Investing in the future of
Allamakee, Chickasaw, Clayton, Fayette, Howard & Winneshiek
Counties
Ann Mansfield
Co-Convener ...
NACCHO Webinar Goals
• Have an increased understanding of the importance of using a
collaborative approach based in relati...
Session Outline
I. Brief introduction to the Initiative
II. Assumptions that Define our Approach
III. Our Organizational L...
I. Introduction to the Initiative
II. Our Defining Assumptions
• Articulate a compelling purpose, shared core values, and a
clear picture of the future
• Ci...
• “Policy” includes practices & institutional policies, as well as
legislation at all levels.
• Using a systems approach w...
• We work in service of the whole, while maintaining our
organizational and individual identities.
• Partnerships are crit...
III. Our Organizational Learning/
Systems Thinking
Approach
Engaged community members & organizations
Assessing Current Reality
The Built Environment
 Walkable/Bikable Community Mapping (2008)
 Inventory of NE Iowa Built E...
The Food System
• Annual Reports of NE Iowa Food & Farm Coalition; 2007,
2008, 2009
• Consumer household survey 2007
• Ins...
What can we make clearer for you
before we move to the next section?
IV. Plans & Preliminary Successes
Community Action Plan
Strategy A
• Ensure that school district policies & practices support healthy living of
children, fa...
Strategy A: Ensure that school district policies & practices
support healthy living of children, families and community
me...
Strategy A: Ensure that school district policies & practices support healthy living of
children, families and community me...
Strategy A: : Ensure that school district policies & practices support healthy living of
children, families and community ...
Strategy A Early Successes
Strategy B: Ensure that local, health-promoting food is available
and affordable in all communities, neighborhoods and
ins...
Strategy B: Ensure that local, health-promoting food is available and affordable in
all communities, neighborhoods and ins...
Strategy B: Ensure that local, health-promoting food is available and affordable in
all communities, neighborhoods and ins...
Strategy B Early Successes
• NE Iowa Food and Farm Coalition Annual Report – 2010; Local
food sales have doubled in last y...
Strategy C: Ensure that communities have a built environment
that supports abundant opportunities for physical activity an...
Examples of Tactics:
• Support a regional active living learning community
• Encourage and support school districts to dev...
Strategy C: Ensure that communities have a built environment that supports abundant
opportunities for physical activity an...
What is the Change? Local
Questions
Potential Key Players
Local
State
Questions
Potential Key Players
State
Federal
Questi...
Strategy C Early Successes
• Six pilot schools – forming teams, reviewing mapping, etc.
• Mark Fenton visit and SRTS works...
Strategy C Early Successes
V. Resources to Support Applying Organizational
Learning/Systems Thinking in Rural Communities
Pegasus Communications: www...
Investing in the future of
Allamakee, Chickasaw, Clayton, Fayette, Howard & Winneshiek
Counties
www.iowafoodandfitness.org
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
Naccho ppt ffi   final oct 28,2010
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  • Slide 9
    Hello everyone! My name is Ann Mansfield and I am one of Co-Conveners for the NE Iowa Food and Fitness Initiative. As you may know, our initiative is one of 9 Food & Fitness collaboratives funded by the W.K.Kellogg Foundation – to create healthier communities where children and their families have access to local healthy food and safe places to be physically active and play. The NE Iowa FFI is the only rural model.
    Thank you for giving me the opportunity to share with you the work that has been happening with the NE Iowa Food and Fitness Initiative. Joining me to day is Kathy Zurcher, our organizational learning and systems thinking consultant who has been working with us since before she retired from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, where she was the Director of Program and Organizational Learning.
  • Good afternoon, everyone. Today I am here to serve as a resource to all of you, just as I have been to the Northeast Iowa Food and Fitness initiative. As a result of the webinar today, we believe you will (read the slide)
  • (Briefly review the session outline)
  • I’d like to begin with a little background about our region and our work. The NE Iowa Food and Fitness Initiative encompasses six rural counties in the northeast corner of Iowa. This area has just under 100,000 people in small communities spread over a rural geographic area almost the size of Connecticut. These six counties are thinly populated, with 26 persons per square mile. We have one town with 8,000 people and only one other town has more than 5,000 people. The majority of our residents are dispersed across the landscapes on farms and acreages. Our region is made up of the working poor. Many are running farming operations in addition to their factory or ‘town’ jobs. Our communities are small and close-knit with schools serving as a primary connector or “hub” for many activities and functions.
    We have been working on Food and Fitness in NE Iowa for three years, including two years of initiating the work and the first year of implementation, which we are just completing. You will learn more about our initiative as this webinar progresses.
  • Kathy: Review the assumptions; Ann, add commentary as we go
  • Kathy: Next we will take a deeper dive into the organizational learning and systems thinking approach that NE Iowa Food and Fitness has been using.
  • Slide 11
    ANN: The focus of the WKKF Food & Fitness Initiative is a community-driven process focused on policy and system change to impact the food and fitness environments where we live, learn, work & play. Early in our planning, we were introduced by WKKF to organizational learning, systems thinking, and Daniel H. Kim’s Organizing for Learning framework and tools. This framework and Technical Assistance provided by WKKF -- has guided us to approach this grass-roots planning and implementation effort from a System’s Thinking perspective. Early in this journey… we learned about the presence of system causal loops in organizations, communities, in every system we interact with on a daily basis.
    One of the first causal loops we studied was this model – represented in this slide -- the Core Theory of Success -- When we were introduced to the Core Theory of Success -- which describes the importance of Quality Relationships and it’s impact on Quality Collective Thinking, we knew that organizational learning – and this particular model focused on creating and investing in Quality Relationships was a fit for NE Iowa!
    This model is quite simple and yet profound and fundamental -- As Quality Relationships (mutual trust, effective communication & sharing of information) rise – the Quality of Collective Thinking (more diverse view points shared & considered, more quality ideas emerge) increasess –and that causes an increase in the Quality of Actions and Results. Achieving high-quality results has a positive effect on the Quality of Relationships, creating a reinforcing Engine of Success.
    This model became the foundation for our work and as we invested in creating a Learning Organization for the NE Iowa Food & Fitness Initiative, we actually created our own Core Theory for Success. By articulating the Core Theory of Success for our work, we are more likely to pay attention to both the short-term and long-term consequences of our actions. (I am happy to share the diagram of our detailed theory of success with any of you who might be interested after this presentation.)
  • ANN
  • Slide 12
    KATHY
    Framework for Planning; Hierarchy of Choices (Daniel Kim – Foresight as the Central Ethic of Leadership)
    With a working knowledge of the Core Theory of Success and the importance of investing in relationships across our 6 counties, we created a organizational structure for planning that represented stakeholder from all 6 counties. We facilitated meetings and discussions to invest and promote the Quality of Relationships from across the region within the context of a NE Iowa Food & Fitness Initiative Regional Leadership Team, while also accomplishing work together. About 6 months into our planning, we facilitated a 2-day retreat with our FFI Regional Leadership Team where we utilized this Organizational Learning Framework for Planning – Heirarchy of Choices. In this retreat, approximately 60 people – representing a very diverse group of stakeholders (ISU Extension, Public Health, Park & Rec, DNR, city & county officials, Schools, youth, Luther College…) determined our CORE VALUES (Identity - Who are we?), FUNDAMENTAL CHOICE (Purpose - Why do we exist?), and our PRIMARY CHOICE (Vision – What do we do we want to create?)
    IDENTITY - PURPOSE – VISION – STRATEGY – TACTICS – ACTIVITIES = CAP/Community Action Plan
    Creation of a regional Shared Vision – another cornerstone of the FFI planning.
  • SLIDE 14…
    KATHY:
    What distinguishes this approach to systems change from many others is that it is an aspirational approach to planning. The focus is on creating a preferred future, in contrast to solving problems.
    The Creative Tension Model is another cornerstone framework for our work. (Daniel H. Kim and Diane Cory – adapted from Robert Fritz, 1989, The Path of Least Resistance
    The NE Iowa FFI embraced the concept of …”Vision can be a powerful force for action when it is clearly articulated and if there is genuine desire to bring it into reality”…(Daniel H. Kim Organizing for Learning – Strategies for Knowledge Creation and Enduring Change).
    As described a few minutes ago …We engaged almost 60 Stakeholders in creating the Vision; we then vetted it over the next several months in many discussions with all of the aligned work groups, county teams, and other stakeholders through out the region. We were seeking “buy-in”…commitment to a Shared Vision for the NE Iowa FFI.
    So now what? Designing a process for involving people in sharing a vision is only one part of the formula for success.
    Visioning also requires a commitment to articulating current reality with clarity and honesty – talking about daily events as they really are, not as we wish them to be. (Daniel H. Kim – Organizing for Learning)
    Current Reality – Defined as the Data, Assessments, Events observed, Interviews, etc.
    Premise of this CTM is that the gap between current reality and our vision creates STRUCTURAL TENSION (we want to RESOLVE this tension!)… and we often approach the GAP between where we are right now and where we’d like to be with a Problem-Solving approach or REACTIVE ORIENTATION. The CTM introduces the shift in our approach to resolving this tension in a Creative way – GENERATIVE ORIENTATION – focusing our efforts and investment on what we want to create instead of what we do NOT want.
    Traditionally as problem solvers, we propose elaborate schemes to define the problem, generate alternative solutions, and put the best solution into practice. If this process is successful, you might eliminate the problem. Then what you have is the absence of the problem you are solving. But what you do not have is the presence of a result you want to create.
    Major point of this model – Our SHARED VISION BECOMES THE FOCUS - GENERATIVE ORIENTATION – changes the conversation – the dynamics, the POSSIBILITIES – more likely to address things from a SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE
  • Slide 13
    ANN: The working vision of the NE Iowa FFI:
    NE Iowa is a unique place where all residents and guests experience, celebrate and promote healthy locally grown food with abundant opportunities for physical activity and play EVERY DAY.  Healthier people make stronger families and vibrant communities.
  • ANN
    Planning… engaging stakeholders from across the region to collect data and asses the current reality;
    Walkable/Bikeable Community Mapping
    Inventory of NE Iowa Built Environment – 6 counties
    School Use Survey
    NE Iowa Regional Safe Routes to School Project
    Community Assessments by Luther College Students
    All of our Assessments are posted on FFI Website; www.iowafoodandfitness.org/site/data.html
  • ANN: Young people engaged in assessing current reality; SRTS workshop – reviewing baseline mapping in communities
  • ANN: (quick review of these—don’t need in-depth stories. Point of this list will be to show EXAMPLES of the varied ways in which current reality was assessed.)
  • KATHY: Hierarchy of Choices Planning Framework
    Vision developed … Current Reality (Assessments) determined… NOW – Need to determine the HOW? Or STRATEGIES to reaching the Vision.
  • NE Iowa FFI – Community Action Plan
    3 Strategies
    School
    Local Food
    Active Living
  • ANN
    Each Strategy….
    Policy and System Change Targets
    Tactics – Yr 1 – 3
    Activities to support impact on Policy Target and support Tactics
  • Cross age teaching; High School youth teaching 2nd graders about local tomatoes…
  • Classroom education – Cross age teaching – 2nd graders learning about local cheese…
  • School gardens – 4th graders working with Farm to School Garden Coordinator to plant a garden
  • Farm to school Gardens – High school youth harvesting from their garden
  • 5th Season Workshop – engaging school food service and building capacity to incorporate local food
  • 5th Season workshop – making Ratatouille from school garden and locally procured food
  • Focus on System and Policy Change; Development of Policy Targets in each of the Strategy – Tactic areas”
    This is an example of the collaborative work completed for all of our Policy and Systems change targets…
    This Policy Target of Active Living – Walkable-Bikeable Communities
    (REVIEW questions… WHAT IS THE CHANGE? WHAT ARE THE LOCAL/STATE/FEDERAL QUESTOIONS? WHO ARE THE PLAYERS? WHAT WILL SUCCESS LOOK LIKE? HOW WILL WE MEASURE THE IMPACT? WHAT ARE THE ACTIVITIES?)
  • Examples…
  • October 2010 International Walk to School Day – Ossian (S. Winn SRTS pilot)
  • Fall 2010 Walking School Bus – Decorah – neighborhood parents as champions
  • SRTS – 5 Es – Education, Encouragement, Engineering, Enforcement, Evaluation and **ENGAGEMENT
    Bicycle Rodeo in Riceville, IA – May 2009
    140 students participated – coordinated by FFI Youth and their coach
  • October – Walk to School Day -
    Summary comments…Learning a lot! Assumptions challenged for this Strategy and the others--
    For example…“SRTS” – Walkable-bikeable communities
    IN A RURAL AREA – THIS IS A BIG SHIFT IN THINKING, ASSUMPTIONS, TRADITION.
    Finding champions…
    Ability to determine/gauge READINESS – know what to do to build capacity for readiness…
    Coming to the conversations as LEARNERS vs. KNOWERS
  • Naccho ppt ffi final oct 28,2010

    1. 1. Investing in the future of Allamakee, Chickasaw, Clayton, Fayette, Howard & Winneshiek Counties Ann Mansfield Co-Convener & Project Coordinator Kathleen Zurcher Organizational Learning & Systems Thinking Consultant
    2. 2. NACCHO Webinar Goals • Have an increased understanding of the importance of using a collaborative approach based in relationship building and system change • Gain greater understanding of the process involved in making policy, systems, and environmental changes in rural areas • Identify successful strategies for rural areas to improve the policies, systems, and environment to support health and prevent obesity. As a result of the webinar participants will:
    3. 3. Session Outline I. Brief introduction to the Initiative II. Assumptions that Define our Approach III. Our Organizational Learning/Systems Thinking Approach IV. Plans and Preliminary Successes V. A short list of organizational learning/systems thinking resources
    4. 4. I. Introduction to the Initiative
    5. 5. II. Our Defining Assumptions • Articulate a compelling purpose, shared core values, and a clear picture of the future • Citizen engagement is the centerpiece of our work, especially youth engagement. • Build on the community assets, values, strengths, and what is going well in communities
    6. 6. • “Policy” includes practices & institutional policies, as well as legislation at all levels. • Using a systems approach we focus on: – the system most likely to result in the future we want – all components of that system – relationships among the components – investments that will have the most impact on creating that system and our desired results
    7. 7. • We work in service of the whole, while maintaining our organizational and individual identities. • Partnerships are critical to the work, but challenging at the same time. • Embed the work in existing organizations and infrastructures to assure sustainability
    8. 8. III. Our Organizational Learning/ Systems Thinking Approach
    9. 9. Engaged community members & organizations
    10. 10. Assessing Current Reality The Built Environment  Walkable/Bikable Community Mapping (2008)  Inventory of NE Iowa Built Environment (2008)  School Use Survey (2008)  NE IA Regional Safe Routes to School Project (2008)  Children’s Bill of Rights Survey Results (2008)  Park Survey in Winneshiek County (2008)  Walkability of Trails in Decorah (2008)  Community Assessments by Luther College Students (2007 & 2008) www.iowafoodandfitness.org
    11. 11. The Food System • Annual Reports of NE Iowa Food & Farm Coalition; 2007, 2008, 2009 • Consumer household survey 2007 • Institutional survey results 2007 • Food shed mapping School Food • School site visits – School Wellness and Food service • Concession stand surveys, 2008 • School food service survey, 2009 • Annual Farm to School Chapter Report, 2009
    12. 12. What can we make clearer for you before we move to the next section?
    13. 13. IV. Plans & Preliminary Successes
    14. 14. Community Action Plan Strategy A • Ensure that school district policies & practices support healthy living of children, families and community members. Strategy B • Ensure that local, health-promoting food is available and affordable in all communities, neighborhoods and institutions. Strategy C • Ensure that communities have a built environment that supports abundant opportunities for physical activity and play.
    15. 15. Strategy A: Ensure that school district policies & practices support healthy living of children, families and community members. Policy and System Change Targets: • Procurement policy allows for geographical preference of local foods in schools • Identify and interpret existing policies that align and support geographic preference of local foods in schools
    16. 16. Strategy A: Ensure that school district policies & practices support healthy living of children, families and community members. Examples of Tactics • Support a regional learning community that nurtures quality relationships, leads to policy successes, and advances the Food and Fitness Initiative vision. • Encourage and support school districts to develop an active school wellness committee to align with the Food & Fitness Initiative. • Incorporate healthy local foods into school food programs while teaching people about nutrition and the local food system. • Regionally, communicate and support comprehensive state and federal school food and beverage policy implementation to ensure school food includes healthy, especially local choices. • Build demand and support a variety of physical activity options before, during and after school time.
    17. 17. Strategy A: : Ensure that school district policies & practices support healthy living of children, families and community members. Examples of Activities to support system and policy changes: • Farm to School program in regional schools • Home Grown Lunch Week • Food Service workshops • Producers contracts • K-3 Curriculum taught by high school students • School gardens
    18. 18. Strategy A Early Successes
    19. 19. Strategy B: Ensure that local, health-promoting food is available and affordable in all communities, neighborhoods and institutions. Policy and System Change Targets : • Invest in new and existing producers who produce food for local food systems • Develop and maintain storage & processing capabilities for local food
    20. 20. Strategy B: Ensure that local, health-promoting food is available and affordable in all communities, neighborhoods and institutions. Examples of Tactics: • Regional food system learning community • Opportunities for new & existing producers to engage in local food system • Develop food safety education and consultation process for producers • Develop regional processing, distribution and storage • Increase sale and consumption of local food
    21. 21. Strategy B: Ensure that local, health-promoting food is available and affordable in all communities, neighborhoods and institutions. Examples of Activities to support system and policy changes: • Educational Speakers, Workshops & Field Days • Micro Loan Program • Entrepreneurial Networking • Mini-grants • Regional Food Directory • Development of Food Safety Certification process
    22. 22. Strategy B Early Successes • NE Iowa Food and Farm Coalition Annual Report – 2010; Local food sales have doubled in last year • Luther College—Sodexo—GROWN Locally, food safety certification of local producers • School Food Service Workshops – Building capacity for local food and school garden produce in our schools
    23. 23. Strategy C: Ensure that communities have a built environment that supports abundant opportunities for physical activity and play. Policy and System Change Target: • Develop and maintain infrastructure for walking and bicycling to and from schools in rural communities.
    24. 24. Examples of Tactics: • Support a regional active living learning community • Encourage and support school districts to develop an active school wellness committee to align with the Food & Fitness Initiative • Foster relationships between schools and communities around opportunities to support school wellness committees and active transportation to and from school • Regionally, promote youth and family participation in physical activity and play every day Strategy C: Ensure that communities have a built environment that supports abundant opportunities for physical activity and play.
    25. 25. Strategy C: Ensure that communities have a built environment that supports abundant opportunities for physical activity and play. Examples of Activities to support systems and policy change: • Develop Safe Routes to School teams in school-communities in 6 counties • Teams will create plans to promote walking and biking to school in their community. • Conduct SRTS assessments • Provide educational Speakers; Engagement, Education and Encouragement
    26. 26. What is the Change? Local Questions Potential Key Players Local State Questions Potential Key Players State Federal Questions Potential Key Players Walking and bicycling infrastructure exits in communities for children and adults to use for local transportation How many children walk or bike to and from school? How many adults use walking or biking for local transportation? What is the infrastructure that currently exists for walking and biking? What is needed to improve the infrastructure for walking and biking? • School board members • PTA • Wellness Policy Team • School Administration • County/City Dept. of Health, Planning, Public Safety, Transportation • Health Providers • Biking and Trail groups Are there state policies regarding children getting to and from school as it relates to walking and biking? If yes, what are they? What are the state opportunities for funding for development and maintenance of walking and bicycling infrastructure? • Iowa Dept. of Education, Iowa Dept. Public Health, Public Safety, Transportation • State Legislators • Iowa State Board of Education • Iowa Healthy Kids Task Force • Iowa Partners for Healthy Kids • State Associations for Physical Education/Activity, Sports, Health, PTA, Biking, Public Safety What policies in the Transportation Bill relate to infrastructure for walking and bicycling? What are the federal opportunities for funding for development and maintenance of walking and bicycling infrastructure? US Departments of Education, Transportation, Public Safety Nat’l Conference State Legislatures House and Senate Committees on Education and Transportation Staff of Senators Harkin and Grassley; Representative Braley and Rep. Latham Nat’l health, Public Safety and Physical Activity Groups What might success look like? Increased number of youth walking or biking to school. How might we measure the impact? Increased number of youth reporting walking & # bikes ridden to school on Fall and Spring dates. What Activities will help us activate our Tactic, leading to policy and system change? Assessments Educational Speakers Safety Routes to School mini- grants in 6 target schools. Strategy C: Ensure that communities have a built environment that supports abundant opportunities for physical activity and play. Physical Activity and Built Environment Tactic: Regionally increase youth and family participation opportunities, programming, and system/plans for physical activity and active play every day. Policy Target #4: Development/maintenance of infrastructure for walking and bicycling to and from schools in rural communities.
    27. 27. Strategy C Early Successes • Six pilot schools – forming teams, reviewing mapping, etc. • Mark Fenton visit and SRTS workshops in 2009-2010 • Regional awareness and promotion – Bicycle Rodeos, Physical activity promotional events • Walking School Bus
    28. 28. Strategy C Early Successes
    29. 29. V. Resources to Support Applying Organizational Learning/Systems Thinking in Rural Communities Pegasus Communications: www.pegasuscom.com and Publications from Pegasus, especially: Organizing for Learning by Daniel H. Kim Foresight as the Central Ethic of Leadership by Daniel H. Kim, Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership, www.greanleaf.org Systems Thinking in Action Conference held annually in November. Sponsored by Pegasus Communications. This year it is scheduled for November 8-10 in Boston. Kathleen Zurcher, kzurcher33@gmail.com For more information about the Northeast Iowa Food & Fitness Initiative: Ann Mansfield, mansan01@luther.edu
    30. 30. Investing in the future of Allamakee, Chickasaw, Clayton, Fayette, Howard & Winneshiek Counties www.iowafoodandfitness.org
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