AYSO Regional Referee Course

  • 4,170 views
Uploaded on

Complete course for AYSO Regional Referee and Safe Haven - used in Area 11L

Complete course for AYSO Regional Referee and Safe Haven - used in Area 11L

More in: Sports
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
4,170
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
93
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Slide automatically updates pictures of children participating in AYSO.“The American Youth Soccer Organization was established in Torrance, California in 1964 with just nine teams and the dream to bring soccer to American children. Today, AYSO has more than 500,000 players in nearly 1,000 Regions across the country and each of those children has a right to a safe, fun, fair and positive environment for experiencing the benefits of sports.AYSO designed the Safe Haven program and the course you are about to take to fulfill this promise to our children.”
  • “Through the foresight of our founding fathers, AYSO uniquely envisions creating programs “that enrich children’s lives” – a theme you should see throughout all our coaching, officiating and management courses and in our policies, procedures and guidelines.”
  • The Philosophy of AYSO is to educate and develop young people by encouraging their interest and participation in soccer through its “Everyone Plays”, “Balanced Teams”, “Open Registration”, “Positive Coaching’”, “Good Sportsmanship” and “Player Development” concepts. “AYSO’s core philosophies, are unique among youth sports programs today. Each of the core philosophies is key to the content and structure of the AYSO soccer experience. We ask that everyone embrace these philosophies when dealing with our children.”
  • “We’re a soccer organization and our goal is for kids to play soccer so we mandate that every player on every team play at least half of every game. And when we say ‘Everyone Plays’ everyone plays”…
  • “Including our Very Important Players. Our VIP program offers players with disabilities the opportunity to experience teamwork and the joy of being outside with their families cheering them on.”
  • “Because it is more fun and fair when teams of equal ability play, we form new teams each year as evenly as possible.”
  • “There are no try-outs which exclude anyone from playing AYSO. Our program is open to all children between the ages of 4 and 19 who want to register and play soccer…. Interest and enthusiasm are the only criteria for playing AYSO. During registration, players may be asked to run through drills for the purpose of evaluating their skill levels. This is done so that player skills can be evenly distributed across all the teams to fulfill our second philosophy of Balanced Teams.”
  • “We believe that encouragement of player effort provides for greater enjoyment by the players and ultimately leads to better-skilled and better motivated players. Positive Coaching and Age and Developmentally appropriate training are the focus of AYSO’s coaching program. The Coaching program is one of the few programs to be fully accredited by NCACE – The National Council for Accreditation of Coaching Education.”
  • “Who does Good Sportsmanship apply to? It applies to everyone… and AYSO instills Good Sportsmanship in every facet of our programs because we want to create an environment based mutual respect rather than a win-at-all costs attitude.”
  • “Our newest philosophy approved by our executive members at the 2009 National Annual General Meeting - NAGM, is designed to enable greater enjoyment of the game by emphasizing programs that will allow players to develop to the best of their ability and desire.”
  • AYSO’s EXTRA programs allow for more competitive play opportunities the AYSO way by embracing the AYSO philosophies. AYSO Soccer camps offer AYSO and Safe Haven trained coaches.
  • Everyone should be encouraged to volunteer; More volunteers help balance the workload across more hands and bring more diversity and strength to the program; Our programs are open to anyone willing to complete an application, register and consent to background checking; We offer the same positive coaching & encouragement to anyone willing to volunteer;Everyone must be a good sport to make the program successful; andAYSO provides training programs for all the key job functions in order to maximize the volunteer experience.
  • The answer is C) Professional Coaching – AYSO’s philosophy is Positive Coaching.
  • Regional Commissioner and Safety Directors can provide Incident Report forms – also available under Resources on www.ayso.org. Give the report to your Safety Director or Regional Commissioner.

Transcript

  • 1. Regional Referee Training
  • 2. Introduction There are more than 500,000 children playing AYSO soccer and each one of those children has a right to a safe, fun, fair and positive environment for experiencing the benefits of youth sports.
  • 3. Why AYSO? The Vision of AYSO is to provide world class youth soccer programs that enrich children’s lives.
  • 4. What makes AYSO unique? The philosophy of the organization is to educate and develop young people by encouraging their interest and participation in soccer through our six philosophies:
  • 5. Everyone Plays® Our goal is for kids to play soccer – so we mandate that every player on every team must play at least half of every game.
  • 6. Everyone Plays® This includes our VIP -Very Important Players
  • 7. Balanced Teams Each year we form new teams as evenly as possible – because it is fair and more fun when teams of equal ability play.
  • 8. Open Registration Our program is open to all children between 4 and 19 years of age who want to register and play soccer. Interest and enthusiasm are the only criteria for playing.
  • 9. Positive Coaching OSITIVE NSTRUCTIONAL P I E NCOURAGING Encouragement of player effort provides for greater enjoyment by the players and ultimately leads to better-skilled and better-motivated players.
  • 10. Good Sportsmanship • We strive to create a safe, fair, fun and positive environment based on mutual respect, rather than a win-at-all-costs attitude, and our program is designed to instill good sportsmanship in every facet of AYSO.
  • 11. Good Sportsmanship AYSO’s Kids Zone program is one of the first of its kind to promote good sportsmanship and appropriate sideline behavior. Every AYSO venue is a Kids Zone!
  • 12. Player Development We believe that all players should be able to develop their soccer skills and knowledge to the best of their abilities, both individually and as a member of a team, in order to maximize their enjoyment of the game.
  • 13. Player Development AYSO provides a number of programs that support player development including EXTRA and AYSO Soccer Camps.
  • 14. Volunteer Philosophies? AYSO’s philosophies apply to volunteers too!
  • 15. AYSO Philosophies Mnemonic G O B E Positive Player
  • 16. AYSO Philosophies Mnemonic Good sportsmanship Open Registration Balanced Teams Everyone Plays Positive Coaching Player Development
  • 17. AYSO Team KIDS COACHES
  • 18. AYSO Team Team Rules – Work Together – Help Each Other – Protect Each Other – Do Our Best
  • 19. Every AYSO Venue is a Kids Zone! Kids Zone guidelines encourage appropriate sideline behavior – key to promoting a fun, safe, familyfriendly environment. Parents and Spectators pledge to respect the tenets of Kids Zone. Coaches, Referees, Parents and Players abide by a Code of Conduct.
  • 20. Kids Zone Sidelines Spectators agree to respect the following rules: – – – – – – – – – – Kids are # 1 Fun, not winning is everything Fans only cheer, only coaches coach No yelling in anger Respect the volunteer referees No swearing No alcohol, tobacco products or other controlled substances No weapons Leave no trash behind Set a proper example of Good Sportsmanship
  • 21. Quiz Which of the following is NOT one of the core AYSO philosophies? a) b) c) d) e) Balanced Teams Open Registration Professional Coaching Everyone Plays Player Development
  • 22. Regional Referee Course
  • 23. Objectives • • • • Know what to expect from U-10 players Know the parts of the field Know the number of players in each age group Recognize ball in and out of play
  • 24. Objectives • Successfully manage pre-game duties • Know how to start, when to stop, and how to restart play. • Understand method of scoring • Basic understanding of Fouls, Misconduct and Free Kicks.
  • 25. Objectives • Understand basics of Offside • Use appropriate signals • Manage post-game situations
  • 26. History of the Game Soccer is known as Football outside the USA Tribal lore had battle victors kicking body parts around Earliest “organized” game was called Calcio, played by the Romans.
  • 27. History of the Game The modern game dates from 1863 when the Laws of the Game were established at a London pub Two factions split from one another. One was Rugby. The other was Football (soccer)
  • 28. History of the Game FIFA (Federation International de Football Association) governs the worldwide game USSF (United States Soccer Federation) is the national governing body AYSO is a National Association member of USSF
  • 29. History of the Game The Laws of the Game can be summarized in three simple words: Safe Fair Fun
  • 30. Philosophy of Refereeing The Laws of the Game are intended to provide that games should be played with as little interference as possible, and in this view it is the duty of the referee to penalize only deliberate breaches of the Law. Constant whistling for trifling and doubtful breaches produces bad feelings and loss of temper on the part of the players and spoils the pleasure of spectators.
  • 31. Philosophy of Refereeing • Younger Games: More a friendly guide than policeman. • Give younger players a second chance. • No public humiliation.
  • 32. Understanding Younger Players
  • 33. U-6 Players Physical Characteristics • Early stages of development • Can run, jump and skip, but motor skills are still developing • Lots of energy, but in bursts. • Can still tire easily • Can’t sit still long
  • 34. U-6 Players Social/Emotional Characteristics • • • • • Craves praise and attention Fearful of unknowns Needs encouragement Rapid and unpredictable mood changes Disposition to telling tall tales
  • 35. U-6 Players Thought/Cognitive Characteristics • • • • Lacks judgment regarding own safety/abilities Does not think logically Asks lots of questions Fond of stories
  • 36. U-8 Players Physical Characteristics • • • • • Plays hard and works at playing hard Sense of timing is developing Eye-hand coordination has improved Agility / endurance much better than U-6 U-8 can now balance on one foot
  • 37. U-8 Players Social/Emotional Characteristics • • • • • • Starting to define likes and dislikes Friendship is important “Play” needs a purpose Afraid of failure Need for honesty training Starting to compare self to others
  • 38. U-8 Players Social/Emotional Characteristics • • • • • • Self-esteem and self concept a big issue Becoming more outgoing Peer acceptance is very important Quick to tattle Cooperative with adults Interested in belonging to group
  • 39. U-8 Players Thought/Cognitive Characteristics • • • • • • • Beginning to understand moral rules of behavior Can solve some problems Starting to grasp the Team concept Understands the viewpoint of others Needs concrete reinforcement Treats every little mistake as a major crime Rigidly interprets ideas of justice and fair play
  • 40. U-10 Players Physical Characteristics • • • • More interested in competitive activities More interested in improving skills Attention span is increasing May accept a physical touch, but some will begin to reject it
  • 41. U-10 Players Social/Emotional Characteristics • • • • Group acceptance is important Wants to be liked Feelings are easily hurt May blame others to explain their own mistakes Needs reinforcement
  • 42. U-10 Players Thought/Cognitive Characteristics • Can recall details with accuracy • Can understand the concept of cause and effect • Enjoys attention but their reaction to praise may be more subdued • Still takes what is said quite literally
  • 43. Understanding Younger Players Implications for how we officiate these games Referees never touch a child
  • 44. Dealing with Coaches/Spectators AYSO Team concept to enlist cooperation • • Remain calm and professional Maintain control of your emotions Intervene early to prevent escalation • A smile, wink or look can defuse a bad situation Keep adults focused on creating an enjoyable experience for the players
  • 45. Law 1 – The Field
  • 46. The Field of Play Penalty Area Goal Area Halfway Line Corner Flag Halfway Flag Center Mark Goal Goal Line Penalty Arc Penalty Mark Corner Arc Center Circle Touch Line
  • 47. Pre-Game Duties and Activities • • • • • • Arrive Early Check Field and Equipment Introduce Yourself to the Coaches Check Players Equipment Brief Assistant Referees Conduct Coin Toss
  • 48. Pre-Game Duties and Activities Arrive Early • At least 30 minutes prior to game time – (45 minutes if first game of the day) • In proper uniform
  • 49. Pre-Game Duties and Activities Arrive Early With Required Equipment
  • 50. Pre-Game Duties and Activities Check Field and Equipment • • • • • • Markings Holes, glass, rocks, debris, etc. Goals (properly secured) Nets (secured, no holes/gaps) Corner flags Ball
  • 51. Pre-Game Duties and Activities Introduce Yourself to the Coaches • Learn their names and write them down • Be Approachable not Flippant, Cold or Arrogant
  • 52. Pre-Game Duties and Activities Check Players Equipment • Team Uniform – Shirt, Shorts, Socks, Shin guards, Shoes • Shin guards must be under the socks • Goalkeeper’s shirt must be distinguishable from all other players and the referee
  • 53. Pre-Game Duties and Activities Check Players Equipment • Nothing dangerous (in your opinion) – No jewelry, watches, earrings – No casts or splints (even if padded) • Knee braces are okay, but only if padded and safe to all players (in your opinion) • Medical alert bracelets secured with tape. The information must remain visible
  • 54. Pre-Game Duties and Activities 123 U10 Blue Angels Blue/White Jane Doe John Doe 3 5 9 11 13 15 I I Julie Foudy Tiffeny Milbrett Cindy Parlow Abby Wambach Kristine Lilly Michelle Akers 5/21/06 1-1 3-2 ABC X X X X I 12:15 X X West N/A Blue Angels Red Devils
  • 55. Pre-Game Duties and Activities Brief Assistant Referees • Neutral AR’s: – Work as a Team – Follow Standard Signals – Discuss Non-Standard Signals • Club Linesmen (Non-Neutral Individual) – Put at Ease – Explain Expectations • Only call in/out of play • Raise flag straight up when ball has gone completely over the line.
  • 56. Post-Game Duties • Collect the game ball and return to owner. • Supervise team handshake • Complete lineup card and misconduct report (if any) • Congratulate referee team and seek feedback
  • 57. Check For Learning During the safety inspection of the players, the referee notices that a player is wearing earrings. She explains that she had her ears pierced the previous day and if she removes the earrings the holes will close. What should the referee do? The referee should explain to the player that earrings are not permitted; if she wishes to play, she must remove them. The referee may choose to involve the coach.
  • 58. Check For Learning In a U-8 game, the ball offered by the home team is a size 4 but otherwise acceptable. What should the referee do? Point out to the team that provided the ball that it is the wrong size and ask for a size 3 ball. If the team cannot provide one, ask the other team for one. If no size 3 ball is available, play the match with a size 4 ball.
  • 59. Check For Learning During the field inspection, the referee notices that a goal is being held in place by two bricks placed on the back of the structure. What should the referee do? Bricks resting on the goal structure are not sufficient to anchor it securely. The referee should inform the coaches that the goals need to be securely anchored before the match can start.
  • 60. Check For Learning The goalkeeper must wear a jersey that is ____ ? Different from the referee and all other players It is not necessary to check the field prior to the start of the match if it is the last game of the day. (True/False) False
  • 61. Check For Learning A club linesman may indicate whether a corner kick can be awarded or not. (True/False) False Club linesmen can only indicate when the ball has gone over the touchline or the goal line (not a goal) Knee braces may be worn by a player. (True/False) True But only if padded and if it is safe for all players, in the opinion of the referee.
  • 62. Now that we’ve finished our pre-game activities.... How do we start the game?
  • 63. Starting the Game Conduct the Coin Toss • Have players Greet Each Other • Away team calls it • Winner of the coin toss chooses which goal to attack • The other team takes the kick-off
  • 64. Starting the Game Kick-Off • Verify the correct number of players on the field (no visible or audible counting). • Minimum of Seven (7) players on each team for full-sided regulation games. – U8 Minimum is Five (5)
  • 65. Defenders must be 10 yds from the ball All players must be on their own side A A D D A A D D D A A A D A D D
  • 66. Starting the Game Kick-Off • The ball is stationary in the center of the field. • Referee blows whistle to start play. • Ball is in play when kicked and moves forward. – This is when the timer starts
  • 67. Keeping Time • Time starts when the ball has been put into play (kicked and moves forward). • The match consists of two equal periods. • Time is added for excessive time lost due to substitutions, time wasting or unusual delays. • The amount of time lost (if any) is determined by the referee.
  • 68. Check for Learning The team that wins the coin toss chooses ____ ? Which goal to attack Where should the players be on a kick-off? Each team should be in its own half of the field. The team that is not taking the kick-off must be outside the center circle.
  • 69. Stopping the Game There are seven reasons to stop play: 1. Ball goes out of play 2. The referee deems it necessary 3. Goal is scored 4. Foul is committed 5. Injury 6. Substitution 7. Halftime / End of Game
  • 70. The lines of the field are part of the area they define: In Play In Play IN OUT In Play Either in the air or on the ground Out of Play
  • 71. The ball’s position determines whether it is in or out of play Not the player’s position
  • 72. Play is stopped when the Referee deems it necessary Sometimes there are outside influences that make it necessary to stop play.
  • 73. Play is stopped when a Goal is Scored When the ball crosses wholly over the goal line, between the goalposts and beneath the crossbar. It does not matter which team put it there.
  • 74. Play is stopped when a Foul is committed This is something that is unfair or unsafe.
  • 75. Play is stopped for Injuries ANYTIME IMMEDIATELY In younger players’ games it’s better to err on the side of caution
  • 76. Play is stopped for Injuries • Blood on clothing must be neutralized • Blood on the body must be removed • This is the coach’s responsibility
  • 77. Play is stopped for Substitutions There are four opportunities for substitutions: • Approx. midway through the first half • Halftime • Approx. midway through the second half • Injury – Coach May Substitute the Player or Play Short until the Player can return
  • 78. Play is stopped at the end of the first half and at the end of the game
  • 79. Check for Learning When can the referee stop play for an injury? Anytime / Immediately A player dribbling the ball steps over the line. The ball is out of play. (True/False) False It’s the position of the ball (not the player) that determines whether the ball is in play or not.
  • 80. Checking for Learning Is this ball IN or OUT of play? OUT IN IN Play
  • 81. Checking for Learning How many substitution opportunities are there in a regulation match? Four Name Them Approx. midway through the first half Halftime Approx. midway through the second half Injury
  • 82. Checking for Learning A player is injured and leaves the field (with the referee’s permission). What are the coach’s substitution options? 1. The team can play short until the player returns to the field (with the referee’s permission) 2. A substitute can replace the injured player.
  • 83. Checking for Learning A player is injured and leaves the field (with the referee’s permission). The coach decides to substitute the injured player. Which player gets credit for the “quarter”? The player that started the “quarter”.
  • 84. Checking for Learning If the boundary line of the field is a rut in the grass and the ball gets caught in the rut as it rolls, is it in play? Yes The lines are a part of the area they define. The ball remains in play until the entire ball crosses the entire line.
  • 85. Checking for Learning According to the National Rules and Regulations, what is the minimum amount of time each team member must play? Half the game (two “quarters”)
  • 86. Break
  • 87. Fouls and Misconduct OBJECTIVES • Explain the two categories of fouls • Cover fouls that occur in younger players’ games • Introduce the concept of Misconduct
  • 88. A Foul is an unsafe or unfair act • • • • Committed by a player Against an opponent On the field of play While the ball is in play All four elements must exist for the incident to be a foul.
  • 89. Fouls and Misconduct Fouls are categorized into two types: • Direct Free Kick fouls (DFK) • Indirect Free Kick fouls (IFK) These categories are named for the way play is restarted
  • 90. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) There are 10 DFK Fouls: 7 “CREX” fouls – Careless, Reckless, or used Excessive Force 3 others – The offense is always a foul
  • 91. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 1. Strikes an opponent 2. Kicks an opponent 3. Trips an opponent Even the attempt to commit any of these three actions is a foul.
  • 92. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 1. Striking or attempting to strike an opponent
  • 93. Striking or attempting to strike an opponent 93
  • 94. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 2. Kicking or attempting to kick an opponent Foul tackle from behind - may be kicking or tripping (From behind is most likely at least “Dangerous Play”)
  • 95. Kicking or attempting to kick an opponent “Over the ball” tackle - may be kicking and serious foul play
  • 96. Kicking or attempting to kick an opponent
  • 97. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 3. Tripping or attempting to trip an opponent
  • 98. Tripping or attempting to trip an opponent
  • 99. These are NOT Tripping
  • 100. Foul Recognition Why do tripping and kicking happen?
  • 101. Because players are trying to tackle the ball Tackling is when a player takes the ball away from an opponent by use of his feet or lower leg. They must contact the ball first. (Not to be confused with a “tackle” in American Football.)
  • 102. Fair Tackles Slide Tackles
  • 103. Fair Tackles Tackler makes contact with ball first, player trips over ball or legs near ground Not a Foul!
  • 104. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 4. Tackles an opponent A common example of an unfair tackle would be making contact with the opponent before touching the ball Foul tackle from behind - may be kicking or tripping (From behind is most likely at least “Dangerous Play”. More on that and Tackles in a moment.)
  • 105. Tackles an opponent
  • 106. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 5. Jumps at an opponent
  • 107. Jumps at (into) an opponent
  • 108. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 6. Charging an opponent
  • 109. Charging an opponent
  • 110. Fair Charge: Shoulder to shoulder, playing the ball and without excessive force
  • 111. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) 7. Pushing an opponent
  • 112. Pushing an opponent
  • 113. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) The 7 “CREX” Fouls • 3 with the feet – – – Kicks or attempts to kick Trips or attempts to trip Tackles an opponent • 2 with hand / arm – – Strikes or attempts to strike Pushes • 2 with the body – – Charges Jumps at
  • 114. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) The Other 3 (Always a Foul) 8. Holds an opponent
  • 115. Holds an opponent
  • 116. Holds an opponent
  • 117. Holds an opponent
  • 118. Holding Foul?
  • 119. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) The Other 3 (Always a Foul) 9. Spits at an opponent Spitting at anyone is a Sendoff
  • 120. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) The Other 3 (Always a Foul) 10. Deliberately Handling the ball
  • 121. Deliberately Handling the ball • One Rule of Thumb is Be sure that the arm strikes the ball, not the ball strikes the arm. • Allow players to protect their faces. • “Hand” runs the full length of the arm.
  • 122. Deliberately Handling the ball
  • 123. Unintentional contact not a foul Did ball hit arm? Or Did arm hit ball?
  • 124. Direct Free Kick Fouls (DFK) Six of these fouls most commonly occur in U-10 and younger age groups: • • • • • • Kicks an opponent Trips an opponent Pushes an opponent Holds an opponent Unfairly Charges an opponent Handles the ball deliberately
  • 125. Indirect Free Kick Fouls (IFK) There are 7 IFK Fouls The first four pertain solely to the goalkeeper in their own penalty area
  • 126. Indirect Free Kick Fouls (IFK) 1. Takes more than six seconds while controlling the ball with their hands, before releasing it from their possession
  • 127. Indirect Free Kick Fouls (IFK) 2. Touches the ball again with their hands after it has been released from their possession and has not touched any other player.
  • 128. Indirect Free Kick Fouls (IFK) 3. Touches the ball with their hands after it has been deliberately kicked to them by a team-mate.
  • 129. Indirect Free Kick Fouls (IFK) 4. Touches the ball with their hands after he has received it directly from a throw-in taken by a teammate.
  • 130. Indirect Free Kick Fouls (IFK) 5. Plays in a dangerous manner 6. Impedes the progress of an opponent 7. Prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his hands
  • 131. Dangerous Play • High kick near opponent’s head • Heading a low ball about to be kicked • Playing ball on ground if opponent in danger • Action that endangers Goalkeeper Teammate Doesn’t Count!
  • 132. Dangerous Play
  • 133. Dangerous Play
  • 134. Dangerous Play 134
  • 135. Dangerous Play
  • 136. Impeding the process of an opponent (not playing the ball, but playing the player)
  • 137. Impeding the process of an opponent
  • 138. NOT Impeding (Within Playing Distance of the Ball)
  • 139. Indirect Free Kick Fouls (IFK) Two that most commonly occur in U-10 and younger age groups: • Plays in a dangerous manner Be Prompt with this call • Goalkeeper takes more than six seconds to put the ball into play Don’t be to “ticky-tacky” with this call
  • 140. Misconduct Behavior that is in serious conflict with the spirit of the game and good sportsmanship (Something that’s very rare in the U-10 games) Two types of Misconduct: Those resulting in a Caution Those resulting in a Send-Off
  • 141. Misconduct There are seven cautionable offenses: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Persistently infringes Laws of the Game Unsporting behavior Dissent by word or action Delays the restart of play Enters or re-enters the field of play without permission 6. Leaves the field of play without permission 7. Fails to respect the required Distance on a corner kick, free kick or throw-in
  • 142. Misconduct There are seven send-off offenses: 1. Serious foul play 2. Abusive/offensive/insulting language or gestures 3. Violent conduct 4. Spits at any person 5. Receives 2nd caution in the same match 6. Denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity by deliberately handling ball 7. Denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity by an offense punishable by a free kick or penalty kick
  • 143. Misconduct is rare in U10 Games Referees should deal with it informally without showing cards.
  • 144. Coaches and spectators can be warned and even dismissed from the game. But they must never be shown the red or yellow card.
  • 145. Check for Learning There are two types of fouls, name them. Direct Free Kick Fouls Indirect Free Kick Fouls Why are the fouls given these names? They are named for the way play is restarted after the referee has stopped play because of the foul
  • 146. Check for Learning What are the six Direct Free Kick Fouls most often seen in U10 games? Kicking an opponent Tripping an opponent Pushing an opponent Holding an opponent Unfairly Charging an Opponent Handling the ball deliberately
  • 147. Check for Learning What are the two Indirect Free Kick Fouls most often seen in U10 games? Dangerous Play Goalkeeper takes more than six seconds to put the ball into play
  • 148. Check for Learning What type of foul is Handling the ball deliberately? Direct Free Kick Foul What type of foul is Pushing an Opponent? Direct Free Kick Foul
  • 149. Check for Learning What type of foul is Playing in a dangerous manner? Indirect Free Kick Foul If a player tries to hit an opponent, but misses, the referee cannot call a foul – True or False? False – Even the attempt to strike an opponent can be a foul
  • 150. Check for Learning The ball bounces up and hits a player in the arm, is this a foul? No A player that is lying on the ground kicks at the ball, no one else is nearby. Is this Dangerous Play? No
  • 151. Check for Learning The referee thinks a foul may have occurred, but he is not sure. Should he stop play? No A U10 player is guilty of Misconduct. They should be shown the yellow or red card, True or False? The referee has the authority to show the card, but should work together with the coach to resolve the issue without showing a card.
  • 152. Check for Learning A Coach is behaving badly and the Referee decides to dismiss the coach from the field. If the coach’s conduct is very bad, the Referee may show the coach the Red card, True or False? False Cards are solely for the players Coaches / Spectators are never to be shown the cards.
  • 153. Lunch
  • 154. Restarting the Game For some reason, the game has been stopped. (Injury, goal, foul, ball out of play, etc.) How do we restart play?
  • 155. Restarting the Game THROW-IN When the ball passes out of play over a touch line, play is restarted with a Throw-in The throw is taken by the opponents of the team that last touched the ball. The throw is taken from the approximate point on the line where the ball left the field.
  • 156. Restarting the Game THROW-IN At the moment of delivering the ball, the thrower must: •Face the field of play; •Have part of each foot touching the ground either on or behind the line; and •Use both hands to deliver the ball from behind and over the head.
  • 157. Restarting the Game THROW-IN •The ball is in play as soon as released and any portion of it is on or over the outside edge of the touchline. •Opposing players must be at least 2 yds. from the point of the throw-in. •A goal may not be scored directly from a throw-in.
  • 158. Restarting the Game GOAL KICK When the whole ball passes over the goal line, last touched by an attacker (not a goal), play is restarted with a Goal Kick for the defending team. The ball is placed anywhere in the goal area.
  • 159. GOAL KICK All of these balls are legally placed within the goal area.
  • 160. Restarting the Game GOAL KICK The ball is in play when it leaves the penalty area into the field of play. The kicker cannot touch the ball a second time until it’s touched by any other player. A goal can be scored directly from a goal kick, but only against the opposing team.
  • 161. Restarting the Game CORNER KICK When the whole ball passes over the goal line, last touched by a defender (not a goal), play is restarted with a Corner Kick for the attacking team. The ball is placed anywhere within the corner arc area.
  • 162. Restarting the Game CORNER KICK All of these balls are legally placed
  • 163. CORNER KICK Players from the opposing team must be 10 yds. from the ball. The ball is in play when it is kicked (with a kicking motion) and moves. It does not have to leave the corner arc area. The kicker may not move the corner flag. A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick.
  • 164. Restarting the Game FREE KICKS A way to restart play when the Referee has stopped play because of a foul. There are two types of free kicks: Direct Free Kick Indirect Free Kick
  • 165. Restarting the Game Direct Free Kick (DFK) A DFK is awarded when the Referee has stopped play for a Penal or DFK Foul A goal may be scored directly from the kick (against the opposing team)
  • 166. Restarting the Game Indirect Free Kick (IFK) An IFK is awarded when the Referee has stopped play for Offside, Non-Penal or IFK Fouls, or for Misconduct on the field not involving a Foul The ball must touch any other player before a goal may be scored
  • 167. Restarting the Game To signal an Indirect Free Kick, the Referee holds his hand straight up into the air. The hand remains in this position until the ball either (a) touches any other player, or (b) goes out of play. Other than direction, there is no signal for a Direct Free Kick
  • 168. Restarting the Game The kicker may not touch the ball a second time until it has touched another Exception: If a free kick taken by the player. defending team in its own penalty area is touched a second time before the ball leaves the penalty area, the kick is retaken.
  • 169. In most cases a Free Kick is: Taken from the location of the foul, and In play once it is kicked (with a kicking motion) and moves. All opponents must be 10 yds. from the ball. But there are some exceptions. Basic Referee Course - Lesson 7 170
  • 170. If a free kick of any type is awarded to the defending team in its own goal area, the ball may be placed anywhere in the goal area The ball is in play once it leaves the Penalty Area Direction of Kick
  • 171. If an IFK is awarded to the attacking team in its opponent’s goal area, the ball is moved out to the goal area line. The ball is in play once it is kicked and moves Direction of Kick
  • 172. If a Direct Free Kick Foul is awarded to the attacking team in the opponent’s penalty area, a penalty kick is awarded instead. The ball is in play when it is kicked and moves forward. Direction of Kick
  • 173. PENALTY KICK (U-10 and above, only) •A penalty kick is awarded when a direct free kick foul has been committed by a team within its own penalty area. •All players (other than the kicker and the goalkeeper) must be: -Outside the penalty area and penalty arc -Behind the ball -On the field of play Until the ball is played.
  • 174. PENALTY KICK (U-10 and above, only) •The goalkeeper must remain on the goal line until the ball is in play (may move side-to-side) •The ball is in play once it is kicked and moves forward. •Kicker may not touch the ball a second time until touched by any other player.
  • 175. Restarting the Game DROPPED BALL A way to restart play for an unusual but neutral reason. Injury Dog on the field Stray ball
  • 176. DROPPED BALL The referee drops the ball where it was when play was stopped. The ball is dropped from the players’ waist height. The ball is in play when it hits the ground. If a player kicks the ball before it hits the ground, the ball is dropped again.
  • 177. Checking for Learning The ball goes completely over the touch line, last touched by an attacker. What is the restart? Throw-in for the defending team The ball goes completely over the goal line (not a goal), last touched by a defender. What is the restart? Corner Kick
  • 178. Checking for Learning Is this ball legally placed for a corner kick? Yes
  • 179. Checking for Learning What does this signal indicate? Indirect Free Kick
  • 180. Checking for Learning How many players must be present for the taking of a dropped ball? There is no requirement The ball goes completely over the goal line (not a goal), last touched by an attacker. What is the restart? Goal Kick
  • 181. OFFSIDE Why do we need an Offside Law?
  • 182. OFFSIDE The Offside Law is the only law that restricts tactical positioning during dynamic play. The offside law is intended to ensure that players earn the right to shoot on goal.
  • 183. OFFSIDE Elements of the offside infraction: 1. Position 2. Time of Judgment 3. Active Involvement All three elements must be present or there cannot be an infraction
  • 184. OFFSIDE Offside Position A Player is in an offside position if he is: 1. In the opponents’ half of the field; 2. Closer to the opponents’ goal line than the second to last defender; and 3. Closer to the opponents’ goal line than the ball All three elements must be present or the player is not in an offside position, and there cannot be an infraction
  • 185. Offside Position It is not an offense for a player to be in an Offside Position. BUT His involvement in play may be restricted if a team-mate touches or plays the ball
  • 186. OFFSIDE Time of Judgment Offside Position is judged at the moment the ball touches or is played by a team-mate
  • 187. OFFSIDE Active Involvement A player may be involved in active play by: 1. Interfering with play (playing the ball); 2. Interfering with an opponent; or 3. Gaining an advantage by being in that position.
  • 188. OFFSIDE Once all three of these conditions have been met: POSITION TIME OF JUDGMENT ACTIVE INVOLVEMENT An offside infraction has occurred An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team from the place the infringement occurred.
  • 189. OFFSIDE Exceptions There is no offense if a player receives the ball directly from: Goal Kick Corner Kick Throw-In
  • 190. Direction of attack AR OFFSIDE A1 A2 D A D A
  • 191. Direction of attack AR NOT OFFSIDE D A2 A A1 D A
  • 192. Direction of attack AR NOT OFFSIDE D A A2 A1 D A A A3
  • 193. Direction of attack AR A2 A1 A NOT OFFSIDE D Goal Kick A D
  • 194. Direction of attack AR OFFSIDE A D D A Deflection off goalpost or goalkeeper
  • 195. Direction of attack AR NOT OFFSIDE D D A A
  • 196. Direction of attack AR OFFSIDE A A D D
  • 197. Direction of attack AR OFFSIDE A D D A
  • 198. Direction of attack AR OFFSIDE D A A D D
  • 199. Direction of attack AR NOT OFFSIDE D A D A D
  • 200. Direction of attack AR Corner Kick A A D D D OFFSIDE
  • 201. Key Takeaways It is not an offense to be in an offside position Wait for Active Involvement before penalizing for offside The player is not required to touch the ball for the offside to be penalized
  • 202. Break Pickup a flag and move outside
  • 203. Referee and Assistant Referee Mechanics
  • 204. What are the Duties of the Referee ? 1. 2. 3. 4. Keep a record of the match a. Timekeeper b. Scorekeeper c. Control substitutions d. File a written report Stop play for injury Restart play when it has been stopped Suspend/terminate a match for cause
  • 205. REFEREE COMMUNICATION / SIGNALS Whistle Voice Hand
  • 206. AYSO Incident Report An Incident Report is required whenever there is a serious incident involving AYSO participants, activities, facilities, or property including: • • • • • • • Injuries Threats of bodily harm Fighting Property damage Hospitalizations Law Enforcement Lawsuits
  • 207. Referee Positioning • 10-15 yards from play • Keep play between referee and A/R • Stay out of passing lanes
  • 208. REFEREE POSITIONING Direction of Play A D D R A D AR
  • 209. REFEREE POSITIONING AR D Direction of Play A R D D A AR
  • 210. ASSISTANT REFEREE DUTIES AND SIGNALS Neutral Assistant Referee: •Indicate ball out of play •Indicate which side gets throw-in, goal kick or corner kick •Indicate when offside offense has occurred •Indicate when substitution is desired •Assist the referee to control the game
  • 211. ASSISTANT REFEREE DUTIES AND SIGNALS FLAG SIGNALS: •Throw-in •Goal Kick •Corner Kick •Offside •Foul •Goal •Other
  • 212. ASSISTANT REFEREE DUTIES AND SIGNALS Club Linesmen Only indicate ball in-and-out of play
  • 213. Key Takeaway The Referee’s role is to ensure the game is Safe, Fair and Fun
  • 214. Assistant Referee Key Takeaways Assistant Referees assist the Referee They indicate when they see an issue, Referee makes the call Priority One: Watch for Offside
  • 215. Check for Learning What method of communication by the Referee is most effective at saying to the players: “Stop playing, I saw a foul”? The Whistle What is the Assistant Referee’s Signal for a throwin awarded to the attacking team? Facing the field of play and raises the flag 45 degrees above the diagonal in his right hand, parallel to the touch line
  • 216. Check for Learning Who determines when the half is over? The Referee Who calls offside? The Referee
  • 217. FUNDAMENTAL COACHING CONCEPTS
  • 218. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: DEFENDERS:
  • 219. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: SCORE DEFENDERS:
  • 220. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: SCORE DEFENDERS: STOP SCORING
  • 221. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: SCORE ADVANCE DEFENDERS: STOP SCORING
  • 222. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: SCORE ADVANCE DEFENDERS: STOP SCORING DELAY
  • 223. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: SCORE ADVANCE MAINTAIN POSSESSION DEFENDERS: STOP SCORING DELAY
  • 224. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: SCORE ADVANCE MAINTAIN POSSESSION DEFENDERS: STOP SCORING DELAY REGAIN POSSESSION
  • 225. OBJECTIVES OF THE GAME ATTACKERS: SCORE ADVANCE MAINTAIN POSSESSION DEFENDERS: STOP SCORING DELAY REGAIN POSSESSION
  • 226. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: DEFENDERS:
  • 227. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEFENDERS:
  • 228. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEFENDERS: DELAY
  • 229. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH DEFENDERS: DELAY
  • 230. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH
  • 231. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH MOBILITY DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH
  • 232. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH MOBILITY DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH BALANCE
  • 233. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH MOBILITY WIDTH DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH BALANCE
  • 234. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH MOBILITY WIDTH DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH BALANCE CONCENTRATION
  • 235. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH MOBILITY WIDTH CREATIVITY DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH BALANCE CONCENTRATION
  • 236. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH MOBILITY WIDTH CREATIVITY DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH BALANCE CONCENTRATION COMPOSURE
  • 237. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKERS: PENETRATION DEPTH MOBILITY WIDTH CREATIVITY DEFENDERS: DELAY DEPTH BALANCE CONCENTRATION COMPOSURE
  • 238. In AYSO, It’s about more than the game !
  • 239. Continuing Education • Web sites – AYSO 1455 • www.laderasoccer.com – AYSO Area 11-L: • www.ayso11L.org – AYSO: • www.soccer.org • www.aysohelp.org – USSF: • www.ussoccer.com – FIFA: • www.fifa.com • Publications – AYSO: • Laws of the Game • Guidance for Referees and Coaches – USSF: • Advice to Referees on the Laws of the Game – FIFA: • Questions and Answers to the Laws of the Game