Dj Nicole Jean Piaget

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  • Legend:Underlined – definitionCapitalized – emphasisBold – explained (notes)
  • -career of scientific research began at the age of 11 with the publication of a short paper on the albino sparrow.-wrote more than 60 books and 100+ articles-later became interested in children’s intellectual development, and spent his last 60 years gathering an impressive amount of research information pertaining to mental development.-This produced an elaborate and comprehensive theory of how intelligence works.
  • -was most thought of as a child psychologist and educator though he preferred to be classified as a genetic epistemologist.-surprisingly, he also contributed in the field of computer science and AI. His works were used to develop a programming language called LOGO -His most important contribution was his theory of cognitive and affective development or more commonly known as the Theory of Cognitive Development
  • Quotation: Piaget pushes for innovation; using knowledge for improvement and for seeking ways to discover new thingsReferences:Wadsworth, Barry J. (1996). Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive and Affective Development: Foundations of Constructivism, Fifth Edition. New York: Longman Publishers. Kendra Van Wagner. Jean Piaget Biography. from Ask.com Website: http://psychology.about.com/od/profilesofmajorthinkers/p/piaget.htmImage source: http://mdubbleu.wordpress.com/2009/01/25/the-religion-in-me-adam-and-eve/
  • The Four Stages:The Sensorimotor Stage (Birth to 2 years old)The Preoperational Stage (ages 2 to 4)The Concrete Operational/Operations Stage (ages 7 to 11) The Formal Operational/Operations Stage (ages 11 to 15)
  • The infant builds an understanding of himself or herself and reality (and how things work) through interactions with the environment. It is able to differentiate between itself and other objects. Ex. Of acting intentionally: pulls a string to set mobile in motion or shakes a rattle to make a noise  Object permanence-realizes that things continue to exist even when no longer present to the sense
  • Has 6 periods * P1(0-1 mos.) * P2(1-4 mos.) * P3(4-8 mos.) * P4(8-12 mos.) * P5(12-18 mos.) * P6(18-24 mos.)
  • Has 6 periods * P1(0-1 mos.) * P2(1-4 mos.) * P3(4-8 mos.) * P4(8-12 mos.) * P5(12-18 mos.) * P6(18-24 mos.)
  • Classifies objects by a single feature: e.g. groups together all the red blocks regardless of shape or all the square blocks regardless of color egocentric: has difficulty taking the viewpoint of others 
  • Accommodation is increased-The child begins to think abstractly and conceptualize, creating logical structures that explain his or her physical experiences.
  • Final form- the person no longer requiresconcrete objects to make rational judgmentsHis or her ability for abstract thinking is very similar to an adultReferences:-Anonymous. Piaget’s Key Ideas. from learningandteaching.info Website: http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/piaget.htm -Wadsworth, Barry J. (1996). Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive and Affective Development: Foundations of Constructivism, Fifth Edition. New York: Longman Publishers. Anonymous. Stage Theory of Cognitive Development. from learning-theories.com Website: http://www.learning-theories.com/piagets-stage-theory-of-cognitive-development.html -Flavell, John H. (1993). Cognitive Development. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc.
  • The Four Stages:The Sensorimotor Stage (Birth to 2 years old)The Preoperational Stage (ages 2 to 4)The Concrete Operational/Operations Stage (ages 7 to 11) The Formal Operational/Operations Stage (ages 11 to 15)
  • Learning is an active process: Direct experience, making errors, and looking for solutions are vital for the assimilation and accommodation of information. How information is presented is important. When information is introduced as an aid to problem solving, it functions as a tool rather than an isolated arbitrary fact.
  • Piaget helps us to understand that meaning is constructed as children interact in meaningful ways with the world around them. Thus, That means less emphasis on isolated "skill" exercises that try to teach something like long division or end of sentence punctuation. Students still learn these things in Piagetian classrooms, but they are more likely to learn them if they are engaged in meaningful activities (such as operating a class "store" or "bank" or writing and editing a class newspaper). Whole activities-authentic activities which are inherently interesting and meaningful to the studentIsolated-grade on a test or a "Great, you did well" from the computer lesson softwareReferences:http://viking.coe.uh.edu/~ichen/ebook/et-it/cognitiv.htm
  • Dj Nicole Jean Piaget

    1. 1. J<br />ean<br />Piaget<br />
    2. 2. BACKGROUND<br />JEAN PIAGET<br />
    3. 3. Jean Piaget<br />Father of PSYCHOLOGY<br />Began at age 11 -paper on albino sparrow<br />Wrote 60 books and over 100 articles<br />His last 60 years - research on mental development.<br />Brought forth the theory of how intelligence works<br />
    4. 4. Jean Piaget<br />Thought of as a child psychologist and educator <br />Prefers to be called genetic epistemologist<br />Contributed in field of computer science and AI; were used to develop LOGO<br />Most important contribution: Theory of Cognitive Development<br />
    5. 5. &quot;The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” <br />– Jean Piaget<br />
    6. 6. Theory of cognitive development<br />JEAN PIAGET<br />
    7. 7. Theory of Cognitive Development<br />humans cannot be &quot;given&quot; information; must “construct” own knowledge<br />Build knowledge through EXPERIENCE<br />Schema - mental models<br /> - made sophisticated through assimilation and accommodation<br />
    8. 8. FOUR STAGES<br />JEAN PIAGET<br />
    9. 9. The Sensorimotor Stage (Birth to 2 years old)<br />behavior is primarily sensory and motor<br />recognizes self as agent of action and begins to act intentionally<br />achieves object permanence<br />
    10. 10. 6 Periods<br />
    11. 11. 6 Periods<br />
    12. 12. The Preoperational Stage (ages 2 to 4)<br /><ul><li>need of concrete physical situations
    13. 13. objects classified in simple ways especially by important features.
    14. 14. thinking is still egocentric</li></li></ul><li>The Concrete Operational Stage (ages 7 to 11)<br /><ul><li>As physical experience accumulates, accommodation is increased
    15. 15. Can think logically about objects and events 
    16. 16. Achieves conservation of number (age 6), mass (age 7), and weight (age 9) 
    17. 17. Classifies objects according to several features such as size.</li></li></ul><li>The Formal Operational Stage <br />(ages 11 to 15) <br /><ul><li>Cognition reaches its final form
    18. 18. capable of deductive and hypothetical reasoning
    19. 19. Can think logically about abstract propositions and test hypotheses systematically. 
    20. 20. Becomes concerned with the hypothetical, the future, and ideological problems.</li></li></ul><li>Key Piagetian principles<br />JEAN PIAGET<br />
    21. 21. Learning is an<br />active<br />process<br />
    22. 22. Learning is an active process<br />How is information presented?<br />
    23. 23. Learning should be<br />whole,<br />authentic<br />and “real”<br />
    24. 24. Learning should be whole, authentic, and &quot;real&quot;<br />How is meaning constructed?<br />
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