S ustainable Services at Scale  - Triple-S Department for International Development  10 February 2011
Background to Triple-S <ul><ul><li>Six-year research project 2009 – 2014 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Managed by IRC in coll...
What do we mean by a service delivery approach?
Making a water service work  <ul><li>Clear sector policies </li></ul><ul><li>Well defined institutional roles  and respons...
How does Triple-S work?  <ul><ul><li>Outcomes based management – three ‘work streams’: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Coun...
Multi-country study into rural water <ul><ul><li>Inception phase activity - baseline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To landsca...
Thirteen study countries Range of development levels, aid dependency, business markets and reforms
Summary findings <ul><li>Continuum of approaches to rural water supply from implementation to service delivery at scale, l...
Sustainability continuum Implementation approach with limited ability to scale up.  Time and spatial dimensions are limite...
Three broad sector groupings
Building blocks towards an SDA <ul><li>Professionalisation of community management </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative service p...
Significant gaps and weaknesses <ul><li>Planning for asset management of rural water infrastructure  </li></ul><ul><li>Ful...
Policy implications – group #1 <ul><li>Strengthen approaches to  </li></ul><ul><li>CBM – legalisation and  </li></ul><ul><...
Policy implications – group #2 <ul><li>Sector capacity building including support to professionalising CBM </li></ul><ul><...
Policy implications – group #3 <ul><li>Asset management planning </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity support to local government </...
Outputs and products <ul><li>Country reports </li></ul><ul><li>Literature reviews  </li></ul><ul><li>Global synthesis repo...
Future direction and emerging opportunities <ul><ul><li>High interest based on research and scoping: India, Mozambique, Et...
More information Triple-S:  www.irc.nl/page/45530   [email_address]   [email_address] [email_address]   WASHCost:  www.was...
Service delivery models  RURAL (VILLAGE)  RURAL - HIGHLY DISPERSED  RURAL GROWTH CENTRES AND SMALL TOWNS VOLUNTARY BASED S...
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Sustainable Services at Scale - Triple-S

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Sustainable Services at Scale - Triple-S

  1. 1. S ustainable Services at Scale - Triple-S Department for International Development 10 February 2011
  2. 2. Background to Triple-S <ul><ul><li>Six-year research project 2009 – 2014 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Managed by IRC in collaboration with partners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Funded by BMGF as part of their WASH learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contributing to shift in paradigm from infrastructure focus to service delivery approaches for rural water sector through: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Action research in Ghana, Uganda (BF) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Global research and documentation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Partnerships and advocacy </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. What do we mean by a service delivery approach?
  4. 4. Making a water service work <ul><li>Clear sector policies </li></ul><ul><li>Well defined institutional roles and responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Strong planning and coordination, leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Harmonised approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Learning and innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Strong community participation </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate technology </li></ul><ul><li>Relevant management models </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term support, monitoring and oversight </li></ul><ul><li>Norms and good practice </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding and meeting life-cycle costs </li></ul>
  5. 5. How does Triple-S work? <ul><ul><li>Outcomes based management – three ‘work streams’: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Country workstreams – Ghana and Uganda </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>International workstream </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Values – relevance, responsiveness, leverage and legacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Principles framework to guide content – including LCCA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Big investment in learning – both content/impact and process (Sensemaker @ ) </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Multi-country study into rural water <ul><ul><li>Inception phase activity - baseline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To landscape rural water sector in range of countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To identify factors and trends that promote – or constrain – service delivery at scale </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To identify organisational incentives and barriers for sector institutions </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Thirteen study countries Range of development levels, aid dependency, business markets and reforms
  8. 8. Summary findings <ul><li>Continuum of approaches to rural water supply from implementation to service delivery at scale, largely related to overall country context </li></ul><ul><li>Least developed countries are in “hydraulic mission” stage of infrastructure development </li></ul><ul><li>Some of them in same stage but in scaled up manner </li></ul><ul><li>Service delivery becomes more of a concern only when certain coverage has been reached (around 70%) – though many of these do not do so in a scaled up manner </li></ul>
  9. 9. Sustainability continuum Implementation approach with limited ability to scale up. Time and spatial dimensions are limited Scaled up implementation approach. Can be taken to scale, but does not address long-term systemic change or sustainability Service delivery approach with limited ability to scale up. Supports indefinite services through improving sector systems, but done in a piecemeal way Full Service Delivery Approach. Addresses sustainable services at scale through support to entire sector ‘system’ in a coordinated and comprehensive way
  10. 10. Three broad sector groupings
  11. 11. Building blocks towards an SDA <ul><li>Professionalisation of community management </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative service provider options (small private operators, self-supply) </li></ul><ul><li>Clarifying ‘rules of the game’ – institutional and policy </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability indicators and targets </li></ul><ul><li>Post-construction support to service providers </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity support to decentralised government (service authorities) </li></ul><ul><li>Strong learning and sharing of experience </li></ul><ul><li>Bringing along ‘political’ leaders and champions </li></ul>
  12. 12. Significant gaps and weaknesses <ul><li>Planning for asset management of rural water infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Full understanding of costs and adequate planning for all life-cycle expenditures (particularly capital maintenance and direct and indirect costs) </li></ul><ul><li>Regulation of rural water services and service providers </li></ul>
  13. 13. Policy implications – group #1 <ul><li>Strengthen approaches to </li></ul><ul><li>CBM – legalisation and </li></ul><ul><li>formalisation with local government </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasise and invest in post-construction support </li></ul><ul><li>Alignment of DP programmatic support, particularly around implementation approaches to avoid fragmentation and conflicting policies for communities </li></ul><ul><li>Improve monitoring systems to focus on services </li></ul>
  14. 14. Policy implications – group #2 <ul><li>Sector capacity building including support to professionalising CBM </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify legal and institutional frameworks for asset management and delegated contracting (PPP) </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity support to decentralised government sector staff </li></ul><ul><li>Improving financial disbursement mechanisms/pooled funding </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring sustainability of services </li></ul><ul><li>DPs – longer horizon and more reliable funding streams </li></ul><ul><li>Governments – commitment to operationalising reforms </li></ul>
  15. 15. Policy implications – group #3 <ul><li>Asset management planning </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity support to local government </li></ul><ul><li>Financial mechanisms to meet capital maintenance costs (rotating funds) </li></ul><ul><li>Improving life-cycle cost analysis and more investment in direct and indirect costs </li></ul><ul><li>Regulation – monitoring of </li></ul><ul><li>services and service providers </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies to reach the last 10-15% of un-served </li></ul>
  16. 16. Outputs and products <ul><li>Country reports </li></ul><ul><li>Literature reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Global synthesis report </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spin-off briefing notes, articles and country summary sheets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Film ‘ Back to the River ’ </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Future direction and emerging opportunities <ul><ul><li>High interest based on research and scoping: India, Mozambique, Ethiopia, Honduras, Nepal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Triple-S country funded by USAID – Burkina Faso – 2011 to 2014 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>International initiatives and partnerships – RWSN, JMP review, SWA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>USA sector – USAID, foundations, NGOs and ‘patient capital’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combining efforts with WASHCost for international embedding and advocacy – training package </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. More information Triple-S: www.irc.nl/page/45530 [email_address] [email_address] [email_address] WASHCost: www.washcost.info [email_address]
  19. 19. Service delivery models RURAL (VILLAGE) RURAL - HIGHLY DISPERSED RURAL GROWTH CENTRES AND SMALL TOWNS VOLUNTARY BASED SEMI-PROFESSIONALISED FULLY PROFESSIONALISED Delegated contracts to private operators Community-based management Direct local government or municipal provider Urban utility (public, private or mixed) Self Supply
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