Deep dive network requirementsfor enterprise video conferencing

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  • 1. Network Requirements for Enterprise Video Conferencing Moderator: John Bartlett NetForecast, Inc. john@netforecast.com Blog: www.nojitter.com
  • 2. Voice/Video Network Issues Network cleanup Security Mauricio Sanchez, HP Bandwidth LAN QoS William Choe - Cisco WAN QoS Seamus Hourihan – Acme Packets Bandwidth Management Test tools Matt Sherrod – CA/NetQoS ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 2
  • 3. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 3
  • 4. VoIP & Video Deployment Realities VoIP & Video are not just another application Real-time traffic is different Expectations of reliability and quality are high VoIP & Video are difficult to scale Need to understand bandwidth requirements Need careful and complete QoS deployment Need new monitoring methods QoS must extend over the entire path Wireless, LAN, WAN Quality of Experience – QoE Measuring above the network layer Understanding and measuring the experience of the user ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. Slide 4
  • 5. Real-Time Traffic is Different! Data Traffic 10 9 Bursty bandwidth profile 8 Utilization (Mbps) 7 6 5 Resilient to loss (TCP/IP) 4 3 2 1 Graceful degradation when 0 0 200 400 Seconds 600 800 1000 there is bandwidth contention Real-Time Traffic 500 Flat, constant bandwidth profile Thousands 450 400 350 Not loss resilient (UDP/IP) Bandwidth (Kbps) 300 250 200 Degrades rapidly when there is 150 100 50 0 0 50 100 150 Seconds 200 250 300 350 bandwidth contention 5 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved.
  • 6. Data and Voice Interference Add QoS QoS gives priority to the real-time traffic This holds down the peaks of the data packets, and prevents packet loss and jitter in the real-time streams This is a critical first step to delivering high quality voice and video streams ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. Slide 6
  • 7. Manage BW with Application Real-time traffic requires dedicated bandwidth Requires bandwidth for duration of the call (voice or video) If bandwidth becomes constrained, quality suffers Design the network for the predicted demand Allocate BW for expected concurrent calls Configure QoS in routers to support it Manage the bandwidth to stay within design Application has to implement call admission control This is quite different than how we manage bandwidth for data applications ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 7
  • 8. Quality & Reliability Expectations The PSTN always works We expect dial-tone an connectivity Voice is our emergency service lifeline We are visual beings, we notice visual faults Telepresence is used by top executives There is a high expectation for the availability and quality of voice & video applications We have to ensure all the underlying infrastructure will support the required service delivery ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 8
  • 9. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 9
  • 10. Implementation Errors Simple network implementation errors cause constant packet loss in the network TCP overcomes these problems easily Packet retry mechanism Application slows down slightly Voice & Video use UDP Problems appear as poor voice or video quality We usually blame the application first Clean up the network ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 10
  • 11. Clean up the Network Half/Full Duplex Problem This is everywhere! Half! Noisy Copper Conn. (T1, T3) Long Ethernet cables Cat 3 Ethernet cables Full! Bad fiber splices Look for layer 2 error reports on the switch Collision, CRC, runts, etc. Check duplex negotiated on switch and on the endpoint ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 11
  • 12. Clean up the Network Overloaded routers (CPU utilization) ACLs Debug mode QoS carried by CPU (slow path) MLPPP Out of order packets Paired access links (e.g. NxT1) CEF does not guarantee packet order Use path-based test tools to find these problems Active or passive path-based tools will find implementation errors Use an operational tool to constantly monitor the network Monitor 7x24, database results Implement ongoing quality work to remove errors ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. Slide 12
  • 13. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 13
  • 14. UC&C Security: Network as a Keystone Mauricio Sanchez Chief Security Architect April, 2010 © 2008 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 15. UC becomes a network app… …And in doing so exposes its soft underbelly Old Approach New Approach • Offered physical security – • UC apps exposed to TCP/IP security risks on data networks only commonality is at the physical level • DoS, Eavesdropping (VOMIT), Spoofing, VoIP 15
  • 16. Voice and Video Collaboration Requires more intelligence in wiring closets RADI US VLAN, QoS ? Multi-service applications creates new challenges 1. How to securely authenticate multiple devices on a port ? 2. How to easily deploy device configuration ? 3. How to proactively monitor and deliver a reliable network ? 4. How to demonstrate regulatory compliance ? Convergence requires more intelligence and control at the edge where users and devices connect 16
  • 17. What organizations need today 1. Leverage capabilities in the network • More security with less complexity 2. Enable network access control • Mitigate fraud & DoS attacks, by allowing only trusted clients onto the network 3. Protect the entire wired & wireless network, not just a few strategic points • Unified secure wire & wireless management 4. Provide automated network response to security attacks • Assure uninterrupted real-time services 17
  • 18. Multimedia Security Requirements Layer 2 Hardening • Secure management access (SSHv2, SSL, SNMPv3, TACACS+, etc) • Prevent man-in-the-middle attacks (ARP inspection, IP lockdown, DHCP) Network Access Control (NAC / NAP) • Multi-User, Multi-Role Access Control (802.1X, Web-auth, MAC-auth) • Port-based policy based on centrally deployed NAC / RADIUS QoS & Bandwidth Limits • Flexible QoS policy engine, with ability to remark 802.1p/DSCP for trust • Guaranteed minimums, maximum bandwidth to limit problem clients Layer 3 • Granular, flexible Access Control List (ACL) policy engine at full wire speed • Best-in-breed threat management solutions distributed within the network Network Resiliency • Leverage built-in DoS prevention features to limit effect of attacks • Monitoring technologies, such as sFlow, for broad security visibility 18
  • 19. VoIP Security Summary Business Needs Security Solution Maximize availability • Use multi-layer security approach to protect the entire network Regulatory compliance • Log and report network access … Users, phones, dates/times, usage Investment protection • Use best-in-breed solutions based on open industry standards Affordability • Leverage security within network devices, to minimize costs 19
  • 20. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 20
  • 21. Bandwidth, Resolution and FPS Voice over IP (VoIP) Typical relationship of bandwidth, BW resolution and fps shown in this table G.729 85 Kbps G.711 35 Kbps Higher compute Video Bandwidth Requirements power allows Transport BW Resolution Frame Rate better resolution 128 Kbps CIF 15 fps and fps for the 384 Kbps CIF 30 fps same bandwidth 512 Kbps 4CIF 15 fps+ Choose the right 768 Kbps 4CIF 30 fps mix for your 1 Mbps HD720 15 fps+ enterprise 2 Mbps HD720 30 fps applications 4 Mbps HD720 60 fps 6 Mbps HD1080 30 fps ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 21
  • 22. Bandwidth Calculation Determine Video and Data traffic for each location Size WAN access link Ensure QoS is properly configured Verify with testing tools ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 22
  • 23. Locating the MCU The MCU is a bandwidth hotspot All simultaneous bridged endpoints connect to the bridge concurrently Hosted MCU at a service provider means a high bandwidth link to that provider Owned bridge in Data Center demands enterprise WAN BW Co-location for bridge puts it in the right place for large distributed video ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 23
  • 24. Multiple WAN Providers Try to avoid this model Adds complexity to QoS deployment Creates a bottleneck at connection point Does not scale well with future video conferencing deployments ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 24
  • 25. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 25
  • 26. Cisco slides 26 26
  • 27. Networking Requirements for Video William Choe Director, Product Management Ethernet Switching Technology Group williamc@cisco.com © 2010 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. 27
  • 28. Enterprise Video Network Trends Video has doubled from 2 years ago and expected to double again a year from now Companies are likely to say they will spend more on video conferencing, Telepresence, and digital security cameras Expected spending on video applications in the next year Median percent of total network traffic that is video 100 90 Will spend 30 more 80 Will spend 25 70 about the 60 same 20 Will spend 50 less 15 Will not spend 40 10 30 Don't know 20 5 10 0 Two years Last year Current Expected in Expected in 0 ago one year two years e ng video e eras all nc enci ag oc se g ign cam ick t re fer in tal s ty cl lep con tream igi ecu ri at/ Source: Cisco Business video study — December, 2009 Te eo op s D s ch Vid skt git al eo De Di Vid 28
  • 29. Business Video Increasing demands on the network Streaming Digital Media Telepresence Bandwidth Bandwidth 5 0 50 4 0 40 3 0 30 2 0 Concurrent Sessions Latency,Loss,Jitter 20 1 0 Concurrent Sessions Latency,Loss,Jitter 10 0 0 Dynamic Sessions Multicast Dynamic Sessions Multicast Digital Signage TelePresence Video on Demand Conferencing IP Video Surveillance Desktop Collaboration Bandwidth Bandwidth 50 50 40 40 30 30 20 20 Concurrent Sessions Latency,Loss,Jitter Concurrent Sessions Latency,Loss,Jitter 10 10 0 0 Dynamic Sessions Multicast Dynamic Sessions Multicast Collaboration IP Video Surveillance CCTV WebCam 29
  • 30. Enterprise Video Services Medianet Architecture webex Cisco Video & Voice Applications • End-to-End Medianet Service Interface APIs Architecture Enable Rich Optimize User Media Experience • Intelligent Solutions Multicast NetFlow Media Monitoring endpoints/apps Media Aware Routing RSVP integrated with the intelligent SAF IPSLA network Content virtualization PfR QoS Media Optimization • Any device, anywhere • Optimized Seamless Security experience 30
  • 31. Cisco Catalyst QoS Model QoS is overlooked/challenged with Gig/10G Networks Stack Egress Policer Marker Ring Queues Ingress Policer Marker Queues Traffic Classify SRR SRR Policer Marker Policer Marker Ingress Egress Ingress Queue/ Egress Queue/ Schedule Schedule Classification Policing Marking Congestion Congestion Control Control • Inspect • Act on • Ensure • SRR (vs WRR) or shaped policer • Two queues/port incoming conformance to servicing decision • One queue is packets based a specified rate • Egress queue shaping • Reclass or configurable for on ACLs or on an • Egress port rate limiting drop strict priority policy aggregate or out-of-policy servicing individual flow SRR Benefits: packets • WTD for basis Balanced traffic flow to congestion control prevent high priority queues (three thresholds impacting low priority queues per queue) • SRR to service queues 31
  • 32. Network Traffic vs. Network Capacity Network Traffic Network Capacity Overprovisioning Congestion Control Admission Control Adjust network capacity Adapt elastic traffic flows Reject traffic flows that to accommodate peak to their share of network exceed network capacity traffic capacity or violate policy 32
  • 33. Cisco’s CAC Solution Policy and Differentiation by Media Type by Call Type + User Type Direction Call Room Voice Video Internal Center Trader Desktop System Telepresence Voice Voice Voice Video Video Video 33
  • 34. Service Advertisement Framework (SAF) Simplifying Service Routing with “Call Control Discovery” Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Configuration Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent complexity, IP Network Speed of IP Network Call Agent G K GK Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent deployment Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent High Toda Call Agent Call AgentCall Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call AgentCall Agent Call Agent operational y ith W costs, TCO Call Agent Call Agent Call Agent Call agents discover each other SAF Call Agent Availability, through the SAF network by: Consume Advertise Call Agent Call Agent Business Advertising their call control service SAF-enabled Call Agent Continuity Requesting call control services Call Agent IP Network Call agents dynamically route calls to Call Agent Call Agent remote destinations based on received Call Agent advertisements Call Agent Call AgentCall Agent 34
  • 35. Packet Loss & Video Impairment Test 50/500 ms network outage causes 500/1000 ms impairment Video streams impacted 2-10X longer than network outages 35
  • 36. HA Design Considerations L2/L3 rapid convergence, RSTP and nonstop forwarding, for network disruptions Resilience via Cross-stack EtherChannel to mitigate switch failover 36
  • 37. Medianet: Making the Video Experience Resource Reservation and Prioritization, QoS, Context-Aware Poor Collaboration Experience High Quality, Real-Time Video High Business Travel Cost Collaboration, Sports Blocked CEO M&A CEO M&A Meetin NegotiatioSports Meetin NegotiatioSports g n Event g n Event Global Business, WW Offices Introducing: Medianet on Catalyst switching and ISR portfolio 37
  • 38. 38
  • 39. Cisco Slides 39 39
  • 40. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 40
  • 41. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 52
  • 42. Manage BW with Application Real-time traffic requires dedicated bandwidth Requires bandwidth for duration of the call (voice or video) If bandwidth becomes constrained, quality suffers Design the network for the predicted demand Allocate BW for expected concurrent calls Configure QoS in routers to support it Manage the bandwidth to stay within design Application has to implement call admission control This is quite different than how we manage bandwidth for data applications ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved.
  • 43. Bandwidth Management QoS queues will be set to support video with high priority up to a specified bandwidth per link Once the bandwidth limit is reached, the network starts to drop video packets We have to manage the amount of high priority traffic in our networks to insure QoS will work as planned Bandwidth management is done by the gatekeeper or comm. manager, via Call Admission Control (CAC) Communications Manager ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 54
  • 44. Configure the BW Manager BW Mgr must know network topology Typically statically configured BW Mgr must know BW limits for each link Match router configurations Information now stored in two locations Create a process to insure info stays synchronized ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved.
  • 45. Real-Time BW Pools Bandwidth Manager only knows the applications it supports Video Gatekeeper knows video Call manager knows voice Streaming manager knows streaming Typically no coordination between applications Need to allocate separate bandwidth pools to each application Voice BW Video BW Streaming BW Someday we will have a common BW manager (see work Avistar is doing with IBM) ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved.
  • 46. Agenda Section Time Problem statement 2:00 Cleanup 2:15 Security 2:20 Bandwidth 2:40 QoS in LAN 2:50 QoS in WAN 3:10 BW Management 3:30 Test Tools 3:45 Q&A 4:00 ©2010, NetForecast, all rights reserved. 57
  • 47. Network Requirements for Video Conferencing Tool Time for Network Mechanics Steven Guthrie Sr. Principal, Product Marketing steven.guthrie@ca.com
  • 48. Agenda > Why We Need to Thinking Differently Today Video Conferencing Outside the Common Domains – Event/Fault/Incident/Problem Management – Performance Management – Customer Experience (Application) Management – Workload Automation > Three Areas Critical for Video Conferencing Success Quality of Experience Bandwidth Management QoS Management > Merging of Path Visibility and Network Telemetry Path Management 59 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 49. Most Infrastructure Tools Don’t Cover Video SAP BACK PSFT END PACER USER NETWORK FRONT END Mainframe CICS MIDDLE WARE April 22, 2010 WAN/ WWW Router Firewall Switch Load Web Portal App Server Database Balancer Servers End User Web Services Databases Other Apps Infrastructure Performance Application Management Management Performance Management 60 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 50. Specialty Domains for Managing Video 1. Quality of Experience Management 3. QoS Management 2. Bandwidth Analysis 61 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 51. Quality of Experience Management > Active Measurement > Passive Measurement Synthetic tests between Endpoint/phone makes agents, routers and the best probe switches See end-to-end picture, For example, Cisco IP last mile SLA technology Agent based approaches 62 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 52. Monitor the User Experience > Synthetic/Active Tests IP SLA tests – Simulated UC packets from router to router; great for trouble shooting problems – Typically requires management platform to consume and analyze data – Large scale deployments typically use ‘shadow routers’ to offload the load primary routers – Not universally known/deployed Agent-based tests – Proactively sends simulated voice traffic and calculates MOS – In addition to agent, typically requires management platform to consume and analyze data 63 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 53. Effectively Monitor the User Experience, Cont. > Actual traffic Stats from endpoints or management server – Collect real time delay, loss and jitter stats as reported by the endpoints – Poll management server post-session – Calculate MOS (in real time or post-session) – Requires specialty management platform to consume and analyze data 64 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 54. Analyze Bandwidth Usage > Measure bandwidth usage Call Setup/Signaling, Presence Voice, Video, Conference, IM > NetFlow, sFlow, jFlow provide this info and more NetFlow data from routers and switches provides bandwidth analysis capability for UC applications 65 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 55. Network Traffic Flow Analysis • Flow Data • NetFlow • sFlow • jFlow • IPFIX • Class of Service • CBQoS • NBAR • RMON 66 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 56. Long-Term Packet Capture • TiVo® for your network - storage units up to 288 TB • Stream reconstruction - audio and video replay 67 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 57. Is This the Real Definition of QoS? > In the field of telephony, quality of service was defined in the ITU standard X.902 as "A set of quality requirements on the collective behavior of one or more objects". Quality of Service comprises requirements on all the aspects of a connection, such as service response time, loss, signal-to-noise ratio, cross-talk, echo, interrupts, frequency response, loudness levels, and so on. > Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_of_service > Emphasis added 68 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 58. Or Is It “Classification” > In the field of computer networking and other packet- switched telecommunication networks, the traffic engineering term quality of service (QOS), refers to resource reservation control mechanisms rather than the achieved service quality. > Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_of_service > Emphasis added 69 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 59. Or Is It Everything that Makes Up the “Service”? DNS, web LAN Core Infrastructure servers, etc Data Center MPLS IP Backbone Voice & Net Management 1. Voice/Video System 2. Wire, wall jack, etc. 3. Switching core 4. Layer 3 core Gateway 5. Services 6. Voice comm/msg Unified Communication & 7. Multimedia apps Messaging Systems PSTN 8. IP WAN 9. Network/trunks 70 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 60. Managing QoS from Policy Perspective > Traffic classification and prioritization for reliable VoIP Time-consuming to configure & troubleshoot Needs to be monitored for queuing, shaping & drops > Auto Discover and model QoS classes, policies and behaviors > Real time monitoring of traffic classes / Router > Alarm condition hierarchy (critical/major/minor) 71 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 61. Managing Video Service as a Business Service Service Console - Administration Service Dashboards 72 72 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 62. Merging Path Management with Network Telemetry 73
  • 63. Path and Path Latency 74 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 64. Path and Path Latency 75 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 65. Location Drill to Path With Device and Application Performance 76 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 66. Path and Path Latency 77 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 67. Path and Path Latency 78 Copyright © 2010 CA. All rights reserved.
  • 68. Thank You
  • 69. Questions and Answers John Bartlett NetForecast, Inc. john@netforecast.com Blog: www.nojitter.com