Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Lori West: Presentation at IRD conference at Emory University

865

Published on

Presented by Lori West, IRD Gulf Region Director, during session on Community Disaster Preparedness & Response at Emory University on Sept. 30, 2010

Presented by Lori West, IRD Gulf Region Director, during session on Community Disaster Preparedness & Response at Emory University on Sept. 30, 2010

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
865
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Rebuilds=420 homes X $60,000 Rehabs=860 homes X $10,000 Volunteers=$20 per hour X 7 million hours=$140 million
  • Rebuilds=420 homes X $60,000 Rehabs=860 homes X $10,000 Volunteers=$20 per hour X 7 million hours=$140 million
  • Rebuilds=420 homes X $60,000 Rehabs=860 homes X $10,000 Volunteers=$20 per hour X 7 million hours=$140 million
  • Rebuilds=420 homes X $60,000 Rehabs=860 homes X $10,000 Volunteers=$20 per hour X 7 million hours=$140 million
  • Transcript

    1. Mississippi Community Development Programs: In Response to Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf Oil Spill IRD US
    2. •Background •Programs •Principles for Successful Community Development •Summary of Hurricane Katrina Lessons Learned •The Gulf Oil Spill- Our Latest Challenge IRD US Overview
    3. • Where – IRD implements a wide range of programs in the Gulf Coast area. • When we started – After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, IRD emerged as a leader in rebuilding several Mississippi counties in which 70,000 homes had been destroyed IRD US Overview
    4. Internal Organization •Local staff with strong personal ties to human services community •22 case managers NeighborWorks trained in 12 areas •Community Resource Centers of Harrison and Jackson Counties with staff of 50 located in 2 offices Strategic Partnerships •Built multi-service agency with limited resources and funding from multiple sources: Mississippi Development Authority, Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, Mississippi Home Corporation, Gulf Coast Community Foundation , United Way, NeighborWorks •Proving invaluable to donors by providing a central repository of data Community Organization •Managing Long Term Recovery Agencies in Jackson & Harrison Counties •Collaboration with multiple public and private agencies •South Mississippi VOAD •CARRI (The Community and Regional Resilience Institute) IRD US Overview
    5. Homeless Prevention Homeownership Counseling Crisis and Trauma Detection Youth Development Home Buyer Assistance Affordable Housing Locater Financial Counseling & Foreclosure Prevention Business Training Rehab & Rebuilding
    6. Programs Implemented Construction • Welcome Home • Long Term Recovery • Coming Home Collaborative Housing Resource Centers • Housing Resource Management • Homeless Prevention and Rapid ReHousing • HEART Database Home Buyer Assistance • Mississippi Alternative Housing Pilot Program • REACH Mississippi • MyHome MyCoast
    7. Programs Implemented Economic Development • CLIMB MicroBusiness Youth Development and Job Training • CLIMB YouthBuild
    8. •The expected increase in lifetime total income of all IRD US Youth Build is $15,400,000 •An average High School Dropout costs $292,000 in lower tax revenues and increases in necessary social services •1 of 10 High School Dropouts was incarcerated on average versus 1/33 of those to receive their High School Degree •$120 million national investment in YouthBuild expected to produce a net return of $1.3 Billion for 2009/2010
    9. CLIMB Creating livelihoods for Individuals through MicroBusiness • 66 business owners completed program • 59 of those received the technical assistance and access to funding necessary to create or expand existing small businesses. • 91% of all clients served have been low income residents • On average each small business created an additional 3 jobs over a period of 2 years
    10. •989 clients attended Homebuyer Pre and/or Post Purchase Classes •596 clients that received Housing Counseling purchased housing •Pre-Approved an additional 985 Mississippi Cottage residents for the purchase of their cottage Financial Counseling & Home Buyer Education
    11. REACH Mississippi •138 First time homebuyer’s assisted into Homeownership •Total sales of $16,050,000 •Est. economic impact of $3,662,224 •Est. annual recurring impact of $1,187,766 in taxes and additional local revenue
    12. •Assisted 458 Families into Homeownership under this program which provided an immediate economic impact of $8,212,398, and Pre-Approved an additional 985 for a projected impact of $17,662,035 over the life of the program. •Provided an estimated yearly savings of $9,450,000 in associated social services for Homelessness in the estimated 252 families housed in MEMA Cottages who would have otherwise been homeless. •$20,762,666 in estimated sales value to homeowners Mississippi Alternative Housing Pilot Program
    13. HPRP (Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing): •Financial rental assistance up to 18 months to homeless clients or those at risk of homelessness. •NeighborWorks trained case managers, implemented foreclosure prevention program to assist clients at risk of becoming homeless. Over 50 families have received assistance
    14. •Coming Home Collaborative •Home Sweet Home
    15. Hurricane Related Repairs •599 Rehabs and Rebuilds combined with an estimated direct impact of $24,242,500 in local income and 248 jobs supported •One year impact estimated $20,504,000 of Reconstruction Projects •One year estimated impact of Rebuilds $3,738,500 •$8,644,118 in direct assistance provided towards housing projects to date •$12,966,177 estimated value of volunteer hours contributed to date •Annual recurring economic impact of these projects estimated at $3,381,840 in local income and taxes To Date: Welcome Home & Harrison County Long Term Recovery
    16. Hurricane Related Repairs •153 additional Rehabs/Rebuilds to be completed in the next 12 months •$7,438,555 in projected direct contributions to projects •Estimated yearly recurring local income of these projects to be $676,368 •$284,796 in monetary value of projected volunteer hours Projected:
    17. Principles for Successful Community Development
    18. Principles of Successful Community Development Engage Local Communities to determine unmet need Move from Needs Assessment to program Achieve Consensus Among Network of Service Providers Build Political Capital, Collaborations, and Ability to Leverage Funding
    19. Engaging Local Communities •Knowledge of Culture and Community •Staff with local ties •Existing relationships with community leaders •Collaboration •Partner with other Agencies •Leverage existing man power with experience in disasters •Assessment •Collect data and gauge the needs of community •Identify immediate, mid-term, and long term needs
    20. Moving from Needs Assessment to Community Re-Development •Identifying population served •Working poor, the elderly, the disabled and other low income groups •Identifying the unmet needs •Affordable housing •Economic stability •Link clients to Resources • Identify current resources in the community •Submit proposals to fill gaps between resources and needs
    21. Achieve Consensus •Lead in creating partnerships to address the unmet needs •Long Term Recovery Committee •Community Resource Coalition •South Mississippi VOAD (Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster) •Sustain existing networks •Collective knowledge and goodwill •Prepare for disaster response •Preserve the lessons learned
    22. Build political capital, collaborations and the ability to leverage funding to address community needs •Identify and Inform Political Decision Makers •Demonstrate community impact of government funding • Provide Economic Values for Programs • Short and Long-Term Impacts •Building relationships with local businesses, government agencies, and other local initiatives •Securing financial and management resources
    23. Hurricane Katrina Lessons Learned
    24. • Think, Plan, and Act Long Term • Collaborate and Compete • Focus on Results • Be Totally Committed • Work with Democracy and Governance Systems • Be Mindful of Timing • Define the Meaning of “Long Term” Recovery
    25. The Gulf Oil Spill Our Latest Challenge
    26. Principles of Successful Community Development Engage Local Communities to determine unmet need Move from Needs Assessment to Program Development Achieve Consensus Among Network of Service Providers Build Political Capital, Collaborations, and Ability to Leverage Funding
    27. Engage Local Communities Our role as a responsible community organizer in response to Hurricane Katrina identified us as a Lead Agency in the community and provided immediate access to invaluable information through: • In Coordination with South MS VOAD, IRD Co hosted and organized a Oil Spill Response Summit in less than three weeks. Many national organizations were present and nearly every local community organizations was present among many other sectors. (community residents) • Gulf Coast Business Council (Businesses) • Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (Social Service Agencies) • MEMA, FEMA, BP (Government)
    28. Move from Needs Assessment to Program Development Our experience in assessments and working knowledge of the residents we serve as the Housing Resource Centers of Harrison and Jackson Counties and Community Resource Centers of the lower six counties allowed us to quickly: • Qualify tertiary effects • Discuss different needs of Man-Made vs. Natural Disaster • (ecological, economical, and human effects • Identify gaps in services • Minimize duplication of efforts • Promote better use of available resources
    29. Achieve Consensus A consensus is largely achieved through our networks of service providers such as South MS VOAD, LTRC, CRC, MSIDTF etc… provided by the clients that we serve: • Discuss common concerns • Identify gaps in services • Promote better use of available resources • Minimize unnecessary duplication of efforts between human service and government agencies
    30. Build Political Capital, Collaborations, and Ability to Leverage Funding As a Lead Agency in Long Term Recovery, Community Resource Coalitions, and SM VOAD we have created the ability to quickly respond in times of Natural and Man-Made Disasters: • Organize community response • Produce policy and funding recommendations • Leverage resources through a united voice with collaborating agencies • Provide assistance and referrals to existing programs • Program development in response to unmet need
    31. In conclusion Summary slide….
    32. The lessons learned and principles formed in response to Hurricane Katrina served us well in dealing with The Gulf Oil Spill. Our community is more resilient by having the networks that grew out of Hurricane Katrina as we were able to respond with existing services as well as prepare proposals for funding in days instead of the months prior to the organization resulting from Hurricane Katrina. IRD has led the way in creating a more capable and resilient community capable of responding in times of Disaster.
    33. Contact Lori West, IRD Gulf Region Director 228-864-6677, Office lwest@irdgulfcoast.org 1223 30th Avenue, Suite A Gulfport, MS 39501

    ×