Remote Monitoring of Rural Water Supplies Using Grundfos LIFELINK

  • 281 views
Uploaded on

By Andrew Armstrong, Community Development Programs Manager, Water Missions International. Prepared for the Monitoring sustainable WASH service delivery symposium, 9-11 April 2013, Addis Ababa, …

By Andrew Armstrong, Community Development Programs Manager, Water Missions International. Prepared for the Monitoring sustainable WASH service delivery symposium, 9-11 April 2013, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
281
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5

Actions

Shares
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Left: Kimmi Island landing siteRight: Matanda site
  • Christian engineering organizationHeadquarters in Charleston, SC, USAOffices in nine countries (150 full time indigenous engineers, community dev practitioners, technicians, etc.)Supporting community-level safe water schemes and sanitation projects in latin america, eastern africa and southeast asiaSince incorporation, supported ~800 community water supply projects (initiate ~150 new projects/year)
  • (1 min)Objective: illustrate how we are using an automated technology developed and manufactured by Grundfos in our programsGrundfos developed technology to track finances of community-managed point source water supplies > this is helping us to bring about a level of accountability in our projectsHowever, I also want to show that LL is a powerful tool for collecting household-level water use data (specifically penetration and consumption) > we are utilizing this data to facilitate learning and adaptationUltimate end of providing better and lasting services
  • Things that I don’t have time to cover during presentation but that are important to understand the scope of how we are using LIFELINK technology in the fieldPiloting LL within pilot of a new management modelWMI country program office operates as water service provider in communities under a sustainable nonprofit business model (direct to paper for more information, questions after session)
  • Automated water distribution pointIntegrated with a secure payment facility and real-time GSM monitoring system
  • Water users purchase a water key for ~$?ea (samples passing around) and transfer credit onto it from our local employee’s “credit key”When users insert key into LL unit, dispense water and credit is deducted from the keyLL automatically logs each financial and water distribution transaction
  • Data logged for each transaction: amount of credit transferred ending balance volume of water transferred date/time stampTransmitted to Grundfos’ proprietary online database (GRM)WMI internal database communicates on daily basis to retrieve and analyze this data
  • (5 min)Screenshots of our database and some of the plots that are updated dailyFinancial analysis – daily totals of water user keys sold value and number of times credit added to keysDispensation analysis – daily totals of value of water dispensed volume of water dispensed number of tapping sessions/independent customers
  • Most interestingly, individual water key analysis – running total of value, volume of water purchased, # tapping sessions daily averages
  • First and longest-running TradeWater pilot project Transient fishing settlement (~380 HH, 2000 people) Lake water source Solar pump, filtration, chlorination Storage tank with gravity-fed distribution to a LL unit located in the middle of the village in TradeWater business center Sell safe water, offer public bathing facilities and solar mobile phone charging in order to generate additional revenue for project Research project – capital cost ~$95k
  • First and longest-running TradeWater pilot project Transient fishing settlement (~380 HH, 2000 people) Lake water source Solar pump, filtration, chlorination Storage tank with gravity-fed distribution to a LL unit located in the middle of the village in TradeWater business center Sell safe water, offer public bathing facilities and solar mobile phone charging in order to generate additional revenue for project Research project – capital cost ~$95k
  • Income from water sales (remained fairly constant over study period – point to distribution plot)Total income accounts for additional revenue sources (~$1.30/person/year)
  • OpEx = staff commissions and salaries, administrative, chemical and transportation costs (fluctuated over time, ~$1.25/person/year)CapManEx = major maintenance, repair and depreciation (high for this pilot project because of abnormally high capital costs, very much a research project)OpEx plus CapManEx ~$3.15/person/yearProject operating under financial deficit > LIFELINK data helps us to better understand how we can increase revenue
  • In order to increase revenue, we look at individual water use data to see what conclusions we can drawConsidered each water key to be a userOriginally assumed 1 water key = 1 householdNoticed many keys collecting >100L/day > split users into two groups (ind users, sharers/institutions/vendors)
  • As # individual users decreased, # of sharers/resellers increasedThere are a number of reasons why we are seeing this trend. combining credit onto a single key for a cluster of households seen as a convenience purchasing vended water seen as a convenience (will talk about later)
  • However, encouraging to see that avg. # daily tapping sessions & volume increased over time “low consuming” users not being retained, remaining users increasingly satisfied with serviceIncrease resulted in constant water distribution (and income)
  • (10 min)The best way to visualize these trends is by looking at household penetration and consumption.Decrease in % of houses using water from the system, but increase in volume collected by each individual user.These estimates for penetration account for individual water users as well as the estimated number of homes using water collected with shared/vended water keys.Why do we care about this? Revenue is a function of penetration, consumption and water priceRoom to increase market share (~20% as of November 2012). If consumption maintained but market share returned to highest level seen to date (40% in March), we could increase revenue by 100% and achieve full cost recovery. Indicates that we need to look at implementing promotional activities (creative pricing structures) and marketing campaigns (promotional messaging targeted to increase demand) in order to try and increase in penetration and consumptionAlthough these analyses were done specifically for this study, we can easily program our database to generate these types of figures automatically using LL data. Such analyses are likely to play a major role in the business model that we are developing with pilot data.
  • We designed this system with capacity to serve entire community – no limits to number of houses collecting waterHowever, there is a boundary that we need to consider as we attempt to increase consumption and look at potentially increasing water priceLow consumption expenditure indicates: Financial access is not limited Room to increase consumption and/or water price- water price in Kikondo is 2-10x less than market price – 50UGX/20L ($0.02)Increasing consumption increases consumption expenditure
  • (12 min)Assigned each residence in Kikondo to a zone representing radial distance from LL unit in increments of 50mVisited residences of individuals who were actively using water keys and took GPS coordinates.Visualize the impact that distance travelled to water point has on average daily volume collected per user (each green dot represents water user in Kikondo)Can also visualize how distance affects household penetration in each radial distance zone<50m showed high penetrationSame trend in consumption (anomoly at 200-250 radial distance zone)Distance travelled to the water point impacts household penetration and consumption.In order to address this, we would look to add additional water points or engage with vendors to resell safe water in zones where penetration is low. Have since engaged with local vendors who are reselling TradeWater water in outskirts of villageLL units at additional water points currently cost ~$14k ea – Grundfos is working to decrease cost to ~$4/5k. For us, this sort of analysis across many projects helps us to better design distribution networks in our community-managed (non-TradeWater) projects
  • (14 min)

Transcript

  • 1. Remote Monitoring of Rural Water Supplies Using Grundfos LIFELINKAndrew ArmstrongCommunity Development Programs ManagerMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 2. Nine country programmes 150 full-time indigenous staff Charleston, SC, USAMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 3. Objectives Use LIFELINK automated technology to: • Track community-level finances Accountability • Analyze household-level water use data Learning ‒ Household penetration ‒ Consumption Provide lasting servicesMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 4. Context • TradeWaterTM programme – Privatized water service delivery – Nonprofit business model – Staff/responsibilities at community and country programme office levels – Nine current pilot projects (45 planned) • LIFELINK money handling and cash flowMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 5. LIFELINK Water UnitMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 6. LIFELINK Water UnitMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 7. Data Transmission Grundfos’ Revenue Water Missions Management System International’s Reporting (GRM) DatabaseMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 8. Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 9. Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 10. LEGENDCase Study: Pump House LIFELINK UnitTradeWater Kikondo Pump/Treat House Reservoir Tank Treatment House Underground Vault Business Centre Lake Intake Supply Piping Distribution Piping Power/Control CablesMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 11. LEGENDCase Study: Pump House LIFELINK UnitTradeWater Kikondo Pump/Treat House Reservoir Tank Treatment House Underground Vault Business Centre Lake Intake Supply Piping Distribution Piping Power/Control CablesMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 12. Financial Analysis • Total Income = Revenue from water sales, mobile phone charging and bathing shelter • Operating Expenses (OpEx) = staff commissions and salaries, administrative, chemical and transportation costs • Total Expenses (OpEx and CapManEx) = operating expenses, major maintenance, repair and equipment depreciationMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 13. Financial Analysis • Total Income = Revenue from water sales, mobile phone charging and bathing shelter • Operating Expenses (OpEx) = staff commissions and salaries, administrative, chemical and transportation costs • Total Expenses (OpEx and CapManEx) = operating expenses plus major maintenance, repair and equipment depreciationMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 14. Individual Water Use Data Individual Users Institutional Users/Vendors (≤100L avg. daily volume collected) (>100L avg. daily volume collected)Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 15. Individual Water Use Data Individual Users Institutional Users/Vendors (≤100L avg. daily volume collected) (>100L avg. daily volume collected)Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 16. Individual Water Use Data Individual Users Institutional Users/Vendors (≤100L avg. daily volume collected) (>100L avg. daily volume collected)Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 17. Individual Water Use Data • Revenue is a function of household penetration, consumption, and water price • Creative pricing structures and targeted marketing campaigns could lead to increased penetration and consumptionMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 18. Water Price Considerations • Consumption expenditure – 3% threshold suggested by UNDP2 – 1.2% avg. in Kikondo • Supply vs. Demand2United Nations Development Programme [UNDP], 2006. Human Development Report; Beyond scarcity: Power, poverty and the global watercrisis. New York, NY, USA.Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 19. Spatial AnalysisMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 20. Conclusions • In addition to financial accountability, LIFELINK automated technology enables: – Simplified and streamlined ongoing analysis of household- level water use data (household penetration and consumption) – Identification of “critical need” areas and targeting of infrastructure/staff time – Temporal and spatial evaluation of revenue-increasing strategies • LIFELINK is a viable off-the-shelf option for automatically tracking community-level finances and capturing water use dataMonitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 21. Thank you for your time. Questions?Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org
  • 22. Monitoring Sustainable WASH Service Delivery Symposium, Addis AbabaWednesday 10 April 2013aarmstrong@watermissions.org