SWPBS: AMULTI-TIEREDPREVENTIONFRAMEWORK
ORGANIZER: WHY INVEST IN MULTI-TIERPREVENTION Recognizing Tier I when you see it Sustained systems-change Capacity buil...
WHEREITSTARTS
WHERE IT OFTEN ENDS  C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
COMMON APPROACHES TO ACADEMIC AND SOCIALBEHAVIOR CONCERNS  Piecemeal approach  Reactionary strategies and “wait to fail”...
“TRAIN & HOPE”          WAIT for                 REACT to          New                      Problem          Problem      ...
HOW DO WE IMPROVE                 SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS?C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
WE KNOW WHAT WORKS… Prevention   and early intervention Interventions derived from behavior  analysis    Explicit instr...
C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
IMPLEMENTATION IS A CHALLENGE Limited    resources   Expertise   Time   Money Multiple   competing initiatives and “i...
IMPLEMENTATION OF ANY INTERVENTION                         CHEAP            FAST                                   GOOD  C...
C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
INTERVENTIONS ALONE ARE NOT ENOUGH          Systems   Outcomes
SWPB IS3-5 expectations andrewards  An intervention     One size fits all        A new idea
SWPB ISA framework to enhance adoption& sustained implementation of   A continuum of evidence-based   interventions to ach...
TIER I: Core, Universal • Intervention is for ALL        Tier I begins w/clear goals   students                       1. W...
WHY FOCUS ON THE WHOLE SCHOOL?   What we need is stiffer consequences!
COMMON RESPONSE: GET TOUGH!Re-re-re-re   review rulesCounseling“aversive” consequences
100                                        90Mean Perentage of Students with ODRs                                        8...
6 or more                                                                                           2-5                   ...
KEY PRACTICES AT TIER I1.   Consistent approach to school discipline2.   Clear set of positively worded     expectations &...
KEY PRACTICES AT TIER I1.   Consistent approach to school discipline2.   Clear set of positively worded            As PBIS...
TIER I SYSTEMS Team guides school-wide implementation Data used to guide decision-making prior to  implementation Goals...
TIER I: Core, Universal                           At least 80% of                            students are                 ...
MEETING THE NEEDS OF ALLSTUDENTS   Problem       Foundation in place: 10-20% of students will not be        successful ...
MEETING THE NEEDS OF ALLSTUDENTS   Problem       Foundation in place: 10-20% of students will not be        successful ...
TIER II: Supplemental, Targeted• For students who haven’t  responded to Tier I• Effective if at least 70-80% of  students ...
Does intervention…1. Match needs of child (target, intensity)2. Get implemented with fidelity3. Result in significant grow...
TIER II INTERVENTIONS Match needs of school Are implemented rapidly     Similar across students            Enhance    ...
KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee  teachers are implementing it & “at risk students  are gett...
KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee  teachers are implementing it & “at risk students  are gett...
KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee  teachers are implementing it & “at risk students  are gett...
KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee  teachers are implementing it & “at risk students  are gett...
TIER III: Individualized• For students who haven’t  responded to Tier I & II• Effective if at least 70-80% of  students ar...
 Settings: common areas, classrooms PBIS in classrooms is not:     One size fits all     Tickets/tokens for all     M...
 Settings: common areas, classrooms PBIS in classrooms is not:      One size fits all      Tickets/tokens for all    S...
PBIS IN CLASSROOMS: TIER I School-wide expectations Rules for specific routines Explicit instruction in desired behavio...
SUPPLEMENTAL SYSTEMS Contingency-focused Positive or negative? How do you know if it is working?
BUILDING CAPACITY IN CLASSROOMS Include at start IF you have teacher buy-in If Tier I is not in place with fidelity, add...
IMPLEMENTATION LOGIC1     • Build data system2     • Establish measurable outcomes3     • Collect, analyze, & prioritize d...
Overview of School Wide PBIS (West Virginia Workshop, 2011)
Overview of School Wide PBIS (West Virginia Workshop, 2011)
Overview of School Wide PBIS (West Virginia Workshop, 2011)
Overview of School Wide PBIS (West Virginia Workshop, 2011)
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Overview of School Wide PBIS (West Virginia Workshop, 2011)

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  • Goals for todayTeaming structure and agenda for Tier II and grade level teamsDecision rules for Tier II interventions and how to progress monitor individual students and the overall system
  • Tier I LOOKS different at different schoolsExample: school for children with sig behavior concerns, small versus large, elem versus highTier I is the level of support YOUR students need so that most can succeed (meet your goals)
  • Elem: 3,128Middle: 917High: 391K-8: 255
  • Middle: 17% responsible for 81%High 21% responsible for 83%K-8 14% responsible for 79%
  • You see more of what you pay attention to.The best way to promote desired behavior is to TEACH using effective teaching strategies
  • Big thing at Tier III: Interventions need to involve small steps. We wouldn’t expect a child who can’t read to write an essay would we?
  • If you want to enhance Tier I and make it sustainable—see what steps you already have in place and then go forward
  • Overview of School Wide PBIS (West Virginia Workshop, 2011)

    1. 1. SWPBS: AMULTI-TIEREDPREVENTIONFRAMEWORK
    2. 2. ORGANIZER: WHY INVEST IN MULTI-TIERPREVENTION Recognizing Tier I when you see it Sustained systems-change Capacity building
    3. 3. WHEREITSTARTS
    4. 4. WHERE IT OFTEN ENDS C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
    5. 5. COMMON APPROACHES TO ACADEMIC AND SOCIALBEHAVIOR CONCERNS  Piecemeal approach  Reactionary strategies and “wait to fail”  Reliance on one individual to “fix” kids  Train and hope  “Best guess” interventions
    6. 6. “TRAIN & HOPE” WAIT for REACT to New Problem Problem Behavior Expect, But Select & HOPE for ADD Implementation Practice Hire EXPERT to Train Practice
    7. 7. HOW DO WE IMPROVE SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS?C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
    8. 8. WE KNOW WHAT WORKS… Prevention and early intervention Interventions derived from behavior analysis  Explicit instruction  Opportunities to practice  Reinforcement of desired behavior  Minimized reinforcement for problem behavior  Immediate feedback  Plan for generalization and maintenance Progress monitoring & data-based decisions C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
    9. 9. C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
    10. 10. IMPLEMENTATION IS A CHALLENGE Limited resources  Expertise  Time  Money Multiple competing initiatives and “interests” Lot’s of research on what works, little on how to do it
    11. 11. IMPLEMENTATION OF ANY INTERVENTION CHEAP FAST GOOD C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
    12. 12. C Anderson U Oregon March 2010
    13. 13. INTERVENTIONS ALONE ARE NOT ENOUGH Systems Outcomes
    14. 14. SWPB IS3-5 expectations andrewards An intervention One size fits all A new idea
    15. 15. SWPB ISA framework to enhance adoption& sustained implementation of A continuum of evidence-based interventions to achieve Desired academic and behavioral outcomes for ALL students
    16. 16. TIER I: Core, Universal • Intervention is for ALL Tier I begins w/clear goals students 1. What do we expect students • Effective if at least 80% of to learn? students are meeting 2. How will we know if it is benchmarks learned? 3. How do we respond when students have not learned? 4. How do we respond when students learn early? 16 16
    17. 17. WHY FOCUS ON THE WHOLE SCHOOL? What we need is stiffer consequences!
    18. 18. COMMON RESPONSE: GET TOUGH!Re-re-re-re review rulesCounseling“aversive” consequences
    19. 19. 100 90Mean Perentage of Students with ODRs 80 70 60 6 or more 2-5 50 0-1 40 30 20 10 0 Elementary Middle High K-8
    20. 20. 6 or more 2-5 8% 100 0-1Mean Perentage of ODRs Generated by Students in 90 80 70 60 Group 50 40 30 20 10 0 Elementary Middle High K-8
    21. 21. KEY PRACTICES AT TIER I1. Consistent approach to school discipline2. Clear set of positively worded expectations & behaviors3. Procedures for teaching expected behavior4. Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behavior5. Continuum of procedures for discouraging inappropriate behavior
    22. 22. KEY PRACTICES AT TIER I1. Consistent approach to school discipline2. Clear set of positively worded As PBIS Team, your job expectationsto provide a solid is & behaviors3. Proceduresrationale for each for teaching expected behavior4. Continuumpractice & guide encouraging of procedures for expecteddecisions around what behavior5. Continuum of procedures your this looks like in for discouraging school. inappropriate behavior
    23. 23. TIER I SYSTEMS Team guides school-wide implementation Data used to guide decision-making prior to implementation Goals are defined in measurable terms and are measure Evidence-based interventions emphasized Supports are in place to support initial and sustained implementation Data used to monitor  Status of implementation  Outcomes Modifications are based on data
    24. 24. TIER I: Core, Universal At least 80% of students are successful…what about the rest? 25 25
    25. 25. MEETING THE NEEDS OF ALLSTUDENTS Problem  Foundation in place: 10-20% of students will not be successful Solution?  Individualized interventions for all?
    26. 26. MEETING THE NEEDS OF ALLSTUDENTS Problem  Foundation in place: 10-20% of students will not be successful Solution?  Individualized interventions for all?
    27. 27. TIER II: Supplemental, Targeted• For students who haven’t responded to Tier I• Effective if at least 70-80% of students are meeting set goals Tier II guiding questions Core 1. What is the current level of + Supplemental performance? 2. Where do we want to be & by when? 3. How much growth must be demonstrated by month/year to get there? 4. What resources are needed 28 to move at this rate? 28
    28. 28. Does intervention…1. Match needs of child (target, intensity)2. Get implemented with fidelity3. Result in significant growth for most students?
    29. 29. TIER II INTERVENTIONS Match needs of school Are implemented rapidly  Similar across students Enhance  Staff trained in intervention fidelity  Materials on hand Match problem  Intensity  Mechanism (skill, fluency, or contingency deficit Use data-based decision-making  Who will likely benefit?  Is the intervention working?  Next steps
    30. 30. KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee teachers are implementing it & “at risk students are getting it “At Risk” students need proactive behavior management Before implementing a Tier II support, ask yourself… Before adding a new Tier II intervention (e.g., CICO), ask yourself…
    31. 31. KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee teachers are implementing it & “at risk students are getting it “At Risk” students need proactive behavior management Before implementing a Tier II support, ask yourself… Before adding a new Tier II intervention (e.g., CICO), ask yourself…
    32. 32. KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee teachers are implementing it & “at risk students are getting it “At Risk” students need proactive behavior management Before implementing a Tier II support, ask yourself… Before adding a new Tier II intervention (e.g., CICO), ask yourself…
    33. 33. KEY SYSTEMS FEATURES Simply “having” Tier I doesn’t guarantee teachers are implementing it & “at risk students are getting it If Not, STOP “At Risk” students need proactive behavior management Before implementing a Tier II support, ask yourself… Before adding a new Tier II intervention (e.g., CICO), ask yourself…
    34. 34. TIER III: Individualized• For students who haven’t responded to Tier I & II• Effective if at least 70-80% of students are meeting set goals Tier III guiding questions Core 1. What is the current level of + performance? Supplemental + 2. Where do we want to be & Intensive Individual Instruction by when? 3. How much growth must be demonstrated by month/year to get there? 4. What resources are needed 38 to move at this rate? 38
    35. 35.  Settings: common areas, classrooms PBIS in classrooms is not:  One size fits all  Tickets/tokens for all  Mandated behavior management
    36. 36.  Settings: common areas, classrooms PBIS in classrooms is not:  One size fits all  Tickets/tokens for all SWPBS is multi-tiered system for use  Mandated behavior management in ALL settings with ALL students
    37. 37. PBIS IN CLASSROOMS: TIER I School-wide expectations Rules for specific routines Explicit instruction in desired behavior Agreement about office versus classroom managed behavior Incentives for desired behavior Routines-focused systems are SUPPLEMENT
    38. 38. SUPPLEMENTAL SYSTEMS Contingency-focused Positive or negative? How do you know if it is working?
    39. 39. BUILDING CAPACITY IN CLASSROOMS Include at start IF you have teacher buy-in If Tier I is not in place with fidelity, add classrooms LATER Determine whether school-wide tickets will be used in classrooms Develop plan for enhancing classroom capacity  What are the goals? (what, when)  How will goals be measured? (who, how, when)  How will instruction/training occur? (who, how, when)
    40. 40. IMPLEMENTATION LOGIC1 • Build data system2 • Establish measurable outcomes3 • Collect, analyze, & prioritize data4 • Select evidence-based practices5 • Ensure efficient, accurate, and durable implementation6 • Implement7 • Monitor implementation (progress monitoring)Fixsen,Blase, Duda, Naoom, & Van Dyke (2010).

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