Ti E Smart Grid Overview Rh 5 05 09

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A high level overview of the smart grid with descriptions of definition, benefits, activities, opportunities and companies

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Ti E Smart Grid Overview Rh 5 05 09

  1. 1. TiE Oregon's Clean Energy SIG Focus on the Smart Grid • Session 1 – May 2009 – An Introduction to the Smart Grid Market • Smart Grid Overview • Some local examples • Highlights of some opportunities to pursue • Session 2 – Early Fall 2009? – Global smart grid activities – Taking advantage of new legislation – Some local examples • Session 3 – Late Fall 2009? – TBD Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 1 Roger Hicks
  2. 2. Meeting Agenda Roger Hicks Business Consultant “What is the smart grid and why should we care?” An introduction to the smart grid concept along with a summary of problems it will address and some business opportunity examples in the emerging clean energy marketplace. John Thornton VP Manufacturing & Supply Chain, Porteon Electric Vehicles Inc. “Moving towards the intelligent convergence of vehicles, buildings and electric utilities.” An overview of perspectives on the future of transportation and sustainability: electric vehicles (EVs) and the Smart Grid as enabling technologies. Bill Sproull Sr. VP of Business Development & Customer Experience at ClearEdge Power “Smart and Clean Distributed Generation” How clean, high efficiency - smart - distributed generation can play a role in the Smart Grid of the future and, specifically as an example, what ClearEdge Power is doing to bring compact fuel cell combined heat and power systems to residential and commercial. Wrap-up “Discussion of Opportunities to Pursue” Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 2 Roger Hicks
  3. 3. What Is the Smart Grid and Why Should We Care? Roger Hicks TiE Clean Energy SIG Meeting 5-5-09 Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 3 Roger Hicks
  4. 4. Why All This Interest In Energy? • Electricity is one of the largest and most capital-intensive sectors of the economy. – Total asset value is estimated to exceed $800 billion, with approximately 60% invested in power plants, 30% in distribution facilities, and 10% in transmission facilities. • Annual electric revenues – the Nation’s “electric bill” – are about $247 billion – Paid by America’s 131 million electricity customers, which includes nearly every business and household. – There are more than 3,100 electric utilities and additionally, there are nearly 2,100 non-utility power producers, including both independent power companies and customer-owned distributed energy facilities. • There are a lot of risks we face by staying on the current path. – Uncertain access to fuel resources – cost may go out of control – Increasing harm to the atmosphere – global warming may change the planet – Unpredictable power outages – cascading grid failures disrupt commerce – Poor utilization of economic capital – unnecessary cost increases for energy users • “The grid of the future will require $165 billion over the next 20 years” - EPRI – The benefits to society will be $638 to 802 billion. The cost-benefit is 4 to 1. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 4 Roger Hicks
  5. 5. The 100 yr old Electric Power Grid Will Soon Go Through a Rapid Evolution Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 5 Roger Hicks
  6. 6. It’s Time to Think Different • While the Smart Grid will utilize the latest technology to achieve its goals, it is not just about technology. • Implementation of the Smart Grid will require a complete rethinking of the public policy, utility business models, business processes and consumer behavior. • This is a real paradigm shift! Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 6 Roger Hicks
  7. 7. So Just What is the Smart Grid? • Sed ut perspiciatis - unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, • Nemo enim ipsam - voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui • Neque porro quisquam est -qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius Nobody really knows yet but we sure are talking about it a lot. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 7 Roger Hicks
  8. 8. What is the Smart Grid? • According to US Department of Energy (DOE): – Smart Grid is the term used for an electricity delivery system that is integrated with modern digital and information technology to provide improved reliability, security, efficiency and ultimately lower cost to the user. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 8 Roger Hicks
  9. 9. The Vision of the Smart Grid Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 9 Roger Hicks
  10. 10. Source: NETL – A Systems View of the Modern Grid – Spring 2009 Visit our website at www.netl.doe.gov/moderngrid/ toSmart Grid Presentation by Oregon TiE - find out how you can 10 become more involved in this national effort to modernize theHicks Roger grid.
  11. 11. Benefits of the Smart Grid • Summary of Energy-Savings & Carbon-Reduction Mechanisms Enabled by a Smart Grid EPRI – The Green Grid Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 11 Roger Hicks
  12. 12. Goals and Characteristics, Which Together Characterize a Smart Grid From: FERC – Smart Grid Policy, March 2009 • Increased use of digital information and controls technology to improve reliability, security, and efficiency of the electric grid. • Dynamic optimization of grid operations and resources, with full cyber- security. • Deployment and integration of distributed resources and generation, including renewable resources. • Development and incorporation of demand response, demand-side resources, and energy efficiency resources. • Deployment of “smart” technologies (real-time, automated, interactive technologies that optimize the physical operation of appliances and consumer devices) for metering, communications concerning grid operations and status, and distribution automation. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 12 Roger Hicks
  13. 13. Goals and Characteristics, Which Together Characterize a Smart Grid From: FERC – Smart Grid Policy, March 2009 • Integration of “smart” appliances and consumer devices. • Deployment and integration of advanced electricity storage and peak- shaving technologies, including plug-in electric and hybrid electric vehicles, and thermal storage air conditioning. • Provision to consumers of timely information and control options. • Development of standards for communication and interoperability of appliances and equipment connected to the electric grid, including the infrastructure serving the grid. • Identification and lowering of unreasonable or unnecessary barriers to adoption of smart grid technologies, practices, and services. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 13 Roger Hicks
  14. 14. Smart Grid Knowledge Domains Energy Advanced Renewable Management Metering portfolio EMS RPS Systems Infrastructure standard AMI Demand Transmission Response and T&D DR Distribution Smart Cap and REP C&T Trade Grid Renewable Energy HAN DG Payments Home Area Distributed Networks Generation EV FERC TOU Federal Electric Energy Time of Use Vehicles Regulatory Rates Commission Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 14 Roger Hicks
  15. 15. How Utilities Respond to Peak Demand Will Change Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by EPRI – The Green Grid 15 Roger Hicks
  16. 16. The Electricity Transmission Network is Going to Change Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 16 Roger Hicks
  17. 17. How Systems Work Together Will Change Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by EPRI – The Green Grid 17 Roger Hicks
  18. 18. Infrastructure Devices Will Change EPRI – The Green Grid Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 18 Roger Hicks
  19. 19. Communications Will Change Smart Grid Standards Assessment and Recommendations for Adoption and Development, February 2009 Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 19 Copyright © 2009 EnerNex Corporation. All rights reserved. Roger Hicks
  20. 20. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 20 Roger Hicks Copyright © 2009 EnerNex Corporation. All rights reserved
  21. 21. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 21 Roger Hicks
  22. 22. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by From Grid 2030 report by US DOE 2003 22 Roger Hicks
  23. 23. Some Local Smart Grid Players • Measurement & Control – Veris Industries, Obvius – BPL Global, Powermand • Distributed Generation & Monitoring – PV Powered, ClearEdge Power, – Azuray Technologies, Deck Monitoring • Electric Vehicles and Infrastructure – Porteon, Shorepower Technologies Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 23 Roger Hicks
  24. 24. Veris Industries Ethernet Internet 4-20 mA 4-20 mA Phone line Internet Modbus RS-485 Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 24 Roger Hicks
  25. 25. Obvius Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 25 Roger Hicks
  26. 26. Challenges Facing the Utility Industry Grid Efficiency Reliability • Regulatory & • Aging grid infrastructure environmental constraints • Faults are increasing due to prohibiting supply growing loads with age • Central supply costs are • Challenging asset increasing management economics • Distributed energy resources are expensive Load Management Grid Communications • Demand is increasing beyond • Systems not prepared for supply capacity emerging applications • Metering infrastructure is • Limited network inadequate for data needs management capability • Growth is where supply is • Inadequate communications not Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 26 Roger Hicks
  27. 27. BPL Global’s Solutions Residential and Distribution Distribution Distributed Renewable Substation C&I Demand Grid Grid Generation & Storage Premise Substation Solutions Distributed Energy Resource Integration and Management Meet peak demand for Extend asset life and Integrate and optimize renewable sources of supply and storage ~1/3 the cost of new improve reliability generation Fault Location and Asset Protection Identify and isolate faults to improve reliability SG® - Integration and collaboration •Power Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 27 Roger Hicks
  28. 28. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 28 Roger Hicks
  29. 29. PV Powered’s SEGIS Award • PV Powered was awarded one of 12 contracts after a competitive solicitation process that attracted 27 applications • Total US DOE funding to PV Powered is worth up to $5M • The PV Powered project addresses five technology areas: – Customized suite of PV material-specific MPPT algorithms – Integration with commercial/industrial energy management (EMS) systems – Integration with utility Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) devices to enable a two-way interactive grid relationship – Mitigation of issued associated with weather induced transients – Smart string combiner tightly integrated with inverter Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 29 Roger Hicks
  30. 30. Where is the Smart Grid on The Hype Cycle? Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 30 Roger Hicks
  31. 31. Is It Time for the Smart Grid? Reasons to be excited Reasons to be cautious – We are at an inflection point – It’s a stimulus driven market – Innovation is needed to – Old industries change slowly unlock value – The value proposition is – It’s a long term movement unproven – There is a large ecosystem – The benefits to consumers are indirect – Gov’t is favorable and – Payback cycles are long throwing money at it – Alternatives are unattractive – It’s a complex combination of technology, policy, businesses – Lot’s of hype right now and relationships Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 31 Roger Hicks
  32. 32. It’s Time to Deliver the Smart Grid Source: PNNL Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 32 Roger Hicks
  33. 33. Thank You Contact Me If You Want to Know More about Smart Grid Opportunities roger.hicks@comcast.net 503.807.7627 Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 33 Roger Hicks
  34. 34. Backup Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 34 Roger Hicks
  35. 35. What is the Smart Grid? • According the Federal Energy Regulation Commission (FERC) – “The Smart Grid means a lot of things, but for us, the Smart Grid means a more efficient transmission system that can reduce emissions and increase reliability,” FERC Commissioner Philip Moeller said. “For example, by minimizing line losses, Smart Grid technologies will allow generators to produce less energy and less pollution, while delivering the same amount of electricity to customers.” • According to Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) – The term Smart Grid may be best understood as the overlaying of a unified communications and control system on the existing power delivery infrastructure to provide the right information to the right entity (e.g. end-use devices, T&D system controls, customers, etc.) at the right time to take the right action. – It is a system that optimizes power supply and delivery, minimizes losses, is self-healing, and enables next-generation energy efficiency and demand response applications. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 35 Roger Hicks
  36. 36. What Is the Smart Grid? • According to PJM - a Regional Transmission Operator: – Transitioning the grid from a radial system to a true network to ensure connectivity from generation sources to end-use customers. – Converting from an electro-mechanical to a fully digital system to support information and automation-enabled assets – Enabling two-way communication within the grid community so that customers can, if they choose, move from passive to active participation in the marketplace. • According to Oracle – An electricity delivery infrastructure that leverages advancements in IT, communications technology, and energy technology to improve delivery utilization/resilience and empower consumers to address environmental concerns Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 36 Roger Hicks
  37. 37. What is the Smart Grid? • According to Capgemini consulting: Nobody can tell you today exactly what technologies the future Smart Grid will incorporate but we have been able to compile a list of key characteristics. We expect each utility to have its own version of the Smart Grid but it is clear it will have the following characteristics: – Autonomous restoration – Resist attacks – both physical and cyber – Supports distributed resources – (generation, storage, demand reduction) – Supports renewable energy sources – Provides for power quality – Provides for security of supply – Supports lower operations costs – Minimizes technical losses – Minimizes manual maintenance and intervention. Capgemini Report - Smart Grid: Leveraging Technology to by Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation Transform T&D Operating Models 37 Roger Hicks
  38. 38. Smart Grid Ingredients Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 38 Capgemini Roger Hicks
  39. 39. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 39 Roger Hicks
  40. 40. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 40 Roger Hicks
  41. 41. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 41 Roger Hicks
  42. 42. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by 42 Roger Hicks
  43. 43. Oregon TiE - Smart Grid Presentation by www.netl.doe.gov/moderngrid 43 NETL – A Vision For a Modern Grid Roger Hicks

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