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Supplementary Slides for             Software Engineering:         A Practitioners Approach, 5/                        e  ...
Chapter 3                                  Project                                ManagementThese courseware materials are...
The 4 P’st People — the most important element of a  successful projectt Product — the software to be builtt Process — the...
Software                        Projects     Factors that influence the end result ...                               • siz...
Project Management                       ConcernsThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software En...
Why Projects                                    Fail? • an unrealistic deadline is established  • changing customer requir...
Software                           TeamsThe following factors must be considered when selecting asoftware project team str...
Organizational                               Paradigmst closed paradigm—structures a team along a traditional  hierarchy o...
Defining the Problem       t establish scope—a narrative that bounds         the problem       t decomposition—establishes...
.                  Melding Problem and                        Process              COMMON PROCESS              customer   ...
To Get to the Essence of a                    Project    t Why is the system being developed?    t What will be done? By w...
Critical                                        Practices         t Formal risk analysis         t Empirical cost and sche...
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Chapter03

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Transcript of "Chapter03"

  1. 1. Supplementary Slides for Software Engineering: A Practitioners Approach, 5/ e copyright © 1996, 2001 R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc. For University Use Only May be reproduced ONLY for student use at the university levelwhen used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioners Approach. Any other reproduction or use is expressly prohibited. This presentation, slides, or hardcopy may NOT be used for short courses, industry seminars, or consulting purposes. These courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach, 5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 1
  2. 2. Chapter 3 Project ManagementThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 2
  3. 3. The 4 P’st People — the most important element of a successful projectt Product — the software to be builtt Process — the set of framework activities and software engineering tasks to get the job donet Project — all work required to make the product a realityThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 3
  4. 4. Software Projects Factors that influence the end result ... • size • delivery deadline • budgets and costs • application domain • technology to be implemented • system constraints • user requirements • available resourcesThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 4
  5. 5. Project Management ConcernsThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 5
  6. 6. Why Projects Fail? • an unrealistic deadline is established • changing customer requirements • an honest underestimate of effort • predictable and/or unpredictable risks • technical difficulties • miscommunication among project staff • failure in project managementThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 6
  7. 7. Software TeamsThe following factors must be considered when selecting asoftware project team structure ... t the difficulty of the problem to be solved t the size of the resultant program(s) in lines of code or function points t the time that the team will stay together (team lifetime) t the degree to which the problem can be modularized t the required quality and reliability of the system to be built t the rigidity of the delivery date t the degree of sociability (communication) required for the project These courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach, 5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 7
  8. 8. Organizational Paradigmst closed paradigm—structures a team along a traditional hierarchy of authority (similar to a CC team)t random paradigm—structures a team loosely and depends on individual initiative of the team memberst open paradigm—attempts to structure a team in a manner that achieves some of the controls associated with the closed paradigm but also much of the innovation that occurs when using the random paradigmt synchronous paradigm—relies on the natural compartment- alization of a problem and organizes team members to work on pieces of the problem with little active communication among themselves suggested by Constantine [CON93]These courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 8
  9. 9. Defining the Problem t establish scope—a narrative that bounds the problem t decomposition—establishes functional partitioningThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 9
  10. 10. . Melding Problem and Process COMMON PROCESS customer risk FRAMEWORK ACTIVITIES planning analysis communication engineering Software Engineering Tasks Product Functions Text input Editing and formating Automatic copy edit Page layout capability Automatic indexing and TOC File management Document productionThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 10
  11. 11. To Get to the Essence of a Project t Why is the system being developed? t What will be done? By when? t Who is responsible for a function? t Where are they organizationally located? t How will the job be done technically and managerially? t How much of each resource (e.g., people, software, tools, database) will be needed? Barry BoehmThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 11
  12. 12. Critical Practices t Formal risk analysis t Empirical cost and schedule estimation t Metrics-based project management t Earned value tracking t Defect tracking against quality targets t People aware project managementThese courseware materials are to be used in conjunction with Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach,5/e and are provided with permission by R.S. Pressman & Associates, Inc., copyright © 1996, 2001 12
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