• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Diselo con...
 

Diselo con...

on

  • 754 views

Díselo con una historia es una manera diferente de explicar qué hacemos y sobretodo POR QUÉ lo hacemos. Un recurso imprescindible para conseguir llegar a más y más lejos.

Díselo con una historia es una manera diferente de explicar qué hacemos y sobretodo POR QUÉ lo hacemos. Un recurso imprescindible para conseguir llegar a más y más lejos.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
754
Views on SlideShare
754
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
11
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Gracias, Alejandra. Me alegro que te haya gustado y servido !!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Las historias han sido talladas, rayadas, pintadas, impresas o pintadas sobre madera o bambú, marfil y otros huesos, cerámica, tablillas de arcilla, piedra, hoja de palma libros, pieles (pergamino), paño de corteza, papel, seda, lienzo y otros textiles , registrado en la película, y se almacena electrónicamente en forma digital.
  • ¿POR QUÉ HISTORIAS? 1. RECORDAR. Las historias son lo que la gente recuerda y lo que la gente comparte naturalmente. Las historias tienen más resonancia con la gente que más formatos de presentación tradicionales. Buscamos historias como una manera de dar sentido a nuestras experiencias y el mundo que nos rodea. 2. ENTENDER. A nuestro cerebro le gustan las historias. Historias tocan profundos procesos psicológicos de la percepción, el aprendizaje y la memoria. La psicología cognitiva nos dice que la mente humana ha evolucionado a una facultad construcción de sentido narrativo que nos permite percibir y experimentar el caos de la realidad, de tal manera que el cerebro luego vuelve a ensamblar los diversos bits de experiencia en una historia en el esfuerzo de entender y recordar. Las Historias son un equilibrio entre la lógica (secuencia) y las emocionales (empatía) los aspectos de nuestro cerebro. 3. ROMPER BARRERAS Cualquiera puede contar una historia, sin importar la edad, raza, sexo, nivel de "expertise" o posición, o "alta o baja tecnología" - un ecualizador. Storytelling "tienta" la gente a escuchar a los demás. Esto puede abrir canales de comunicación entre personas de diferentes orígenes. Historias de dar voz a las perspectivas de otra manera silenciosa y permite múltiples perspectivas a surgir. El acto de escuchar, suspender el juicio, conociendo el uno al otro - son todos de gran alcance en la construcción de relaciones empáticas (y en el caso de las ayudas, las asociaciones fuertes). 4. SIMPLIFICAR EL MENSAJE. La historia te obliga a ir a la esencia, a lo que realmente es importante. El por qué. 4. INSPIRAR. Las historias no son "simples" - pueden sofisticado y elegante transmitir conceptos complejos y abstractos y ambiguos de manera concreta y práctica. Historias permitir que el juego tienen significado en el contexto del trabajo (en el que no se supone que deben actuar "infantil"). Historias de inspirar a la gente hacia la acción / cambio capturando la imaginación y predicar con el ejemplo, en lugar de persuadir con retórica.
  • Los relatos apelan a las emociones y eso los convierte en mensajes más notorios que los formados por argumentos racionales, cifras, datos o estadísticas
  • 1.- Among the most interesting findings: 1. The rich aren’t richly generous.  Says the Chronicle, “Middle-class Amer­i­cans give a far bigger share of their discretionary income to charities than the rich. Households that earn $50,000 to $75,000 give an average of 7.6 percent of their discretionary income to charity, compared with an average of 4.2 percent for people who make $100,000 or more. In the Washington metropolitan area, for example, low- and middle-income communities like Suitland, Md., and Capitol Heights, Md., donate a much bigger share of discretionary income than do wealthier communities like Bethesda, Md., and McLean, Va.” 2. You need to know the stories to care.  Rich people who live around rich people are less generous than rich people who live in more economically diverse communities. If you don’t see or hear about poverty, you aren’t as likely to act to remedy it.  This is why it’s so critical to submerge people in the experience of those less fortunate through storytelling, events and other efforts.  They have to know and feel to care. 2.- The identifiable victim effect.  The idea is, the larger the number of people in need, the less compelled donors are to help. This may not be rational but it sure is human. When humans hear about one identifiable victim, we care more than when we hear about millions. We tend to donate more when we feel we are helping an identified, single individual. (This is called the singularity effect .)
  • The Hero • Is not you • Is your audience • Is unlikely for the role • Is dissatisfied with a “broken world” • Is jaded and has the chance to just muddle through • has an inner calling to live values
  • Avoid the "kitchen sink." Some people try to relay every single aspect and bit of minutia about their organization and their programs in a story. While that may seem like a good idea -- the more information you put out the more convincing it is, right? -- it actually creates information overload. Instead, find one small anecdote or facet of your work and show how it relates to everything else. Create a snapshot that people will remember. Nice is not enough. You're a nonprofit and so you are doing good work -- it comes with the territory. That is not enough to pique somebody's interest. You need to find a good backstory -- something unique and something that can create emotion and interest. Don't be too close and don't be too far. If you're too close to your cause you may be numb to some of the interesting and amazing things that happen as a result of your work. If you're too far removed from your cause, you may be stuck in policy planning and have lost touch with the emotion of it. Share your senses. All five of them. The more you can make the reader feel like he or she is there, the better. Always keep your audience in mind. Perhaps you have an industry specific newsletter or are trying to reach legislators. In that case, you may want to include the technical details, butin most other cases, you should avoid it. Fit into a larger trend or story. You don't have to try to match up with the biggest headline of the week, but try to find some sort of trend, whether local, regional or national. If there is no trend, then ask yourself if  the story is important right now. Is there a policy decision to be made, other news stories about your cause at large, or any form of public polls taking place?
  • Una idea excelente para un vídeo quizá no pueda contarse mediante una foto o un correo electrónico. En cambio, los relatos se adaptan a las exigencias del correo electrónico, el vídeo, la presentación de PowerPoint, la fotografía e incluso los SMS.
  • RESULTS: Prompted and unprompted awareness of the organisation doubled; the website received over 70,000 unique visitors. Perception of MND was changed from being a chronic illness to a serious, sudden, debilitating and fatal one. The campaign raised over £230,000 for the MND Association directly (against a cost-covering target of £50,000) and prompted the government to match MNDA’s target of £7.5 million invested in research. MERITS: An early and inspirational example of joined-up thinking and an integrated campaign. But above all a relentlessly honest and emotional story telling the raw truth about the effect of MND on people suffering from it and their families.  OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: Since John’s journey the charity has continued with the approach, making much more use of the social and online tools now available. Patrick the incurable optimist and Alastair the optimist have both agreed to tell the story of their journeys with MND first-hand. They have also set themselves targets to reach before MND robs them of their abilities. Patrick is an artist and is aiming to paint a hundred portraits; Alastair, a musician, is recording a new album. They are helping to create a new dynamic in this kind of communication – placing the onus on direct storytelling and contact between supporters and people affected by the condition. Their stories are powerful, inspiring, direct, humbling and honest.
  • RESULTS: Prompted and unprompted awareness of the organisation doubled; the website received over 70,000 unique visitors. Perception of MND was changed from being a chronic illness to a serious, sudden, debilitating and fatal one. The campaign raised over £230,000 for the MND Association directly (against a cost-covering target of £50,000) and prompted the government to match MNDA’s target of £7.5 million invested in research. MERITS: An early and inspirational example of joined-up thinking and an integrated campaign. But above all a relentlessly honest and emotional story telling the raw truth about the effect of MND on people suffering from it and their families.  OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: Since John’s journey the charity has continued with the approach, making much more use of the social and online tools now available. Patrick the incurable optimist and Alastair the optimist have both agreed to tell the story of their journeys with MND first-hand. They have also set themselves targets to reach before MND robs them of their abilities. Patrick is an artist and is aiming to paint a hundred portraits; Alastair, a musician, is recording a new album. They are helping to create a new dynamic in this kind of communication – placing the onus on direct storytelling and contact between supporters and people affected by the condition. Their stories are powerful, inspiring, direct, humbling and honest.
  • Para mi, esto es ser fundraiser .

Diselo con... Diselo con... Presentation Transcript

  • Díselo con… una historiaSTORYTELLING: UN RECURSO IMPRESCINDIBLE PARA LA CAPTACIÓN DE FONDOS Barcelona, 19 de Septiembre de 2012
  • OBJETIVO DEL TALLER: Generar impacto: a través de las historias. Simple ideas are easier to understand. Ideas that are easier to understand are repeated. Ideas that are repeated change the world. Start with why
  • CONTENIDO Historia de las historias La esencia: la pasión de la misión Elementos de una buena historia Cómo explicar una buena historia Qué hacer con ella: cómo le damos difusión y visibilidad Ejemplos y… ejercicios Recursos de interés
  •  Historia de las historias
  •  Ya desde la prehistoria los humanos utilizaban los medios que tenían a su alcance para grabar historias en imágenes o con la escritura. Fuente imágenes: Izda. Grabado paleolítico – Revista de Ciències // Dcha. Grabado cueva Bellver Ric - Manacor
  •  La llegada de la escritura y el uso de medios estables las historias fueron grabadas, transcritas y compartidas a través de amplias regiones del mundo (shamanes, génesis, …). Fuente imágenes: Izda. Escritura china sobre huesos araculares // Dcha. Papiro egípcio IV a.C.
  •  Las historias orales han sido, y siguen siendo, un medio de transmisión de cuentos, moralejas, leyendas, fábulas,… que han pasado de generación en generación.
  •  A partir de los años 70 el storytelling se convierte en una técnica de marketing para vender más. También es utilizada como una herramienta política. Estos usos empiezan a despertar críticas y se acusa al storytelling de “limpiar mentes” para conseguir fines empresariales y/o políticos 1.1 Christian Salmon, en Storytelling, la máquina de fabricar historias y formatear las mentes
  •  La esencia: la pasión de la misión
  • Fuente: internalcomms.com.ar/storytelling/
  •  5 motivos para captar a través de las historias.RECORDAR ENTENDER ROMPER SIMPLIFICAR INSPIRAR BARRERAS
  •  Tenemos tendencia a racionalizar nuestra causa en programas, proyectos, actividades,… Una historia nos permite: o Acercarnos de nuevo a la esencia. o Poner en primer plano la misión. o Sin caer en descripciones, sino poniendo énfasis en la pasión que nos movió a actuar en su día. o Simplificar el mensaje. o Tener un mecanismo más eficaz para transmitir el mensaje.
  •  Una historia nos permite transmitir la PASIÓN de la MISIÓN. o Llegar a personas que no han vivido en primera persona una determinada causa. o Poner cara y acercar la multitud.
  • If I look at the mass I will never act. If I look at the one, I will. Mother Teresa
  •  Elementos de una buena historia
  • 1. La Pasión: Alma, emoción, valores.2. El protagonista: Tiene que haber un héroe o protagonista, con el cual, el público, debe sentirse identificado.3. El “malo”: Si no hay nada en juego, no hay historia. La pobreza en la comunidad o la falta de educación.4. Punto de inflexión: Es el momento donde la gente aprende, o se da cuenta de algo que de otro modo no tendría ¿Cuál es el significado que hay detrás de la historia?5. Transformación: ¿Qué ha cambiado a lo largo de la historia? Qué se ha conseguido, qué es diferente, qué podemos aprender de la historia y de la organización que la cuenta.Source: Adapted by Jake Emen from Katya Andresens and Macon Morehouses Nonprofit 911 Presentation "How to Tell your Story"
  • YouTube placed a video supportingcharity:water on its homepage,featuring an overlay encouragingYouTube users to donate money tothe cause. In that one day,charity:water received a whopping$10,000 from YouTube viewers.(March, 2009)
  • http://animaelteucv.blogspot.com.es/p/sergio.html
  •  Qué se consigue (además de los beneficios del propio recurso educativo para los jóvenes): o Repercusión en medios de comunicación (radio y TV) locales y autonómicos. o Contratación laboral de 4 de los 5 jóvenes que participaron en la iniciativa.
  • Acción: Mailing postal a una base de datos, propia, de 2.300 registros. Dos acciones diferenciadas a la misma base social. No se disponen de los datos de ingresos ni ROI. Fuente: se mantiene el anonimato a petición de la entidad.
  •  Para mi, esto es ser fundraiser.
  • Fuente: Fundación Josep Carreras.Especial agradecimiento Alexandra Carpentier de Changy Meca y al equipo dePrensa, Comunicación y E-Marketing de la Fundación Josep Carreras.
  •  Cómo explicar una buena historia
  •  Evita la exageración. No busques detalles insignificantes o quieras poner todas las historias en una. Simplifica. Busca la esencia. Ser bueno no es suficiente. Necesitas una buena historia que transmita emoción e interés. No demasiado cerca ni demasiado lejos, ten a tu audiencia en mente. Comparte tus sentimientos. Haz sentir a tus públicos objetivos cómo te sientes.
  •  No utilices estadísticas. No lo expliques desde un punto de vista técnico. No tienes delante un experto en derechos humanos, cooperación internacional, educación social,... Todo el mundo tiene una historia que explicar. Si no la sabes, búscala. Pide historias al equipo. A los voluntarios, al equipo técnico, a la junta, a los beneficiarios,...
  •  Qué hacer con ella: cómo le damos difusión y visibilidad
  •  Utiliza los medios y soportes que lleguen a tus PÚBLICOS OBJETIVO. Unifica mensajes y lanza la misma historia aunque los medios sean diferentes. No sólo es la historia: es la historia en la estrategia de comunicación y captación de fondos.
  • When I saw the first poster on the Underground, it stoppedme in my tracks. When I saw the last one 20 months laterit was like a punch in the stomach. Yet this shockingcampaign was not confected and gratuitous, but raw andhonest. It changed the sector, which sometimes misusesshock, by showing that it can be used without offence. Itwas also an excellent model of integrated campaigning.Stephen Cook, editor, Third Sector magazine, UK.
  •  Ejemplos y… EJERCICIOS.
  • http://www.boostup.org/en/students
  • ¿Cuál es la mejor historia quehas oído en tu organización?¿Por qué la recuerdas?
  • ¿Cuál es tu historia?
  • De vuelta a tu entidad, escribe 3 historias. Una de los fundadores (si es posible): qué les movió a crear la organización. Una de tu donante favorito (más tiempo, más implicado, …): por qué sigue con la entidad, qué le aporta, cómo se siente,… O de un súper-voluntario. Una de tus beneficiarios: cómo le/les ha cambiado la vida estar cerca y conocer a la organización y sus actuaciones.
  • Las historias son una gran oportunidad para: Emocionar. Llegar al corazón. Compartir. Transmitir. o Un testimonio, una cara, una frase, una fotografía,... o El alma, los valores de la entidad. Llevar la causa más lejos y buscar cómplices. En resumen, te obliga a explicar y recordar el POR QUÉ.
  •  Recursos de interés.
  • Recursos y links de interés: www.how-matters.org/2012/08/01/want-me-to-listen-tell-me-a-story www.slideshare.net/jlentfer/storytelling-and-me www.socialbrite.org/2011/04/21/8-great-examples-of-nonprofit- storytelling/ wiltonblake.com/nonprofit-storytelling/nonprofit-storytelling-resources/ www.startwithwhy.com Nonprofit 911 Presentation "How to Tell Your Story" Christian Salmon. Storytelling, la máquina de fabricar historias y formatear las mentes.
  • ¡Muchas gracias! Irene Borràs CAUSES that change the world www.causes.es iborras@causes.cates.linkedin.com/pub/irene-borras/17/392/88 @ireneborras