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IT for Humans - the economics of IT
 

IT for Humans - the economics of IT

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  • Started as a redesignofuser interface from physicalto touch basedTHEN wetookthingsfurther, designed a NEW VIRTUAL CONTROL ROOM, making it possibletowork from anywhere
  • Man undviker att göraÄven standardsystem och interna system-> det måste tillgodose mina behov- behoven måste vara kända-> designen ska motsvara behoven
  • Detfinns 20 sättattbygga en funktion påDetfinnskravsomärviktigareänandra…
  • MotivatorsTornoffWhat is the challenge
  • Titta på faktisk användning idag - logganalys
  • Mer trafik på undersidor

IT for Humans - the economics of IT IT for Humans - the economics of IT Presentation Transcript

  • Case 1 2 3 (snygga kök, ink flygled) (i)Google ”remote tower SAAB”
  • Discovery Evaluating Contact Visiting SelfCare
  • “In finance, the purchase of a financial product or otheritem of value with an expectation of favorable futurereturns. In general terms, investment means the usemoney in the hope of making more money.”“In business, the purchase by a producer of aphysical good, such as durable equipment orinventory, in the hope of improving future business.”
  • • “the productivity paradox”• work-life problems• Gartner Chaos report• Very few managers do follow-ups
  • Effect ManagementEffektstyrning ®Ensure that the solution createsexpected business values (EBV) 1. Describe the EBV 2. Design for (choose based on) use 3. Validate or measure sucess continously
  • Three fatal mistakes today1. EBV are blurry Correllation?2. Design is not managed Without clear EBV : all design is equally good, difficult to evaluate3. No or little follow-up Reaching EBV? Realistic? Likely?
  • 13
  • 14
  • The basics
  • Good design Bad design
  • #1 consumer rules
  • #2 so many chioces
  • #3 in Use 3 miljon dollar button
  • Who shall we please to get there? How do we do it
  • 1. Define Effect Goals2. Define User Groups + Usage Goals3. Prioritize4. Concept Design + testing5. Detail Design + testing6. Keep track and adapt
  • Effect GoalsDescribes the Business impact.The difference when the product works as planned• First one sentence that summarizes ”what is this application/service/product : s contibution to the business?”• Always together with some Measurement Points, that desribes the meaning, and makes it possible to measure
  • Effect Goals – the good examplethe Nuclear Plant Simplified preparation for new work-orders and reporting finished work
  • Online salesMore visitors in storeStrengthen the brand
  • The web presence should:Contribute to increased usageof ACME products byfacilitating to choose ACME.Choose to buy ACME products. Choose to buy other ACME products as well.Choose to use ACME products (when they are available).Choose to recommend ACME products. Choose to evaluate a ACME product.Choose to try to convince my manager about ACME products.Choose to promote ACME to others. Continue to choose ACME
  • Measurements – the bad example
  • Objective Measurements Observed behaviors (fieldstudies, webanalytics, usag (webanalytics, calculations) e testing) Time # of (visitors, faults..) Re-purchases Patterns Conversion ratio SuccsessrateQuantitative Qualitative•Evaluating goals •Evaluating goals•Find problem areas •Understand Measured opinions Analyzed opinions problem areas (interviews, focusgroups, (surveys) usage testing) Attitudes Satisfaction Estimated time Attiitudes Estimated quality Explained behavoirs Subjective
  • Target Group AnalysisWhat do users need To find drivers, motivation needs Semistructured interviews & observation
  • Things we never askWhat do users need Would you like a x-function? What is better a or b? Instead! How do you think of “subject X” What is important for you? Tell me what makes it work! Tell me what turns you off!
  • The impatient
  • Carl the CuriousChallenge: Convince him to make contact “I want to use products that are safe and efficient for both me and my patient” The Curious has heard about a ACME product that he is curious about. He wants to know if the product meets his expectations. Even though The Curious are open to the possibility that a ACME product might suit his needs, he still need solid scientific evidence as well as recommendations from independent experts in the field before considering the product. If the call to action is clear and easy, Carl doesn’t mind taking the next step as long as his visit to the web has made him even more interested. Carl is a busy man”I usually have limited time, and want to quickly find out if though, so he need to decide on what next step he is willing to take. Meeting amy curiosity is true.” sales rep takes a lot of time, looking at a short recorded detailing is less time consuming.Usage Goals Typical Tasks Important Actions•Want to take a stand about a •Find a specific product based on what •Clear call to actionsproduct, solution or treatment. he knows about it. •Easy and luring overview over•Want an answer to a specific •Figure out if the product matches his product USP:s, benefits etc.question about the product needs and his standards. •Possible to find products based on•Shall take the next step •Learn about additional benefits apart what he knows. from the once that made him curious.
  • v/s
  • Actions, attributes= the solution, functions• Define what it takes to acheive the goals / what it takes for users to enjoy or love the service or product• Can be refined in a tree, where The leaf is the actual action The branches explains the chain of reasoning• One action can be relevant for several Usage Goals for different Target Groups
  • Time for functionality
  • Three fatal mistakes today1. EBV are blurry Correllation?2. Design is not managed Without clear EBV : all design is equally good, difficult to evaluate3. No or little follow-up Reaching EBV? Realistic? Likely?
  • The fourt (and really fatal) problemBusiness agreements are often based onfunctionalityCustomer: ”this was not what we expected”Contractor/Builder: ”the specified function isbuilt”
  • Many business agreements arebased on a function list.Certainly standard systems(e.g. enterprise systems, decisonsystems, financial systems)
  • Removed : detail effectgoals for ACMEThe message is that theycould be used for thebusiness agreement
  • Removed : SAP systemnavigation and contentfor reporting finishedwork orders
  • Effect goals are easily transformed to codeon web pages / web actions.KPI are defined to keep trackover time and make appropiate changes
  • >
  • Quality Board• Content activities• Quality activities• AnalyticsOrganization
  • Effect ManagementEffektstyrning ®Ensure that the solution creates expectedbusiness values (EBV) 1. Describe the EBV 2. Design for use 3. Validate or measure sucess
  • “In finance, the purchase of a financial product or otheritem of value with an expectation of favorable futurereturns. In general terms, investment means the usemoney in the hope of making more money.”“In business, the purchase by a producer of aphysical good, such as durable equipment or inventory,in the hope of improving future business.”
  • If you view yourself as manager ordecision maker = you are adesignerof future values• See to it that EBV are well defined• Ask the builder to ensure business values• NEVER base business agreements on functionality• Follow up!
  • ROIGet ROI from Design Forrester Report June 2001Return on investment for Usable User-Interface Design: Examples andstatistics Aron Marcus and associates, 2002Bad IT investmentsThe Chaos Report Standsih Gruop 1994-2009Infomation Technology and the Productivity ParadoxHenry Lucas, Oxford University Press, 1999The Trouble with Computers Thomas Landauer, MIT Press, 1996How to Measure Anything Douglas W Hubbard, John wiley & sons, 2007
  • Effect ManagementEffect Managing IT Ingrid Ottersten & Mijo Balic, Liber, 2002Know your user (humor)Introducing the book http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFAWR6hzZekUsage testing (serious, swedish only)http://vimeo.com/25181153