Session Harmonization 3c - Minta kampala seminar 2010
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Session Harmonization 3c - Minta kampala seminar 2010

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    Session Harmonization 3c - Minta kampala seminar 2010 Session Harmonization 3c - Minta kampala seminar 2010 Presentation Transcript

    • INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RURAL WATER SERVICES SPEKE RESORT HOTEL MUNYONGO KAMPALA UGANDA 13 TH -15 TH APRIL, 2010
      • ADDRESSING SUSTAINABILITY
      • OF RURAL WATER SUPPLY WITHIN THE MOVE TOWARDS A SWAP
      • THE GHANA EXPERIENCE
      • Minta A. Aboagye
      • Director (Water)
      • Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing
    • INTRODUCTION
      • Key Development Issues :
      • About 40% of population ( 23 million , 2008) have no access to safe water
      • 66% have no access to adequate sanitation
      • MDG target: 76% by 2015
      • GPRS II target: 85% by 2015
      • Both require substantial investments to achieve
    • Sector Reforms and Progress
      • Prior to 1994 W&S (gray water) services sole responsibility of one agency, Ghana Water and Sewerage Corporation (GWSC)
      • Service to rural communities suffered as GWSC gave more attention to urban than to rural
      • Government Introduced the National Community Water and Sanitation Programme (NCWSP) 1994 to correct imbalance
      • Decoupled Rural Water Supply from Urban Water supply (1994)
      • Established Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) in 1998 for rural water and water related sanitation
      • GWSC converted to limited liability co. Ghana Water Co Ltd
    • Sector Reforms and Progress (cnt’d)
      • Also established Water Resources Commission (WRC) for water resources management (Act 522, 1996)
      • Separation of rural fro urban water supply engendered increase donor support to the rural water sector
      • Resulted in multiplicity of projects with varied project implementation strategies including monitoring and evaluation
      • CWSA had to attend to all DP projects and missions with attendant increase in transaction cost!
    • Sector Reforms and Progress (cnt’d)
      • Water Directorate established in the Ministry in 2004 as focal point for sector coordination, harmonization, sector-wide monitoring and evaluation of GPRS outcomes and MDG targets, as well as coordination of foreign assistance
      • Water and Sanitation Sector Group (WSSG) established to provide platform for coordinating and harmonizing DP programmes. (later on membership widened to include other sector players including NGOs and philanthropic organisations)
      • Notable achievement was formulation of the National Water Policy (NWP) led by WD and received Cabinet approval policy in 2007 providing sector with clear policy direction in water resources management and water supply (rural and urban)
    • Sector Reforms and Progress (cnt’d)
      • Catalysed development of Strategic Investment Plans (SIPs) for both rural and urban. Provide a sector-wide investment view for better targeting of resources.
      • Effective collaboration with NGOs through CONIWAS, umbrella body for NGOs in Water and Sanitation.
      • Provided a platform for testing DP collaboration on funds disbursement (DANIDA, DFID, Netherlands) for water and sanitation projects.
    • Challenges Persist
      • Though significant growth and development has been achieved, sector still hampered by lack of clear over-arching vision of strategy and coordination framework covering the different parts of the sector
      • Added to this is difficulty in harmonising and alignment of donor support to government programmes and procedures
      • Led to poor prioritisation and planning of investments; increased transaction costs; limited ability of sector to absorb increased funding and thereby militating against achieving desired outcomes.
    • Overcoming the challenge
      • Though sector had made prior attempt at SWAp, not much was achieved
      • Call for a national sector strategy to be developed backed by SWAp
      • Intention is to adopt more holistic, coordinated, harmonised, and results-oriented approach to improve programme implementation delivery and maximise use of funds
      • Reduce costs associated with implementing sector programmes by developing Sector Strategic Development Plan covering all three sub-sectors, i.e.
      • Water Resources Management
      • Urban Water Supply
      • Rural Water Supply and related sanitation
    • The SWAp Roadmap
      • The SWAp Roadmap essentially serves as a work plan for a
      • SWAp by 2011
      • To successfully achieve this milestone , the ff were agreed:
      • Prepare and sign Code of Conduct between GoG and DPs
      • Prepare and sign Memorandum of Understanding with sector DPs
      • Areas to obtain consensus
      • Sector Assessments
      • Funding Mechanisms
      • Common sector M&E System
      • Sector Operational Guidelines, and
      • Development of Comprehensive Sector Strategic Dev. Plan
    • Sector Assessment
      • What does it entail?
      • Identification of existing assessments
        • Develop relevant TORs assessments (including Risks, Capacity, Gender, Environmental, Civil Society, Private Sector Participation, Sector Coordination, etc)
        • Engage Consultants for all Assessments
        • Consolidate all Reports
        • Workshop on Assessments to seek stakeholders agreement on strategies and way forward
        • Monitor implementation of agreed strategies
    • Funding Mechanisms
      • Activities
      • Review existing sector funding mechanisms
      • Develop sector funding mechanisms including funds flow utilisation and reporting
      • Seek agreement of GoG and DPs on sector funding mechanisms
    • Common M & E Systems
      • Agreement on sector definitions, indicators, and terminologies
      • Develop sector Monitoring and Evaluation Plan
      • Complete DiMES design, testing and installation
      • Expand Dimes to capture Urban sub-sector
      • Complete DiMES roll-out to all districts and train Officers
      • Link DiMES to NDPC (Nat. Dev. Planning Comm.) System
      • Develop and institute Joint M & E Framework
    • Sector Operational Guidelines
      • Review and develop harmonised sector operational
      • Guidelines. Entails review of all NCWSP manuals:
      • Project Implementation Manual (PIM)
      • District Level Implementation Manual (DIM)
      • Community Level Operational Manual (COM)
      • Gender Mainstreaming Manual
      • Environmental Mainstreaming Guidelines
      • Private Sector Participation Guidelines
      • Water Quality Monitoring Framework
      • Post Construction Support Manual, etc
    • Action Oriented Workshops
        • To move the process forward to achieve set objectives within the timeframe set, 8 action-oriented workshops have been lined up.
        • Two have been conducted the immediate past was devoted to the SWAp process in general and, in particular, the preparation and study of the Code of Conduct for comments from DPs
        • The next W/S will focus on the Sector Strategic Development Plan to be held in May, 2010
    • Challenges
      • Process is fraught with challenges, s.a.:
      • Realistic Timeframe?
      • Can we count on ALL DPs? (Bi and Multilateral)
      • Can the process seriously influence funding mechanisms in the light of increasing move towards basket funding
      • Government Commitment to funding the process
    • Way Forward: Keep Hope Alive
      • Indications are there is a good measure of goodwill from some DPs including some International NGOs to the process
      • Development of the SSDP will provide an important framework for funds mobilisation for sector programmes
      • Will provide clear direction of sector development in the long term
      • Will create positive impact on long-term sustainability of services in the sector
    • More importantly
      • Here to learn from the experiences of countries such as Uganda, Mozambique, Malawi, etc, who have led the way to help us avoid potential PITFALLS!
      • AND
      • TO KEEP HOPE ALIVE!
      • THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION