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Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
Triple-S Research on Systemic Change
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Triple-S Research on Systemic Change

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Presented at the Triple-S Annual Review and Planning Meeting (ARAP), Fort Portal Uganda, 6th-11th May 2013

Presented at the Triple-S Annual Review and Planning Meeting (ARAP), Fort Portal Uganda, 6th-11th May 2013

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • – rural water services are not being provided effectively and sustainably
  • Sector dynamics and political economy focuses on hardware provision Weak government and low political priority Poorly harmonized donors and NGOs Fragmented and projectised approaches Limited capacity to learn, innovate and change
  • IRC / Triple-S seeks to understand and take concerted action to change the system across these levels, multiple-actors, multi-faceted problems and issues towards the update of a service delivery approach. We are proponents of a specific process approach that entails:An outcomes based way of working,Implemented by multi-disciplinary teams in countries, With a strong focus on communications and advocacy/invocacy,While we to work with (existing) MSPs / LA’s, To engender a learning and adaptive mind-setThrough undertaking experiments to help stakeholders jointly examine and understandThe multi-faceted problems that we face in achieving services that last (for everyone)Based upon the belief that facilitating an accelerated cycle of learning and adaption will lead to more sustainable services as actors align and harmonise their efforts to maximum effect.
  • IRC / Triple-S seeks to understand and take concerted action to change the system across these levels, multiple-actors, multi-faceted problems and issues towards the update of a service delivery approach. We are proponents of a specific process approach that entails:An outcomes based way of working,Implemented by multi-disciplinary teams in countries, With a strong focus on communications and advocacy/invocacy,While we to work with (existing) MSPs / LA’s, To engender a learning and adaptive mind-setThrough undertaking experiments to help stakeholders jointly examine and understandThe multi-faceted problems that we face in achieving services that last (for everyone)Based upon the belief that facilitating an accelerated cycle of learning and adaption will lead to more sustainable services as actors align and harmonise their efforts to maximum effect.
  • This systemic change study therefore seeks to examine and give this approach to systemic change a name. To buttress the approach with no name with rigorous, academically-grounded insights from the literature and tools from systems theory and the complexity sciences that help us understand:whether this approach Is relevant and valid what can be improved in the way we seek to affect systemic change
  • As agreed in Kampala at the Research gathering last September, the focus in the country work streams would be on discrete studies of one section of systemic change that has been a main component of the Triple-S approach through out – the Learning Alliance experiment. The purpose is to understand whether this key aspect of engendering a learning & adaptive sector warrants the effort put into it. It is a critical and concrete ‘slice’ of the approach to systemic change that speaks directly to engendering, facilitation and embedding of a learning & adaptive sector.The intention is to learn what are areas for improvement in this approach and what resources are required to embed this approach going forward if MSPs are the preferred way of working due to their potential to lead to more sustainable outcomes in terms of SDA.The Learning Facilitators have been playing a key role in this background work that is critical to socialising the concept of SDA by seeking out and working with (existing) platforms, or working with partners to establish new ones in some cases, getting SDA onto the platform agendas. The efforts to convene, help set agendas, develop content for sharing and reflection, facilitate gatherings, act as feedback links to critical sector actors at different levels and now in bringing the experiments into those arenas to generate consensus in identifying worthy solutions is a highly valued role. These efforts to demonstrate / embed a learning mind-set and behaviour that desires information to inform action in accelerated cycles of learning and improvement will lead to change towards better lasting services.
  • Ground this IRC Triple-S approach in the academic literature of complexity sciences. We will use and adapt tools that will enable us to model ‘socio-technical’ environment (the actors, institutions, policies, supply mechanisms, etc) that comprise the rural water services delivery system. The process of developing these agent-based models is an iterative process. We will work with Delft Technical University (TPM) and Stanford University (Change Labs) guiding us academically. Their methods and tools will be adapted to generate visual models of the system in Uganda and Ghana – though it is the iterative process of building a model that is the learning element, not the model itself, that is the visual vehicle around which to build the conversations & reflections of what comprises the system and where weaknesses, areas for improvement exist. These tools are used regularly in other sectors such as energy, harbour management, etc with similar characteristics to water services : multiple, independent actors at various levels interconnected through converging and diverging interests, policies that guide behaviours, political-economic interests, resource flows, etc.Modelling a complex socio-technical environment to see the behaviours of these agents at the different levels and the results of their behaviours within certain boundary conditions offers the potential to identify problem-fixes such as increased finance to local level institutions; shorter down times; (better) supply-chains.
  • Ground this IRC Triple-S approach in the academic literature of complexity sciences. We will use and adapt tools that will enable us to model ‘socio-technical’ environment (the actors, institutions, policies, supply mechanisms, etc) that comprise the rural water services delivery system. The process of developing these agent-based models is an iterative process. We will work with Delft Technical University (TPM) and Stanford University (Change Labs) guiding us academically. Their methods and tools will be adapted to generate visual models of the system in Uganda and Ghana – though it is the iterative process of building a model that is the learning element, not the model itself, that is the visual vehicle around which to build the conversations & reflections of what comprises the system and where weaknesses, areas for improvement exist. These tools are used regularly in other sectors such as energy, harbour management, etc with similar characteristics to water services : multiple, independent actors at various levels interconnected through converging and diverging interests, policies that guide behaviours, political-economic interests, resource flows, etc.Modelling a complex socio-technical environment to see the behaviours of these agents at the different levels and the results of their behaviours within certain boundary conditions offers the potential to identify problem-fixes such as increased finance to local level institutions; shorter down times; (better) supply-chains.
  • The ask to the country teams:work jointly in person & at distance to identify the relevant agents, behaviours and boundary conditions of the system (the rural water services delivery system) in your country. Act as reviewers of models, helping to identify what works / does not work Facilitate and support interactions with relevant sector actors from the MSPs / LA’s at the various levels to gain their insights and validation of the models that are generated – an important part of embedding and scaling the findings of any of our research experiments
  • Transcript

    • 1. TRIPLE-SRESEARCH ON SYSTEMIC CHANGEBackground, Purpose, ScopeFort Portal,UgandaMay 2013
    • 2. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …2THE PROBLEMSource: M. Wegelin, KenyaSource: Stef Smits, Mozambique
    • 3. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …3UNDERLYING CAUSESSource: Stef Smits, Uganda
    • 4. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …4WHAT WE SEEK TO UNDERSTANDTriple-S seeks understand and take concertedaction to change the rural water services deliverysystem across these levels comprised of multiple-actors, multi-faceted problems and issuesWe seek to understand whether our approach tothis systemic change is effective & warranted
    • 5. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …5WHAT WE SEEK TO UNDERSTANDThe ‘Approach’ entails:• outcomes based approach,• multi-disciplinary teams,• focus on communications and advocacy/ invocacy,• working with and through (existing) MSPs / LA’s,• To engender a learning and adaptive mind-set• Through undertaking experiments to help stakeholders jointlyexamine and understand• multi-faceted problems hampering achievement of servicesthat last (for everyone)• Based upon the belief that facilitating an accelerated cycle oflearning and adaption will lead to more sustainable services asactors align and harmonise their efforts to maximum effect.
    • 6. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …6What we already know & do
    • 7. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …7BACKGROUND• Learning on Triple-S takesplace in two areas which wecall Narratives.– One narrative tells the storyabout sector change towardssustainability.– The second narrative tellsthe story of the process toenable this change.• These narratives areinterdependent but requirelearning in different ways.2: The Triple-SNarrativeThe Approach1: The ReliableWater NarrativeThe Triple-S PrinciplesFrameworkWhoisLearningHowCycle ofLearningFor generating impactPERFORMANCEFor enablingimpact
    • 8. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …8THE NARRATIVESNarrative 1: Reliable Water Narrative 2: Triple-S ApproachThe learning will test whetherthere is movement towards thePrinciples by means of changesin discourse, new ideasemerging, changing practicesand policiesThe learning will test whetherthe Triple-S methods apply thevalues that have been chosen toaddress complexity
    • 9. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …9THE PRINCIPLES FRAMEWORK:A TOOL TO GUIDE CHANGETRIPLE-SPRINCIPLESFRAMEWORKLevels of interventionWater serviceprovisionIntermediate National InternationalServiceDeliveryApproachLearning andadaptivecapacityHarmonisationand AlignmentUgandaGhanaUgandaUgandaInternationalInternationalGhanaOtherresearch /literatureSUMMARYSYNTHESIS
    • 10. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …10WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE, CONTINUEDSeptember 2013Learning Exchange & Research Gathering inUgandaStart of the re-planning kicked off and thefollowing agreements made:
    • 11. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …11THE WHOLE MODEL
    • 12. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …12THE WHOLE MODELSDASDIChange!FLOWHPMAM4WDoc ReformSDIOriginal picture: Rachel Cardone 2011
    • 13. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …13THE ‘SYSTEMIC CHANGE’ STUDYNaming & buttressing this approach through application of theoryand rigorously developed tools & methods of systems thinking
    • 14. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …14FOCUS OF COUNTRY WORK STREAM STUDIESDiscrete element:the ‘off-stage’ workof facilitation of &engagement withmulti-stakeholderplatforms / LearningAlliances for uptake& embedding
    • 15. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …15SCOPE OF THE SYSTEMIC CHANGESTUDYWork with Delft Technical University & Stanford U Change Labs ascentres of excellent on systems thinking, complexity sciences andsystematic methods for studying complex systems such as energy,water, industry.Ground this IRC Triple-S approach in theacademic literature of complexity sciences.Apply the theory and demonstrated tools forunderstanding the system in two cases :Ghana and Uganda
    • 16. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …16SCOPE OF THE SYSTEMIC CHANGESTUDYJune 2013 – December 2013: buttress our approach inacademic literature of complexity sciences / complexadaptive systems/ systemic change, etcAug 2013 – Nov 2014:• adapt and apply tools to model ‘socio-technical’environment – based upon the Uganda and Ghana ruralwater services systems• Conduct the joint learning to model generation throughinteractive & iterative learning process of developing(agent-based) models of the country ‘system’ for waterservices deliveryOutputs: Approach is grounded (even validated?); systematic andinclusive generation of representative models and learningprocess to identify domains for change within the system – toolsto support our learning about this, publications that capture
    • 17. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …17COLLABORATING WITH UWS & GWS work jointly in person & at distance – the website, the newsletter,relationship management Act as reviewers – how do we consolidate our wins? Are we puttingit all on Everyone, Forever? What about RWSN? AdvisoryCommittee? Facilitate and support interactions – the experiments? synthesisacross countries? final products?Timing:June 2013 – 2014: regular distance interactions in the formative stages ofmodel development; support in obtaining relevant data; interactions percountry / yearJune 2014 – November 2014: on interaction per country / year
    • 18. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …18
    • 19. WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …19

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