Interactivity in Exhibits
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Interactivity in Exhibits

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Interactivity in Exhibits Interactivity in Exhibits Presentation Transcript

  • Interactivity in Exhibits Some Thoughts on Doing Them Well
  • About Me…
    • Working in museums for 18 years or so
    • Started out in Evaluation/Audience Research
    • Moved on to exhibit planning and development and project management
    • Design firms and museums
  • About Me…
    • At the end of January, I had spent 4+ years at the Boston Children’s Museum
    • Groundbreaker in development of hands-on interactivity in museums
  • About Me…
    • As of 1 February – Waterloo Region Museum
    • West of Toronto
    • New, $ 25 million museum + exhibits, with interactive components
  • Some Myths
    • They’re only for kids, not adults
    • Only useful in children's’ museums and science centres
    • Can’t coexist with artifacts
    • Just push buttons
    • Just computer kiosks
    • Just mechanical
    • Always break
    • Cost too much
    • You can convey the same information with text
    • You can explain any complex or abstract concept with them
  • This Is Not an Interactive…
  • PISEC – A Way to Look at Them
    • 1998 study of family friendly exhibits
    • Conducted by Minda Borun
    • Included:
      • Franklin Institute
      • New Jersey State Aquarium
      • Philadelphia Zoo
      • Academy of Natural Sciences
    • 7 characteristics of family friendly exhibits
  • 1. Multi-Sided
    • Family can cluster around exhibit
  • Brookfield Zoo
  • V & A
  • 2. Multi-User
    • Interaction allows for several sets of hands or bodies
      • Tied to multi-sided
  • V & A
  • KidStage
  • Peep’s World
  • The Common
  • Game On!
  • 3. Accessible
    • Comfortably used by children and adults
  • Making America’s Music
  • Making America’s Music
  • The Common
  • History is All Around Us
  • 4. Multi-Outcome
    • Observation and interactions are sufficiently complex to foster group discussion
      • Not always appropriate in a non-science setting
      • “Open-ended” might be a better term
  • Raceways at BCM
  • Raceways at BCM
  • Children of Hangzhou
  • The Common
  • 5. Multi-modal
    • Appeals to different learning styles and levels of knowledge
      • This is really very difficult in a single exhibit element
      • Best achieved by using various techniques throughout an exhibit
  • 6. Readable
    • Text is arranged in easily understood segments
  • Peep’s World
  • Peep’s World
  • The Common
  • The Common
  • Children of Hangzhou
  • Peep’s World
  • 7. Relevant
    • Provides cognitive links to visitors’ existing knowledge and experience
      • Best achieved using Front-End evaluation
      • Confirmed using Prototyping
  • Prototyping
  • Prototyping
  • Some Other Thoughts/Examples
  • Costumes
  • Computers for Keepsakes
  • Photo Ops
  • Integrated with Artifacts
  • Integrated with Artifacts
  • Integrated with Artifacts - Touch
  • Integrated with Artifacts - Touch
  • Integrated with Artifacts - Touch
  • Feedback Incorporated in Exhibit
  • Royal Museum of Scotland
  • Thank You!
    • James Jensen
    • Curator of Exhibits
    • Waterloo Region Museum
    • [email_address]