New product development
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New product development

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http://www.inventium.com.au/ ...

http://www.inventium.com.au/

Back in 2006, Inventium’s founder, Dr Amantha Imber was working as a consumer psychologist in a big advertising agency. The agency had put her through a lot of creative thinking training which she loved. However, when she started getting deeper into researching the field, she realised that all these training companies had done was rip off Edward de Bono techniques from the 70s and re-package them as their own. She thought that, ironically, this was pretty uncreative.

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New product development New product development Document Transcript

  • p. +61 3 9018 7455 f. +61 3 9528 4787 m. +61 (0) 412 6565 38 e. info@inventium .com .au PO Box 1251, Brighton Rd LPO, Elwood, VIC, Australia 3184 Inventium http://www.inventium.com.au/ Back in 2006, Inventium’s founder, Dr Amantha Imber was working as a consumer psychologist in a big advertising agency. The agency had put her through a lot of creative thinking training which she loved. However, when she started getting deeper into researching the field, she realised that all these training companies had done was rip off Edward de Bono techniques from the 70s and re-package them as their own. She thought that, ironically, this was pretty uncreative.
  • p. +61 3 9018 7455 f. +61 3 9528 4787 m. +61 (0) 412 6565 38 e. info@inventium .com .au PO Box 1251, Brighton Rd LPO, Elwood, VIC, Australia 3184 Amantha had always been a bit of a science geek and kept reading the jargon-filled academic journals long after leaving university. She noticed that there were hundreds, if not thousands, of studies being conducted around the world that looked at what variables increased a person’s ability to think more creatively and a company’s ability to innovate. However, she realised that there was a great divide between this great research that was being done in the world of academia, and what was actually getting used in the ‘real world’. So in 2007, she had the idea of starting a company that applied the science of psychology and neurology to boosting creativity and innovation - something that had never been done before. Since Inventium opened its doors, Amantha and her team, have helped literally thousands of people across Australia, the United States, the UK, Europe, Africa and New Zealand improve their ability to generate great ideas.
  • p. +61 3 9018 7455 f. +61 3 9528 4787 m. +61 (0) 412 6565 38 e. info@inventium .com .au PO Box 1251, Brighton Rd LPO, Elwood, VIC, Australia 3184 5 Ways To Better Your Business Enterprise Being in a business, any business, is hard. What you need are some valuable insights on how to better your business techniques and how little changes here and there can provide a great deal. You have to be insightful and creative in order to succeed, to become a stable and respected company, sacrifices and downfalls are normal. Below are some techniques you can utilize to set your business feet firmly on the ground and towards the right path. 1. Attack from different angles, there is always another way. If you feel like you are doing something deficient, like there is this thing lacking and you know you could do better, and then do better. There is no limit to what techniques you can come up with; the only limit is the effectiveness of the new techniques you make. For example, how can you make a 5 days’ worth of work compress into 3 days? Find ways, exhaust all options and you will arrive to a solution that may or may not be something worth pursuing and applying. 2. Go deeper, attack from the core and not just from the rim. All business ideas have its core fundamentals to stick to and if you make positive changes to it, it can change the whole system. Sudden changes aren’t going to be effective but a deeper analysis of the whole, and a constructive upgrade can make a big impact. This is an extensive of the above approach. 3. Know when to back off and know when to strike. There is the dilemma of not being able to provide to all your clients. The need of one most definitely does not supersede that of the other. Each client is important, but there will come a time when you will have to choose. If you can’t handle the demands of two, better let go of one of them in order for you to provide the best of what you can do to the remainder client. Losing one isn’t as hard as losing two at the same time. 4. Walk in your client’s shoes, what do they want really? Sometimes what they ask isn’t what they need. If you can provide more than what they want, if you can solve their demands
  • p. +61 3 9018 7455 f. +61 3 9528 4787 m. +61 (0) 412 6565 38 e. info@inventium .com .au PO Box 1251, Brighton Rd LPO, Elwood, VIC, Australia 3184 in a simpler form than what they require, suggest it to them. In a business, those with better ideas, better innovation techniques, those are the guys that get respected. Providing what is needed and not only what is asked for is the key to prolonging your clients trust and loyalty. 5. Follow other peoples lead. Ripping off other peoples work isn’t that bad. Look at what other people have accomplished, look over what other businesses did and follow their path. If you see a business enterprise that you want to be someday, take the steps they took and make it your own. It’s being wise that going to lead your forward, How to overcome “Team-think” Most of us have been a victim of groupthink at some stage in our working lives. If you have been sitting with the same team for the past year, you’ve probably also become a victim of ‘team-think’. This happens a lot in companies that deal with similar problems for their various clients. I work with several advertising and media agencies and often the key issue for many of their clients is generating awareness for their products. When the agency tries to generate ideas on how to do this, the strategies tend to revolve around the same few media channels, such as TV, print and outdoor campaigns, or creating a viral video and posting it on YouTube. Research suggests that teams which have been together for a while develop a set of entrenched assumptions, ways of doing things and set patterns of behaviour. The good news is there is a cure: introducing a new member to the team. Studies show that when a new member joins a team, existing assumptions, attitudes and behaviours are far less likely to be activated. The new person triggers new thoughts and behaviours. While it can be tempting to leave harmonious teams alone, rotating employees around to different teams regularly, say every 6–8 months, can considerably enhance creativity.
  • p. +61 3 9018 7455 f. +61 3 9528 4787 m. +61 (0) 412 6565 38 e. info@inventium .com .au PO Box 1251, Brighton Rd LPO, Elwood, VIC, Australia 3184 When I run idea-generation sessions for clients, I almost always insist they invite people who do not work for their company. I encourage them to include as diverse a mix of people as possible. For example, in one workshop for a national postal services organisation, we had the artistic director of a circus troupe, a creative director from an advertising agency, an 18-year-old university student and a TV host. Needless to say, the ideas generated in the workshop were wonderfully varied. So, rather than try to think creatively on your own, try to partner up with someone you don’t normally work with. Use them as a springboard for fleshing out your ideas and let them go in directions you wouldn’t if you were working on your own. Most importantly, listen to their input and be open to going in directions you would not normally. Creativity loves boundaries Letting your mind wander wherever it needs to, starting with a blank canvas and being free of rules are all considered conducive to creativity? However, the latest psychological research has shown the complete opposite. In one study, a group of adults was asked to make a construction using Lego. One group was given no constraints; they were told that they could build whatever they liked. The other group had several constraints placed upon them; they were told that their construction must contain no right-angled joints and they could only use one kind of brick. The constructions built by the ‘constraints’ group were judged to be significantly more creative and lateral than those in the ‘free expression’ group. So why does this happen? When completing tasks, we typically draw on what we know rather than seeking new ideas and opinions. Often, information retrieval becomes automated in our brains because it is useful and saves us having to come up with new solutions every time we face a problem. In
  • p. +61 3 9018 7455 f. +61 3 9528 4787 m. +61 (0) 412 6565 38 e. info@inventium .com .au PO Box 1251, Brighton Rd LPO, Elwood, VIC, Australia 3184 other words, when we are assigned a task to complete, our brains switch into autopilot if it is a familiar problem. However, this autopilot mode dramatically impairs performance when we have to think of completely novel ideas. Constraining the way we think forces us to search for new and creative ways of completing the task or solving the problem. In a paradoxical way, putting constraints on our tasks lifts the constraints on our thought processing. Here are a couple of tips to help apply these findings: - Try to avoid taking on tasks that are open-ended and overly broad. If you find yourself in this situation, challenge yourself to apply a constraint to the task to make yourself perform more creatively. - Whenever you feel yourself going into autopilot, ask your boss to apply a constraint to the task (or do it yourself).