THE INVOKE XPERIENCE SERIES
Why Are Millennials So Unhealthy?
Insights Report
| JUNE 2015
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
The Background
2
 What we think we know about Millennials
• Many people have the percep...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential3
Methodology Overview
• How?
• Millennials
• Participation could be from any location wh...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
The Study Details
4
 Who did we talk to?
• Millennials, ages 18-35 (35% 18-25/65% 26-35...
5
WHAT DID WE LEARN?
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential6
 Overall, Millennials really do care about their overall health and wellness, and not
...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential7
 When it comes to a healthy diet, Millennials
also seem to place greater importance on...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential8
 Although not as important as healthy eating,
Millennials do view physical activity as...
9
WHAT CAN BE DONE TO CHANGE THIS?
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential10
Things to Consider
 Millennials need to be educated on the importance of calories in ...
11
RESEARCH FINDINGS
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential12
• “I work out at least 30 minutes, 5 or 6 days a week.
This helps me have more energy ...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential13
While taking good care of their physical health is
seen as important, many Millennials...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
Health and wellness are universally important to Millennials with many
seeing a healthy ...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential15
• “Sit in the office all the day , don't have
enough time for exercises” (Male, 26-35)...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
Most Millennials view themselves as somewhat healthy as they don’t have
serious medical ...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
“Medical Doctors are the
best way to find the health
information you need. Most
trustwor...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
Given current guidelines regarding a healthy diet, it is not surprising
that Millennials...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
Millennials cannot always afford healthy foods or have the time to cook
healthy meals bu...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
While Millennials believe its important to avoid processed foods, eat
natural foods, nea...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
Nearly 2/3 of Millennials are at least moderately active, participating in
things like w...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential
Many Millennials cite lack of motivation or commitment as
the greatest barrier to exerci...
© Invoke Solutions - Confidential23
ABOUT INVOKE
Since 1999, Invoke has helped
its clients better understand
their custome...
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Why Are Millennials So Unhealthy? Insights Report

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Using our patented technology for hosting large-scale online research events, we conducted a live research session with Millennials recruited across the US.

During the webinar we watched the research unfold in real-time, and the format allowed us to insert on-the-fly questions and combine qualitative perspectives with quantitative sample sizes.

As an outcome of the live research event, Jennafer Stahl, VP of Research and Insights, created a report that explores why Millennials behave the way they do, and what can be done to change their behavior and health outcomes.

Feel free to contact us with any questions you may have at inquiry@invoke.com.

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Why Are Millennials So Unhealthy? Insights Report

  1. 1. THE INVOKE XPERIENCE SERIES Why Are Millennials So Unhealthy? Insights Report | JUNE 2015
  2. 2. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential The Background 2  What we think we know about Millennials • Many people have the perception that Millennials are healthier than previous generations, primarily because this generation has consistently had greater access to healthier foods, physical activities and health resources. • Additionally, this generation is known for sharing images and information of the beautiful meals and snacks they eat and the activities they are participating in. • All of this makes it easy to assume that they MUST be really healthy.  BUT here is what we actually know • The proportion of young adults who are obese has tripled since 1974* • Roughly 2/3 of millennials do not have regular physical activity* • Nearly 1/3 smoke cigarettes* • Approximately 1/3 use illegal drugs * Health, United States, 2008, with a special feature on the Health of Young Adults..; CDC, NCHS So why--despite all of their available resources and talk about living a healthy lifestyle--are Millennials so unhealthy?
  3. 3. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential3 Methodology Overview • How? • Millennials • Participation could be from any location where there was internet access Observers watched session from any location with an Internet connection: • Reviewing live feedback using a dashboard with built-in analytical tools • Discussing and reacting to results with colleagues • Ensuring that they received the actionable insights they needed Moderator lead back-room discussion during the live event: • Analyzing key words trending in verbatims • Reviewing quant metrics • Filtering findings by segment • Inserting on-the-fly questions • Initiating 1:1 chats Invoke conducted a live research event that included researchers, decision makers, and consumers
  4. 4. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential The Study Details 4  Who did we talk to? • Millennials, ages 18-35 (35% 18-25/65% 26-35) • Geographically dispersed across regions (East, Midwest, South) • 46% males/54% females • HHI Income: 23% Less than $50,000/24% $75,000/53% $75k+  What did we do? • A 30 minute, live online discussion with 72 participants on June 10, 2015 at 1pm ET • The discussion included a mix of both open and closed ended questions in a conversational flow • Both closed and open-ended questions were added on-the- fly to delve deeper into Millennials’ mindset  Detailed banner tables, segmented by demographic are also available upon request
  5. 5. 5 WHAT DID WE LEARN?
  6. 6. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential6  Overall, Millennials really do care about their overall health and wellness, and not just because they will look good. They care because it will allow the to live a longer and healthier life .  When describing the drivers of wellness, many attribute it to a healthy diet, exercise and mental health—aspects which they all claim to take actions to support.  While they acknowledge that a balance between healthy diet and physical activity are important to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, Millennials tend to place greater importance on diet than on physical activity. Even their assessment of their overall health relies more heavily on the types of foods they eat rather than the amount of physical activity they perform.  Millennials also use their dietary habits as a measurement of their health relative to their parents— indicating that they perceived themselves as healthier than their parents mainly because they ate better (although it should be noted that many referenced that their parents suffered from chronic illnesses which they attributed to poor dietary habits).  Despite their greater focus on a healthy diet, many Millennials are indulging in fast food, taking shortcuts when time is short and not counting calories. Key Insights  When asked what habits have the most negative impact on their overall health, many indicated that they regularly ate junk food (fast food, fatty/salty snacks, sweets, etc.) either because they were giving into a craving or it was a convenient way to grab something to eat when they were too busy—or tired—to prepare a healthy meal,
  7. 7. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential7  When it comes to a healthy diet, Millennials also seem to place greater importance on the type of food they are eating (fresh produce, lean proteins) rather than the amount of calories they are consuming.  Despite numerous expert sources indicating that a healthy weight is predicated on the amount of calories in and amount of calories out, many Millennials rank counting calories as a relatively unimportant aspect of a healthy lifestyle. Key Insights  They instead seem to focus on what types of foods they are consuming—unprocessed, whole and natural—believing that these types of food will automatically translate to a healthy diet and not realizing that even organic, raw almonds are a relatively calorie dense food can lead to weight gain.  Millennials—both men and women—indicated that they could be motivated to improve their dietary habits if they had a support network upon which to rely— whether it be family, friends or professional support.  Millennials view the idea of being surrounded by like-minded individuals as a great way for them to receive the encouragement they would need to make and maintain dietary changes. This presumption is also supported by years of research which has shown that the most successful weight loss programs include peer support. * ”Talk Off the Pounds: Maintaining a strong support network will help you reach your weight loss goals“ November 3, 2011, Prevention (Jorge Cruise) / Best Weight-Loss Diets, US News and World Reports
  8. 8. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential8  Although not as important as healthy eating, Millennials do view physical activity as a key factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and living a long life.  In fact many Millennials acknowledge that they feel less stressed after they exercise.  When it comes to physical activity, most Millennials would classify themselves as at least moderately active, although this activity might be coming from daily activities rather than engaging in a regular exercise program. (Millennials who are participating in regular exercise tend to focus on running, walking and/or strength training.) Key Insights  While many Millennials indicated they try to work exercise into their daily lives, they often faced the challenge of not enough time or energy and note that by the end of the day they simply didn’t have the energy to work up the motivation to exercise.  As we saw with dietary habits, Millennials also indicated that they could benefit from a support network or some other method that would hold them accountable to an exercise regime.  While many seemed to prefer the idea of working out with a friend, family member or even a personal trainer, others seemed to view a mobile app or fitness tracker as an acceptable tool to keep them on course.
  9. 9. 9 WHAT CAN BE DONE TO CHANGE THIS?
  10. 10. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential10 Things to Consider  Millennials need to be educated on the importance of calories in and calories out in maintaining a healthy weight.  Given Millennials distrust of the media and social media outlets, these would not be the ideal sources, but rather parents, medical professionals and medical websites should be used to get this message out.  Healthy food choices need to be more convenient and affordable.  Creating single serve packages that are not cost prohibitive and make it easy for busy Millennials to not only have something healthy to eat when they are on the go, but which also makes it easy for them to eat an appropriate serving size could help them make the right food choices.  Make it easy and convenient for Millennials to find and participate in support networks, giving them a way to connect with like-minded individuals and remain motivated to stick to their regimes.  And make sure that these seem to be age appropriate and not something they would see their mother or grandmother at.  Mobile apps and fitness trackers are also another motivational tool to improve Millennials overall health and wellness.  A hurdle faced by many Millennials to maintaining a healthy lifestyle was commitment, something that could be overcome with tools which will help them track their progress and hold them accountable to short and long term goals.
  11. 11. 11 RESEARCH FINDINGS
  12. 12. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential12 • “I work out at least 30 minutes, 5 or 6 days a week. This helps me have more energy and makes me want to make healthy food choices as well.” (Female, 18- 25) • “Regular exercise and eating healthy food gives us energy boosts and its good for our body” (Female, 26- 35) • “I participate in a lot of sports with friends! Multiple times a week we will go to our gym and exercise and stay fit!” (Male, 18-25) • “Eating a healthy and well balanced meal. It is good for me because I try to make sure I am always getting the vitamins and nutrition that I need.” (Male, Age 26-35) • “Exercise daily. It is a stress reliever and I maintain a good body.” (Male, 18-25) • “I eat unhealthy snacks.This is bad for my health because of all the bad chemicals and the trans fat they include. I enjoy eating them.” (Male, 18-25) • “Eat snack foods far too often. I should choose healthier food options. I do it because I enjoy some unhealthy foods.” (Female, 18-25) • “Eating junk food like candy and chips but they taste sooooooo good!!!” (Male, 26-35) • “The unhealthiest thing I do snack too often. I do it out of boredom a lot and also just because I grave it and don't have the greatest self control when it comes to food :)” (Female, 26-35) Regular exercise and a healthy diet are the healthiest Millennial habits, although they do enjoy unhealthy snacks, sometimes a bit too much. Eating healthy food and exercising regularly are the healthiest habits of Millennials... …but they do like to indulge in unhealthy snacks like chips and candy.
  13. 13. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential13 While taking good care of their physical health is seen as important, many Millennials also believe a healthy mind also has a strong impact on wellness. • “Eat properly, and exercise. Fitness and healthy food are good for the body” (Male, 18-25) • “I think the best thing can do is have good eating habits and exercise regularly .because it helps prevent really bad issues that will occur like diabetes.” (Male, 26-35) • “Eat healthy and nutritious meals because if you're healthy the body thanks you for it and that will affect your chemical and spiritual growth in a positive way.” (Female, 18-25) • “I think overall health starts with food. It's the fuel for our bodies and influences digestions, skin health, and how we feel.When we eat healthy, nutritious meals, we set ourselves up for health.” (Female, 26-35) Fueling the body with healthy food and exercising are viewed as the having the greatest impact on health as it helps prevent health issues and can generate positive attitudes. 6% 10% 13% 24% 25% Manage stress Have a positive attitude Get consistent and adequate sleep Exercise regularly Eat healthy and nutritious meals Top 5 Most Important Factors for Living a Healthy Life
  14. 14. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential Health and wellness are universally important to Millennials with many seeing a healthy body as the path to living a more fulfilled and happy life. 14 23% 77% 100% 17% 83% 100% 21% 79% 100% Somewhat important Very important Top 2 Importance of Health & Wellness Total 18 to 25 years 26 to 35 years • “I want to be healthy in order to live a happier longer time, in the company of my friends and family.” (Male, 18-25) • “I'm a mother of 4 and I want to be a positive example to them. I also want to be able to do things that I otherwise wouldn't be able to if I wasn't healthy. I want to be around as long as possible for my children.” (Female, 26-35) While many believe that a healthy body is an important reason to care about health an wellness, many also look beyond the body to the higher order benefits—greater success in life, emotional payoffs, etc. 74% of Millennials think the most important reasons to care about health and wellness revolves around living longer and preventing illness. • “l am very big into nutrition since I believe it has many positive effects.Along with mental health- you can't help someone without helping yourself first. It's not selfish- just realistic.” (Female, 18-25) • “Because the healthier I am the more likely I am to achieve my goals and provide a better life for me and my family” (Male, 26-35)
  15. 15. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential15 • “Sit in the office all the day , don't have enough time for exercises” (Male, 26-35) • “It is expensive to live healthy. you see all the fast food chains making it cheaper and cheaper to eat their food, while buying a salad costs a lot compared to that.” (Male, 18-25) • “The biggest barrier I face is time. As a full- time employee and new mother, I am super busy.” (Female, 26-35) • “Having the time to exercise with a busy life” (Female, 18-25) Finding time to be active and being able to afford the higher priced healthy foods make it difficult for many Millennials to lead healthier lives Time and Money are the greatest barriers to leading healthier lives for many Millennials. • “Time, when I'm in school, and specially towards the end of the semester, I have difficulty finding time to exercise.” (Male, 18-25) • “Eating healthy is more expensive than to eat unhealthy.This is often a barrier.” (Female, 26-35) • “Between work and a new baby, all the regular household stuff like laundry, dishes, cleaning, there just aren't enough hours in the day. If I have the choice of playing with my son or doing a workout video, my son wins out every time.” (Male, 26-35)
  16. 16. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential Most Millennials view themselves as somewhat healthy as they don’t have serious medical conditions and tend to eat fairly healthy. 16 83% 24% 59% 14% 96%B 33%b 63% 4% 77% 19% 57% 19% Top 2 Very healthy Somewhat healthy Neither healthy nor unhealthy Self Assessment of Health &Wellness Total (A)18 to 25 years (B)26 to 35 years • “I exercise regularly and have no health problems. I may not be the thinnest in m family but I am the healthiest” (Female, 18-25) • “I have stress in life, and financial worries, however I consider myself very healthy, because I do not have any major conditions that would degrade my health.” (Male, 26-35) • “I don't have any chronic diseases, I try to eat decently, and although I don't exercise regularly, my kids keep me busy and active. I could be healthier, but my health isn't poor or anything at the moment.” (Female, 26-35) Eating relatively healthy and a lack of major health conditions seems to be most Millennials barometer of how healthy they are. 69% of Millennials believe they are at least somewhat healthier than their parents because they don’t have chronic illnesses like their parents. A,B indicates statistical difference at 90% confidence level a,b indicates statistical difference at 80% confidence level.
  17. 17. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential “Medical Doctors are the best way to find the health information you need. Most trustworthy and reliable. Most of time they are there to answer your questions.” (Male, 26-35) “Medical professionals have been educated and trained in the diagnosis of illnesses and they do that daily, making them a trustable source.” (Male, 18-25) Medical professions, because of their education and training are viewed as the primary source for health information. 17 9% 17% 57% A 12% 20% 32% 10% 18% 49% Family members Websites like WebMD or The Mayo Clinic Medical professionals Primary Source for Health Information Total (A)18 to 25 years (B)26 to 35 years A,B indicates statistical difference at 90% confidence level a,b indicates statistical difference at 80% confidence level. “I have a long relationship with my doctor. She knows my medical history so I trust what she has to say. She's also very educated and knows what she's talking about..” (Female, 26-35) • “I might not consider the media as much, because I feel like the media is fueled by industries that want your money.They might tell you only what they want you to know.” • “Social Media. You don't know who posted the information on social media or if the info they posted is accurate and/or correct. You just can't trust it when it's concerning something as important as your health.” Social Media, the Media and Health Insurers seem to be the least reliable outlets for medical information seen as receptacles for rumor and corporate agendas.
  18. 18. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential Given current guidelines regarding a healthy diet, it is not surprising that Millennials focus primarily on eating fresh produce, lean proteins and regular meals. 18 33% 35% 38% 43% 47% 53% 56% 60% 62% 69% I eat mainly fast food I eat only organic foods I eat a lot of junk food and/or sweet snacks I limit the amount of salt that I eat I moderate the amount of sugar I eat My diet includes whole grains I moderate the alcohol consumption I eat regular meals My diet includes lean meats, poultry, fish I eat fresh fruits and vegetables Describes My Dietary Habits Completely/Somewhat “Eating fruits and vegies and drinking water everyday, because this makes me going and give me energy” (Female, 26-35) “Eating fruits and vegetables every day really helps keeps me feeling great and energized!Without fruits and vegetables I think I would have a lot less energy!” (Male, 18-25)
  19. 19. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential Millennials cannot always afford healthy foods or have the time to cook healthy meals but a support network could influence them to make healthier dietary choices. 19 • “The availability of cheap but also healthy foods. It's tough for me to eat better when spending a lot on items.” (Male, 26-35) • “Craving unhealthy food.” (Female, 18-25) • “I’m someone that eats way too much junk food, and when I try to stop eating that kind of food and eat healthier, the cravings get to me! I don't know if I could only eat healthy stuff and not eat any sweets or chips, it'd be hard!” (Male, 18-25) • “Sometimes you don't have the time to eat a healthy meal and need something quick. Unfortunately, quick meals mean fast food and not something healthy.” (Male, 26-35) • “I work full time, so sometimes I feel like I don't have the time or energy to cook a meal. I end up picking up take out. Also, sometimes I lose the motivation to eat as healthy as I know I should.” (Female, 26-35) • “If I had a traumatic event happen to me or if the doctor told me I was unhealthy!” (Male, 26-35) • “If my friends and family practices it with me.” (Male, 18-25) • “If my family all had the same schedule, we would be able to eat together. When I'm making food to be eaten at different times, I tend to not eat as healthy.” (Female, 26-35) • “Having a community of people who also want to be healthy would be nice.” (Male, 18-25) • “Having a health condition that caused me to need to eat certain foods.” (Female, 18-25) • “A medical illness” (Male, 26-35) • “Being around like-minded people who also want to maintain a healthy diet.“ (Female, 26-35) Cravings, affordable healthy food and a lack of time to prepare healthy meals are the most common barriers to Millennials’ healthy eating. But many say that they could be influenced to eat healthier if they had a support network and/or were facing a health challenge.
  20. 20. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential While Millennials believe its important to avoid processed foods, eat natural foods, nearly 50% don’t believe counting calories has any impact on their overall health. 20 19% 25% 31% 34% 38% 26% 25% 28% 28% 26% 15% 28% 21% 15% 19% 26% 13% 14% 11% 3% 13% 8% 7% 11% 14% Eating organic foods Counting calories Watching fat intake Eating natural foods Avoiding processed foods Importance of Dietary Habits Very important Somewhat important Neither important nor unimportant Somewhat unimportant Not at all important “When it comes to maintaining a healthy weight for a lifetime, the bottom line is – calories count! Weight management is all about balance—balancing the number of calories you consume with the number of calories your body uses or "burns off.“”* *HealthyWeight – its not a diet, it’s a lifestyle! CDC † Should You Cout Calories, Kat Barefield, MS, RD Most people believe they consume 20- 50% fewer calories than they actually do.†
  21. 21. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential Nearly 2/3 of Millennials are at least moderately active, participating in things like walking, running, stretching and strength training. 21 35% 0% 35% 29% 32% 4% 36% Top 2 Extremely active Very active Moderately activeLightly active Sedentary Bottom 2 Self Assessment of PhysicalActivity Millennials are more likely to say they are less stressed after exercising and this idea of stress-relief often fuels more exercise. However, this same stress can also be a barrier to exercise as they skip it when they are stressed.† † Exercise: A healthy stress reliever. American Physical Association
  22. 22. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential Many Millennials cite lack of motivation or commitment as the greatest barrier to exercising but believe that having someone/thing to hold them accountable could help. 22 • “The mentality! If I had the time to workout, I would still need to have the strong mind to get myself to exercise everyday!” (Male, 18-25) • “I find it hard to get motivation. I know I need to be healthy, but laziness does set in.” (Female, 26-35) • “I think it is just me. I am the biggest barrier. If I would get out of my own way and make it a priority I think that I could do it!” (Male, 26-35) • “Lack of motivation to get up and do it everyday or several times per week. Sometimes the weather also makes it hard to be motivated.” (Male, 18-25) • “My own laziness. I hate working out” (Female, 18- 25) • “I think maybe if I had something that kept track of what I do, I would feel more obligated to keep that up to date.” (Female, 26-35) • “Maybe a formal training program that rewards you somehow. even something fun / likeWii fit perhaps.” (Male, 18-25) • “I like exercising with friends and family so the more dedicated they are to it, it helps me stay motivated.” (Female, 26-35) • “I think that having friends that are active is a big encouragement because I almost never go to the gym alone.” (Female, 18-25) • “Having someone to work out with and an end goal in mind would encourage me to work out more.” (Male, 18-25) • “Mobile apps and health programs would certainly provide great deal of motivation at the finger tips.” (Male, 26-35) Motivation and/or commitment to exercise is the greatest challenge faced by most Millennials. And many indicate that someone or something that would hold them accountable and keep them on track with their fitness goals could help motivate them to be more active. Resources Used Fitness Tracker Fitness/Health Mobile App 27% 48%
  23. 23. © Invoke Solutions - Confidential23 ABOUT INVOKE Since 1999, Invoke has helped its clients better understand their customers’ perceptions of their brands, advertising and communications. 2013 Ogilvy Award for Excellence inAdvertising 2013 “Hottest Companies in Boston”Award Jennafer Stahl VP, Research & Insights jennafer.stahl@invoke.com

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