewing)
    • Tanabata (Evening of the seventh)
  • 7. Music
    • J -Pop (Japanese Pop)
      • Music affected by the west
    • Karaoke
  • 8. Manga (Comics)
    • First appeared after World War II
    • Readers – wide range
    • Types:
      • Fictional, romance, fun, mystery
    • 23.2% of sales and 37.8% of the volume of all books and magazines in Japan
  • 9.
    • Popularity through the world: Exported to Europe, America, Asia
      • eg: Dragon Ball (by Toriyama Akira) into movie
  • 10. Video games
    • NDS
    • W ii
    • PlayStation
    • XBox
    • GameBoy
  • 11. Technology
    • A rchitecture - safe building (protection against earthquake)
    • Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yss4vn6ERj8
  • 12. Technology
    • Transportation
      • Mature transportation network
      • eg: Shinkansen (Bullet train)
        • Covers most parts of Japan
        • Maximum speed: 270 kilometers per hour
  • 13. Technology
    • Robots which can…
      • Play music instruments
      • Do core housework
      • Act as a pet, accompany the elderly
  • 14. Downshifting Culture
    • From the west
    • Original idea
      • Encourage people to adopt less well paid life instead of financially rewarding but stressful one
      • T o have time for the important things in life
      • To have a less work-focused lifestyle
    • Twisted in Japan
      • Interpreted as living a easy life everyday, without specific goals
  • 15. Downshifting Culture
    • “ Underclass Society: Emergence of a New Class Society ” Miura Atsushi
    • Characteristics
      • Spend a whole day at home surfing the net or playing video games
      • Just looking for a simple, not challenging life
      • Think that is best to live their own life
      • Follow one’s inclinations, just do the things that they like
      • U ndisciplined personality, think that things are troublesome and prefer staying at home
      • Like to stay alone
  • 16. Downshifting Culture
      • Think that one’s own personality is plain and simple
      • Think that showing own style is trendy
      • Always eat snacks and fast food
      • Sometimes think eating is a troublesome matter
      • Annual income is less than 10 times of the age in terms of Yen
      • Single (male 33 or above, female 30 or above)
    • Different from the original idea
    • Self-centered
    • ‘ working’ is not important anymore
  • 17. Impact on society
    •  C hild pornography
      • Immoral thoughts added to teenagers’ minds
          • Compensated dating ( Enjo-kōsai )
    •  Fictional anime
    •  Downshifting culture
      • Give rise to Otaku and freeter
      • Create delusion of the reality
  • 18. Impact on society
    • Otaku and freeter
      • Freeter
        • NEET – Not in education, employment or training
        • No permanent job
        • Usually indulge themselves with foreign travel, hobbies or other passions
        • Parasite Single (feed on family)
          • Living with family, pay no rent
          • Do no housework
          • Come and go freely
  • 19. Impact on society
    • According to an article from the New York Times - Income gap in Japan: Part-timers sink below poverty line
    • … A Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare survey released last year revealed that the percentage of Japanese workers who are not in full-time jobs rose to 35 percent in 2003 from 28 percent in 1999 . This group of workers - including part-timers, contract workers and those holding temporary jobs - earns an average of ¥2 million or less annually, Morinaga said. …
    • … Economists pointed out that a pattern of widespread poverty may emerge when the current generation of parents retires and their low-income children eventually run out of parental resources to rely on. …
    •  would create great challenges to Japan economy
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/10/your-money/10iht-masia.html?_r=1&scp=9&sq=japan%20freeter&st=cse
  • 20. Impact on society
      • Otaku
        • May have permanent job
        • Tend to spend income on their hobbies
        • eg: comics and video games, but ignore other social or international issues
      • eg: cosplayers,
      • anime products collectors
  • 21. Impact on society
    • Another example of Otaku (from the New York Times - Love in 2-D )
    • Indulge in relationship with imaginary characters
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/magazine/26FOB-2DLove-t.html?scp=4&sq=otaku&st=cse “ Of course she’s my girlfriend,” “I have real feelings for her.”