Bns slide library april 2012
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Bns slide library april 2012

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Collection of data from various web site about the cost of home care versus other types of long term care. Statistics on healthcare. Long term care insurance. Resistance to care. Caring from a ...

Collection of data from various web site about the cost of home care versus other types of long term care. Statistics on healthcare. Long term care insurance. Resistance to care. Caring from a distance.

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  • This is not meant to be an exhaustive list. There are many resources on the web dedicated to caregivers! The challenge is wading through them to find sites that are truly helpful. <br />

Bns slide library april 2012 Bns slide library april 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • Bullock’s Nursing Service Home Healthcare and skilled nursing since 1978
  • Welcome to the Sandwich Generation  More than 65 million Americans provide care to a disabled or aged friend or family member.  The cast majority of caregivers – nearly 90% - are family members.  30% of caregivers care for more than one person.  The average duration of caregiving is more than 4 years. 2
  • The Sandwich Generation    The proportion of adult children providing personal care and/or financial assistance to a parent has more than tripled over the past 15 years. The total estimated aggregate lost wages, pension, and Social Security benefits of these caregivers of parents is nearly $3 trillion. For women the total individual amount of lost wages due to leaving the labor force early and/or reduced hours of work because of caregiving responsibilities equals $142,693. The estimated impact of caregiving on lost Social Security benefits is $131,351. A very conservative estimated impact on pensions is approximately $50,000. Thus, in total, the cost impact of caregiving on the individual female caregiver in terms of lost wages and Social Security benefits equals $324,044. 3
  • Facts and Statistics  According to AARP, the value of unpaid hours for all family caregivers is $375B annually.  23M households are currently providing eldercare for aging family members.  37% of caregivers had to reduce their work hours or quit their jobs to handle their care responsibilities. 4
  • 5 Considerations for in-home care 1. Independence. In-home care allows your loved one to stay in their home and to remain as independent as possible. 2. Family involvement in care. Those who are cared for at home have the advantage of open visiting hours. Family members can help out as necessary without concerns about intruding in the care of others. 3. Continuity of care. Because your loved one is able to stay at home, they can continue to see the same doctor, so the continuity of their care remains intact. 4. A personal environment. Of course, moving to an assisted living facility or nursing home can be quite difficult for an elder. In-home care keeps your loved one in an environment they know and trust. 5. Lower costs. Traditionally, in-home care costs are lower than those found in assisted living facilities or nursing homes. You and your elder get to select the hours of service, only using it when your loved one needs the help the most. Take time to research the various options for elder care, so when you do make the decision, you'll know the choice was the right one. 5
  • 4 Reasons to choose in-home care  Home care promotes freedom. Individuals receiving home care can engage in their traditional day-to-day activities as their health dictates, while getting the care and support they need.  Home care provides for control. Home care allows your loved one to remain a participant in their own care.  Home care is flexible and personalized. Home care can be tailored to the needs of each individual. You and your loved one can dictate the type of care needed and when that care should be provided.  Home care relieves the caregiving burden. In-home care services reduce the day-to-day caregiving responsibilities. Instead of being heaped upon a single family member, those duties can be shared as needed with a professional caregiver. 6
  • 4 Considerations for assisted living 1. Facility size - Would your elder prefer to live in a large complex with amenities such as a gym? Or, would they like to live in a smaller residential home with only a few other elders? 2. Social activities. Does the assisted living facility offer recreational activities? Menu - What type of food does the assisted living facility provide? If your loved one has special dietary needs, can the facility meet those needs? 3. Transportation - Does the facility provide transportation services for its residents? 4. Cost - What is the base monthly fee for living at the facility? Are there other costs for additional services or amenities? To find the right fit for your loved one, tour the different facilities you're interested in (with your loved one, if possible). Put together a checklist of questions to ask and find out if the facility offers the staff, environment, cost, and amenities that can help your loved one transition to their new phase of life. 7
  • Questions to ask before becoming your parent’s caregiver              What are the personal sacrifices I will have to make in order to properly look after my parent? What are the sacrifices my spouse and children will have to make in order for me to look after my parent? Will there be financial burden? Will my employer notice and object to my devoting time each day to my parent’s welfare? Will too much time away from work cost me my job? How much do I know about care giving? Do I have the time to do this properly? Will I be able to do enough, or will I always feel professional caregivers would have done a better job? Will I be offended or become resentful if my care giving efforts are taken for granted? Is there any way in which my being my parent’s caregiver could damage my relationship with that person? Will my spouse and/or children object to my devoting time each day to my parent’s welfare? Will my parent accept me as their homemaker/caregiver? Is this what they want? Can I integrate some professional care along with my own services to allow myself a break now and again? 8
  • Long-term care costs Service Monthly Annually 24 x 7 Home Care $18,720 $224,640 12 x 7 Home Care $9,360 $112,320 8 x 7 Home Care $6,420 $74,880 Assisted Living $4,645 $55,740 Nursing Home/Rehab $10,500 $126,000 Adult Day Care (8 x 5) $2,200 $26,400 Home care costs assume a nurse’s aide at $26 per hour. Adult day care assumes $100 per day including meals. Assisted living and nursing home costs taken from averages of the MetLife Market Survey of Long Term Care Costs. 9
  • Long Term Care Costs - MA 10
  • Long Term Care Costs - RI 11
  • Helpful Resources  MetLife Mature Market Institute  AARP  Genworth caregiving.genworth.com Your local Council on Aging (MA) or DEA (RI) http://www.eldercare.gov/            metlife.com/mmi/ aarp.org/home-family/caregiving/ National Family Caregivers Association Family Caregiver Alliance caregiver.org Mindingyourelders.com http://www.caremanager.org/ Agingcare.com Caring.com Ourparents.com Children of Aging Parents (CAPS) National Institute on Aging National Aging in Place Coalition 12
  • The Sandwich Generation The "Sandwich Generation" is dealing with one of the most elaborate juggling acts – caring for an elderly parent, parenting their own children while working a full time job. Nearly 66 million Americans are care givers and the average care giver is 49 year old woman who not only holds down a job but also spends about 19 hours a week providing care to a loved one.  13
  • Sandwich Generation Stats             89% percent of all women over age 18 will be caregivers to children, parents or Most women will spend 17 years caring for children and 18 years helping an elderly parent. 44% of Americans between the ages of 45 and 55 have aging parents or in-laws as well as children under 21. The Sandwich Generation phenomenon. 59%-75% of family or informal caregivers are women. The average caregiver is age 46, female, married and working outside the home earning an annual income of $35,000 per year. Nearly half of all baby boomers aged 45-55 have children still living at home and elder care responsibilities. 64% of caregivers are employed full-time or part-time. More than 14 million US workers care for aging family members. Fastest growing population group is older Americans. Most rapid population growth is among people 85+ with the majority being females. An estimated 7 to 10 million adult children are caring for their parents from a long distance. Nearly two-thirds of Americans under age 60 think they will have elder care responsibilities in the next ten years. 14
  • Caregiver Profiles           44% of Americans between the ages of 45 and 55 have aging parents or inlaws as well as children under 21. 59%-75% of family or informal caregivers are women. The average caregiver is age 46, female, married and working outside the home earning an annual income of $35,000 per year. Nearly half of all baby boomers aged 45-55 have children still living at home and elder care responsibilities. 64% of caregivers are employed full-time or part-time. More than 14 million US workers care for aging family members. Fastest growing population group is older Americans. Most rapid population growth is among people 85+ with the majority being females. An estimated 7 to 10 million adult children are caring for their parents from a long distance. Nearly two-thirds of Americans under age 60 think they will have elder care responsibilities in the next ten years. 15
  • Caregiving Trends of the Future  Continued increase in prevalence of caregiving for American families  Increasing numbers of working caregivers  Increase in male caregivers  Increase in long-distance caregivers 16
  • Time and Money   Time: Average length of time spent on caregiving was about eight years, with about one-third of the respondents providing care for 10 or more years. Money: Almost all respondents reported helping the care recipient with some expenses, most frequently with food, transportation, or medications. On average, caregivers helped with expenses for two to six years and spent a total of $19,525 in out-of-pocket expenses. 17
  • Difficult Decisions to Make In Home care makes sense when.... •The person wants to remain in their home •They are uncomfortable in a group living situation •They find it difficult to meet new people •They require more care than is generally supplied by a facility •They need assistance with ambulating 18
  • Decisions Continued.... Assisted Living facilities make sense when.... •The person needs more socialization •They need just basic personal care and assistance •They enjoy activity and meeting new people •They can adjust quickly to new surroundings •They can ambulate on their own 19
  • Home Care vs. Assisted Living Home Care Advantages + Allows “aging in place” with family + Less disruption in lifestyle + Can attend adult day care if socialization is needed + Independence and control Disadvantages − High cost − Can be burdensome to family members − Supervision limited to hours of care selected Assisted Living + Affordable + 24 hour support and supervision + One monthly cost + Facilities designed for safety + Nutritional and fitness support + Housekeeping + Socialization − Separation from home and family − Low independence and control 20
  • Resistance to Care: Solutions       Involve the elder in care decisions and discussions Be honest Choose your battles wisely Check for troublesome environmental factors (lighting , temperature, noise) Learn how to “redirect” to eliminate confrontation Learn how to be comfortable with “fiblets” 21
  • A Geriatric Care Manager....    Is a health and human services specialist who helps families who are caring for older relatives Is trained and experienced in any of several fields related to care management, including, nursing, gerontology, social work, or psychology, with a specialized focus on issues related to aging and elder care Is an experienced guide and resource for families of older adults and others with chronic needs, including helping those suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease or Parkinson’s or exhibiting symptoms of dementia 22
  • Long distance caregiving      Plan a visit – check out: – What is the food situation (contents of refrigerator) – Bills paid? Look at recent checks and bank statements – Bathing and grooming habits – Driving habits – Condition of the house (inside and out) Make a list of nearby contacts (family, friends, doctors) with phone numbers. Call them periodically to check-in. Establish online back account access Talk to a Geriatric Care Manager and visit: http://www.caremanager.org/ Aging agencies – every local area has one. Visit http://www.eldercare.gov/ 23
  • Caregiving: Yes, There’s an App for That       Medicine Cabinet – lets you keep a list of medications for one or more individuals iBiomed – an application for iPhone and iPad that allows the caregiver and the individual to synchronize information that’s being tracked Elder 411 – is specifically for caregivers of a senior – tips and advice Elder 911 –includes valuable advice on how to navigate through a significant crisis or event in an elderly loved one’s life Caregiver’s Touch – a powerful application that allows the user to sync the iPhone with the web and share vital information with others such as Doctors or family members The AT Health Tracker – lets you monitor important health indicators such as weight, blood glucose levels, blood pressure 24
  • Interviewing Home Care Agencies                How long has the agency been serving this community? Does the agency have any printed brochures describing the services it offers and how much they cost? If so, get one. Does the agency have a current license to practice (if required in the state where you live)? Does the agency offer seniors a “Patients’ Bill of Rights” that describes the rights and responsibilities of both the agency and the senior being cared for? Does the agency write a plan of care for the patient (with input from the patient, his or her doctor and family), and update the plan as necessary? How closely do supervisors oversee care to ensure quality? Are agency staff members available around the clock, seven days a week, if necessary? Does the agency have a nursing supervisor available to provide on-call assistance 24 hours a day? How are agency caregivers hired and trained? What is the procedure for resolving problems when they occur, and who can I call with questions or complaints? Will the agency provide a list of references for its caregivers? Who does the agency call if the home health care worker cannot come when scheduled? What type of employee screening is done? Can the agency provide references from other existing clients? Can I interview some of the caregivers? 25