Katherine Marshall: Keynote at IRD event at Emory University
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Katherine Marshall: Keynote at IRD event at Emory University

on

  • 3,526 views

Katherine Marshall is a Senior Fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, and Visiting Professor in the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University. She is also ...

Katherine Marshall is a Senior Fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, and Visiting Professor in the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University. She is also Executive Director of the World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD), an NGO that works to bridge the worlds of development and religion.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,526
Views on SlideShare
3,523
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

1 Embed 3

http://ird.dev 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Katherine Marshall: Keynote at IRD event at Emory University Katherine Marshall: Keynote at IRD event at Emory University Presentation Transcript

  • Communities, Peace, and Development: Perspectives through a Lens of Religion Candler School of Theology, Emory University and International Relief and Development (IRD) September 29,2010 Katherine Marshall, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, Georgetown University WFDD
  • Presentation Outline
    • Two parts, with a brief introduction (definition issues, where they matter)
    • 6 Stories reflecting personal “lessons” linked to communities and development
    • A challenge and a puzzle: fragile states and religion
    • Some lessons and challenges
    • How to draw on complex experience?
    • Harmonization challenges
    • Peacebuilding and development
    • Fragile states, peace and governance: bringing religion into the conversation
  • Caveats and Approach
    • Religion/faith/spirituality is a huge subject, comprising large and complex worlds: never forget diversity
    • Terminology is fraught: religion, faith, spirituality, secular, are all contested terms
    • Ethics and values are intertwined in the debates, with special sensitivities around human dignity, respect for life, human rights and responsibilities
    • Religion and culture: where does one end, the other begin?
    • “ Development” is also a complex world of institutions and ideas, in flux and with many different approaches; add peacebuilding to the mix
    • My perspective: a practitioner, with a strong interdisciplinary focus, experience in intersecting worlds
  • Navigating Tensions around Religion
  • Stories and Communities
    • Reflecting on some enduring lessons from development history
    • Top down (leadership) is necessary at times but it carries huge risks;
    • Engagement, participation, and ownership by communities are keys to success.
    • “ Country driven” and “empowerment” are mantras of the hour.
    • But we need to dig into some of the deeper questions the terms raise: empower whom and how? Tough issues and choices.
    • What has religion to do with it and to offer ?
  • Six tales: 1. Mauritania, camels and donkeys: Rediscovering and seeing with new eyes
  •  
  • 2. Madagascar: Ranching in Tsiroanomandidy: cultural blindness, politics, and change
  • 3. Rwanda and the Mutara Project
    • Rational policy
    • Cursed by the bishop
    • Seething tension
    • Theme of land
    • Poisonous relationships behind civility
  •  
  • 4. Botswana, Tribal Grazing Lands Policy
    • Keeping eyes on the poor
  • Making it meaningful
    • Building tools
    • The enigmas of economics
    • Complexities of consultation, participation, empowerment
  • 5. Aceh: The tsunami and peace
  • 6. Peace, Religion, and Women
  • Moral: the centrality of gender
  • Fragile States
  • The Challenge
    • The “Bottom billion”
    • Least developed
    • Fragile States
    • Failing States
    • LICUS = Low income countries under stress
    • Poorly performing states
    • Collier’s paradigm change: what it means
  •  
  • Fragile states and communities: 4 challenges
    • How to draw on complex experience?
    • Harmonization challenges
    • Peacebuilding and development
    • Fragile states, peace and governance: Bringing religion into the conversation
  • 1. How to draw on community experience?
    • “ The faith picture is far more chaotic and organic than the development industry expects and would like it to be. This is true for all communities and community structures, but perhaps even more so for the faith world. Bureaucracies want order and structure. They also want fast results. Moving faster is likely to be less effective in the long term, seen from the community perspective. It is essential to take into account how communities see realities and their priorities .”
    • Mark Webster Nov 2008 interview http://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/essays/view?author=1813&project=23
  • Elements in solutions
    • Reflections on local government and decentralization
    • The missing middle, between community and national, national and global
    • Mapping and knowledge
    • “ FBOs” and congregations
    • Joint learning initiatives
  • 2. Aid harmonization challenges
    • Aid harmonization as a theme (get a grip)
    • Paris, Rome, Accra declarations
    • Three One’s
    • Versus: let a thousand flowers bloom, social entrepreneurship
    • Move away from projects to SWAPs and global funding
    • Public private debates: balance and tools
  • AIDS stakeholders and donors in one African country MOH MOEC MOF PMO PRIVATE SECTOR CIVIL SOCIETY LOCALGVT NACP CTU CCAIDS INT NGO PEPFAR Norad CIDA RNE GTZ Sida WB UNICEF UNAIDS WHO CF GFATM USAID NCTP HSSP GFCCP DAC CCM T-MAP 3/5 SWAP UNTG PRSP US$200M US$290 M US$ 50M US$ 60M
  • 3. Peacebuilding and development
    • Conflict, governance and leadership
    • Separate worlds: same challenge?
    • Old paradigm of stages
    • Reality of messy overlap
  • 4. Fragile states and governance: bringing religion into the conversation
    • Remarkable absence
    • The good, the bad, the ugly, the beautiful
    • Preconceptions: politics, hierarchy
    • Skittishness on corruption
    • Role of Muslim societies and significance
    • Gender issues
  • What might a deeper appreciation of religion’s role and more active engagement offer in terms of better policies and programs in fragile states?
    • Knowledge and reflection: WDR as an example
    • At the table or on the menu?
    • Rapid intervention/swat teams
    • More women
    • Dialogue on tough issues including development strategies
    • Linking community and policy
  • Development, peace, and faith: not an easy match
    • Context: Changing approaches to religion in various settings
    • 12 year journey as a “case study” and pioneer: the World Bank and faiths; UN agencies, bilaterals, foundations, universities, all showing increased interest in religion from many perspectives
    • Doubts still, but also openings
    • World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD) as one pioneer
    • Strategic focus and policy dialogue
    • Sectoral, topic focus and community engagement
  • Ideas on paths forward
    • Strong country focus is a prerequisite for real progress
    • Evidence – amassing and using
    • Discernment and political antennae
    • Dialogue on tough issues
    • Purposeful thinking on networks
    • Global forums: navigate, select
    • Interfaith?
  • More resources
    • Two books of case studies, most recent Development and Faith: Where Mind, Heart and Soul work Together
    • Berkley Center Regional and Issues reviews, practitioner interviews; http://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/programs/religion-and-global-development wn.edu
    • Newsweek/Washington Post On Faith: “Faith in Action”, weekly column
    • World Bank, Development Dialogue on Values and Ethics (DDVE)
  •