Alaska Feb 2010 Sustainable Landscape Design

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Alaska Feb 2010 Sustainable Landscape Design

  1. 1. Sustainable Landscape Design<br />PlantWise, WaterWise, FireWise<br />John Peter Thompson<br />Alaska, January 2010<br />
  2. 2. John Peter Thompson<br />Immediate past Vice Chair National Invasive Species Council Advisory Committee<br />Member, Maryland Invasive Species Council<br />Past President and founding director, Mid Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council<br />Past President, Maryland Nursery & Landscape Association<br />Technical Advisor, Sustainable Site Initiative Vegetative Subcommittee (LEEDS standards)<br />Member, Chesapeake Conservation Landscape Council<br />Invasive Species Consultant, ANLA<br />
  3. 3. Principles of Traditional Horticulture <br />Organize<br />Control<br />(De)limit<br />Create<br />
  4. 4. Versailles; It’s Good to be The King<br />Traditional Landscapes provide an informing function. There is a common grammar which allows a common understanding. The syntax includes form, color and texture and is based upon infinite resources to be exploited<br />
  5. 5. Traditional Landscape Model<br /> Food,<br />Medicine,<br />Genetic resources,<br />Raw materials<br />
  6. 6. Underlying Historic Ecosystem Services<br /> Aesthetic information, <br />Cultural and artistic , <br />Spiritual and historic ,<br /> Science and education ,<br /> Recreation <br />
  7. 7. Ecosystem interactionsin the traditional landscape model<br />
  8. 8. Resources taken for granted or assumed<br />The slowly varying aspects of the atmosphere–hydrosphere–landsurface system. It is typically characterized in terms of suitable averages of the climate system over periods of a month or more, taking into consideration the variability in time of these averaged quantities <br />From: Glossary of Meteorology<br />
  9. 9. Charts to ponder<br />Temperature change <br />CO2 change<br />
  10. 10. Warning<br />Investment in Agricultural, including Horticultural,<br />Research. <br />
  11. 11. As temperature and carbon dioxide change, what are the implications for agriculture & horticulture?<br />Temperature<br />Temperature + CO2<br />Water<br />Agro & horto-ecosystems.<br />
  12. 12. Weed Control<br />Agroecosystems:<br />Ambient CO2<br />Future CO2<br />Increasing CO2 reduces herbicide efficacy.<br />e.g. Ziska et al. Weed Science 52:584-588, 2004<br />
  13. 13. Agroecosystems:<br />Greater selection for invasive species <br />Does rising carbon dioxide favor invasive weeds within the plant community?<br />Species Community Favored? Reference<br />Yellow star thistle California grassland Yes? Dukes, 2002<br />Honey mesquite Texas prairie Yes. Polley et al. 1994<br />Japanese honeysuckle Forest under-story Yes. Belote et al. 2003<br />Cherry laurel Forest under-story Yes. Hattenschwiler & Korner 2003<br />Red Brome Desert Yes. Smith et al. 2000<br />
  14. 14. A New Landscape Matrix<br />
  15. 15. Regulating services <br />CO2<br />• carbon sequestration and climate regulation <br />• waste decomposition and detoxification <br />• nutrient dispersal and cycling <br />Foods, Forests, Flowers, Fuels, Fibers<br />Nutrients, H2O<br />Any change in light, water, nutrients or carbon dioxide will alter plant growth.<br />
  16. 16. Regulating services <br />• purification of water and air <br />• crop pollination and seed dispersal <br />• pest and disease control <br />Photograph © Jay Cossey<br />http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/facts/biocontrol_aphidsf2.jpg<br />
  17. 17. Preserving services <br />• genetic and species diversity for future use <br />• accounting for uncertainty <br />• protection of options <br />
  18. 18. Provisioning services <br />• foods (including seafood and game) and spices <br />• precursors to pharmaceutical and industrial products <br />• energy (hydropower, biomass fuels) <br />
  19. 19. Informing services <br />• cultural, intellectual and spiritual inspiration <br />• recreational experiences (including ecotourism) <br />• scientific discovery <br />
  20. 20. SoilWise<br />Preserve and protect healthy soils <br />Improve health of degraded soils <br />Reduce waste during maintenance <br />
  21. 21. WaterWise<br />Balance your water budget<br />Incorporate water infiltration into the site design<br />Reuse water<br />Clean and slow the flow of water to protect and enhance down stream water bodies. <br />
  22. 22. ResourceWise<br />Manage resources and materials efficiently. <br />Select materials for durability. <br />Use local materials. <br /> the urban heat island effect. <br />
  23. 23. PlantWise<br />Protect and conserve existing vegetation. <br />Eliminate the use of invasive plants. <br />Specify plants from local growers<br />Minimize the amount of time that plants are stored on-site before planting. <br />
  24. 24. PeopleWise<br />Provide spaces for physical activities.  <br />Support on-site food production.  <br />Provide spaces for social interaction.  <br />
  25. 25. FireWise<br />Local area fire history.<br />Site location and overall terrain.<br /> Prevailing winds and seasonal weather.<br />Property contours and boundaries.<br />Native vegetation.<br />Plant characteristics and placement (duffage, water and salt retention ability, aromatic oils, fuel<br />load per area, and size).<br />Irrigation requirements.<br />
  26. 26. A New Landscape Matrix<br />Regulating services <br />• carbon sequestration and climate regulation <br />• waste decomposition and detoxification <br />• nutrient dispersal and cycling <br />• purification of water and air <br />• crop pollination and seed dispersal <br />• pest and disease control <br />Preserving services <br />• genetic and species diversity for future use <br />• accounting for uncertainty <br />• protection of options <br />Provisioning services <br />• foods (including seafood and game) and spices <br />• precursors to pharmaceutical and industrial products <br />• energy (hydropower, biomass fuels) <br />Cultural services <br />• cultural, intellectual and spiritual inspiration <br />• recreational experiences (including ecotourism) <br />• scientific discovery <br />
  27. 27. THANK YOU<br />

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