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IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies
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IRD Social Media Summit: Social Media Policies

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presentation by Mike Krempasky, Edelman

presentation by Mike Krempasky, Edelman

Published in: Education
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  • 1. Overview of Social Media Policies and Their Role<br />Mike Krempasky, EVP, Edelman Digital Public Affairs<br />
  • 2. Social media POLICY<br />
  • 3. Really? Another policy?<br />Social media has fundamentally changed the communications landscape.<br />These changes provide real opportunity – and real pitfalls.<br />"Spectacular achievements are always preceded by unspectacular preparation.” – Roger Staubach<br />3<br />
  • 4. It Protects You<br />dooce<br />   [doos]  verb, dooced <br />–verb (used with object) 1.to fire or sack an employee for the contents of a weblog: She got dooced for writing about her coworkers. <br />Origin: 2002: weblogger (and current HGTV personality and author) Heather Armstrong, author of www.dooce.com is fired from her graphic design job.<br />
  • 5. It Protects the Organization’s Reputation<br />2007: Whole Foods CEO John Mackey is caught using a pseudonym online to attack a competitor in financial news forums.<br />After significant reputational harm, Whole Foods moves to restrict all employee communications online.<br />5<br />
  • 6. It Can Protect Much More Than the Organization’s Reputation<br />6<br />65 years ago: the famous challenge of information security<br />2010: a new challenge of information security<br />
  • 7. The Benefits of a Social Media Policy Go Beyond the Defensive<br />Guidance drives participation<br />Participation drives connection<br />Connection drives relationship<br />Relationship drives partnership<br />
  • 8. Introducing the DRAFT IRD Social Media Policy<br />8<br />
  • 9. Guiding Principles<br />9<br />Transparency<br /><ul><li>The keystone for approaching social media.
  • 10. Identify yourself, be clear about your motivation.</li></ul>The Personal vs. the Professional<br /><ul><li>In social media, that line is often artificial and demands caution.
  • 11. What you do in your personal capacity can reflect on the organization.
  • 12. Be clear when you’re speaking as IRD and when you’re not…
  • 13. …but remember that others can hear you quite differently.</li></ul>1<br />2<br />
  • 14. Guiding Principles<br />10<br />Social Media as an IRD employee<br /><ul><li>Proprietary or confidential information is NOT appropriate for social media.
  • 15. Like IRD, online communities are global and diverse with a range of opinions and beliefs.
  • 16. You have resources available: the Communications Department & IRD’s hotline.
  • 17. Safety first–of our programs and coworkers.</li></ul>Good Social Media Citizenship<br /><ul><li>Respect not only laws, but generally accepted best practices online.
  • 18. Give credit where credit is due.
  • 19. The Internet never forgets.</li></ul>3<br />4<br />
  • 20. Guiding Principles<br />11<br />The Landscape Has Changed…But Good Behavior Has Not.<br /><ul><li>The Internet can bring a great sense of freedom, to be sure. But everything you know about good conduct, respectful interactions with colleagues, coworkers and partners is just as important online as off.
  • 21. In short: the employee conduct guidelines still apply.</li></ul>5<br />

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