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Triple s ghana presentation @ MOLE XXIII conference 23rd august ,2012
 

Triple s ghana presentation @ MOLE XXIII conference 23rd august ,2012

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A presentation by the Triple-S Ghana during the MOLE XXIII Conference held in Tamale from August 22nd to 24th ,2012. The presentation was on the topic , “Sustainability model for wash service ...

A presentation by the Triple-S Ghana during the MOLE XXIII Conference held in Tamale from August 22nd to 24th ,2012. The presentation was on the topic , “Sustainability model for wash service delivery: Experiences from East Gonja District”. The presentation was done by Jeremiah Atengdem, Regional Learning Facilitator for the Northern Region.

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Triple s ghana presentation @ MOLE XXIII conference 23rd august ,2012 Triple s ghana presentation @ MOLE XXIII conference 23rd august ,2012 Presentation Transcript

  • SUSTAINABILITY MODEL FOR WASH SERVICE DELIVERY:Experiences from East Gonja District Jeremiah A. Atengdem, Presented At MOLE XXIII on 23rd August 2012, Regional International Conference Centre, Learning University of Development Studies, Tamale Facilitator, Triple-S
  • THE SUSTAINABLE SERVICES AT SCALE INITIATIVE •A global learning initiative to improve on water services •Ghana and Uganda selected as learning countries •Supporting the rural water sector in Ghana to develop and test innovative elements improved water services and to address systemic bottlenecks to providing sustained water services •This is done through: oAction research oPiloting and testing innovations oMulti-stakeholder dialogue oSector change and reforms •The project is hosted in Ghana by CWSAWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …2
  • BUSINESS AS USUAL OR DELIVERING A SERVICE Business as usual Service Delivery ApproachImplement Implement Implement Implement Replace Upgrade Upgrade Time Investment Investment (capital (operational Service expenditure) expenditure) levelWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …3
  • A service means water users receive • An agreed quantity of water • An agreed quality of water • An agreed distance/time • An agreed level of reliabilityWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …4
  • What makes a service work? Clear sector policies Well defined institutional roles and responsibilities Strong planning, coordination, leadership Relevant management models Long-term support and monitoring Good implementation practices Finance for life-cycle costs Appropriate technology Learning and innovation WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …5
  • WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …6
  • Triple-S Ghana Intervention Framework Gaps and bottlenecks Intervention modules National level - normative and policy •Operational documents and guidelines • Different, fragmented and uncoordinated •Sector harmonization and coordination approaches •Capacity support to CWSA • Unreliable data on functionality and service authority services Intermediate •Functionality tracking, sustainability and • Unclear role of local government in the level – water service monitoring system delivery of water services •Planning, budgeting and tariff setting • Insufficient expenditure on direct support and capital maintenance •Capacity support for local water • Weak DA support to service providers governance level Service provider • Non compliance to national standards and norms •Citizen government engagement on • Low functionality and unreliable service water services • Weak service provider institutions •Capacity support for service providers • Ineffective supply chain and technical •Innovative options for capital services maintenance • Lack of accountability and transparency in •Supply chain and technical services service deliveryWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …7
  • Triple-S scheme of work National Level •Development of indicators for measureme and reporting of functionality and service levels •Support to SSDP and SWaP development to promote sector coordination •Support to CWSA to finalise operating documents,NCWSP,DOM to reflect service delivery for application ser LevelStrengthening of spareparts District Levelupply chain and provision of • Monitoring and reporting ofechnical services functionality and service levelSupport DA to assess user •Capacity support to serviceatisfaction of water services authority-DOMsing Sense Maker •Application of standards, norms, guidelines, operating documents and feedback to policy •Promote learning through existing platforms in the district •Testing of innovations for uptake by the sector WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …8
  • Application of SDA in East GonjaEnablingenvironment Pol Eco Soc Tech Env Legal WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …9
  • RESULTS OF BASELINE: FUNCTIONALITY OF POINT SOURCESWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …10
  • SERVICE LEVELS SCOREIndicators Number of point sources meeting indicators by Area Council Bunjai Kpariba Kpembe Kulaw Makango/ Salaga n=1 n=6 n=37 n=32 Kafaba n= 30 n=16Reliable( not more than 18 2 21 23 8 18days downtime in a year)Distance(not more than 1 4 28 28 10 26500m)Quality(GSBs standards) 4 33 30 15 30Crowding(not more than 4 2 4 1300 persons for boreholesand 150 for handdug well)Quantity(20lpcd) Insufficient dataWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …11
  • SERVICE LEVELService level Description of service level Level of service delivered by point sourcesHigh level service People access a minimum of 60 lpcd of high quality water on demand. Reliability is 95%Intermediate level people access a min of 40 lpcd of acceptable quality water from an improved source, at a distance less than 500m. The number of peopleservice using the hand pump is 300 in the case of a bore hole and 150 in the case of a hand dug well and reliability is 95%.Basic level service People access a minimum of 20 lpcd of acceptable quality water (GSB) from an improved source, at a distance no more than 500 m. The number of people using the hand pump is 300 in the case of a bore hole and 150 in the case of a hand dug well and reliability is 95%Sub-standard level People access service that is improvement on having no service at all, but 36%service that fails to meet the basic standards on one or more criteria (quantity, quality, reliability, distance, max number of people served)No service People access water from insecure or unimproved sources, or sources 64% that are too distant (> 500m), too time consuming, or are of poor quality (less than GSB standard)WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …12
  • FUNCTIONALITY OF PIPED SCHEMESIndicators Number of piped Number of systems standpipes N=8Functional 7 23Partial functional 1Non-functional 37Total 8 60WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …13
  • SERVICE INDICATORS OF PIPES SCHEMESIndicators Number of piped systems meeting indicators N=8Reliable( not more than 18 days in a year) 1Distance(not more than 500m) 5Quality(GSBs standards) 8Crowding(not more than 300 persons for 6boreholes and 150 for handdug well)Quantity(20lpcd) No dataWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …14
  • WATSAN COMMITTEES THAT HAVE MET THE INDICATORS N=60 % of WATSAN Number of WATSANIndicator Committee meeting Indicator Committee meetinggroup indicators indicators A well-qualified, trained and experienced gender balanced WATSAN is in place 8 13%Governance Technical, Administrative and financial Reports areand kept and read out to the Community at least once 27 45%management every six months There is no political and chieftaincy influences in the 52 87% composition of the WATSAN or WSDB Spare parts are available to enable maintenance 24 40% Area mechanics are available to enable maintenance 25 42% Corrective maintenance is executed in an effective way 37 62%Operations Periodic maintenance is executed in an effective way 46 77% Water Quality Sampling and Analysis services are performed on half yearly basis by recognised 37 62% institutions Annual income from water sales exceeds total 32 53% annual expenditureFinancial There is sound financial management, accountingmanagement and auditing 10 17% Tariff setting is taking into account the lifecycle costs 13 22% DWST monitors O&M of water facilities in terms of financial, technical and administrative performance,Support SERVICES THAT LAST 14 23% WATER including periodic audits, and provides support …15
  • WSDBS THAT HAVE MET THE INDICATORS Number of PipedIndicator group Indicator Systems meeting indicators A well-qualified, experienced and trained team Technical, Administrative and financial Reports are kept and read out to theGovernance Community at least once every six monthsandmanagement There is no political and chieftaincy influences in the composition of the 6 WATSAN or WSDB WSDB meetings organised and minutes kept 1 Private sector provides the needed support to WSDB 1 Preparation of workplan and budget for O & MOperations Water Quality Sampling and Analysis services are performed on half yearly basis 2 by recognised institutions and paid for through tarrif Annual income from water sales exceeds total annual expenditure 6Financial There is sound financial management, accounting and auditingmanagement Tariff setting is taking into account the lifecycle costs Interference of MMDAs in tarrif setting does not affect revenues DWST monitors O&M of water facilities in terms of financial, technical andSupport administrative performance, including periodic audits, and provides support where needed WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …16
  • RESPONSE BY DA TO MONITORING INFORMATION FEEDBACKAdoption of functionality andsustainability indicators for routinemonitoringBaseline data discussed at Executivecommittee meetingsThe East Gonja District Assemblyusing own resources have rehabilitated3 water systems (boreholes) inJankpariba, Chachosi, and Mariche at atotal cost of about GHc 1,200Data used to guide investmentplanningWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …17
  • RESPONSE BY DA TO BASELINE FINDINGS Developed comprehensive action plan on water service delivery spanning 2012-2013 focusing on: Support to DWST to routinely update functionality and sustainability data and carry out service authority function Refresher training of WATSAN Committees and WSDBs Identification and training of area mechanics Explore options of treating surface water for drinking in communities with low water tables Water quality testing and analysis Citizens government engagement around key issues of water delivery Strengthening spare parts supply chain and report systemWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …18
  • CONCLUDING… Financing is at the core of sustainable water services. To achieve sustainable water services which Triple-S is about, financing ought to be considered very importantly.WATER SERVICES THAT LAST …19
  • For more information visit : www.waterservicesthatlast.orgWATER SERVICES THAT LAST …20