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Energy Policies of IEA Countries Ireland 2012 Review - IEA Executive Director

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  • 1. Energy Policies of IEA CountriesIreland 2012 ReviewGovernment Buildings, Merrion Street, Dublin11 July 2012Maria van der HoevenExecutive DirectorInternational Energy Agency © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 2. Review background IEA conducts regular reviews every 5 to 6 years The review took place in November 2010 Based on the IEA’s Shared Goals and three pillars  Energy security  Economic growth  Environmental sustainability Peer review by experts from other IEA member countries, the European Commission (EC), and the IEA Secretariat © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 3. Notable changes since the last review Significant reforms have continued, despite the economic downturn  Electricity and natural gas markets  Renewable energy  Energy efficiency and climate change © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 4. Primary Energy Supply is hydrocarbon-based Fossil fuels = 95%  Oil is 48% TPES, remains Mtoe 16 largest energy source 14  Coal (9%) and peat (6%) 12 declining; still sizeable 10  Gas growing, now 33% TPES 8 6 Push for renewables 4  Huge wind potential 2 0  Biomass small; developing 1973 1978 1983 1988 1993 1998 2003 2008 Oil Natural gas Peat Coal Biofuels and waste Wind  R&D in ocean energy Not in energy mix  Solar and hydro limited  No nuclear allowed © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 5. Decarbonising electricity generation Renewables policy emphasis – 40% generation by 2020  Favourable REFITs extended 35 TWh  Wind =10%; 30% 2020 target 30  New REFITs for 2nd gen. biomass 25 20 Gas is the dominant fuel 15  Now accounts for 62% of power 10  Will grow in tandem with growth in 5 variable renewables 0 1973 1976 1979 1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 Oil Natural gas Peat Coal Hydro Biofuels and waste Wind Coal and peat are declining  Carbon tax disincentive  Peat subsidies phased out © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 6. Decarbonising with demand-side measures Very proactive energy efficiency policy  National target of 20% savings in 2020 (compared to 1990)  Public sector to be exemplary, with a target of 30% savings  Detailed NEEAP outlines 90 measures across all sectors of the economy Energy R&D into low-carbon technologies  Public funds quintupled from 2005 and 2008; maintained despite crisis  Strong engagement with ICT companies  World leader for smart grid development  Encouragement of electric vehicles  Deployment of smart meters  Strong potential for ocean energy in the future © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 7. Importance of infrastructure projects Electricity Map of gas pipelines  East-West interconnector to GB  Grid25 for wind integration  Extra North-South line needed Gas  Possible Shannon LNG project  Corrib field still not producing  Gas storage is needed NIMBY problems  Local community concerns  Consenting process important © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 8. Addressing energy security concerns Electricity production increasingly based on renewables  Gas to provide power when the wind generation is not available  500 MW East-West interconnector to Great Britain in 2012 Importance of reliable gas supplies  93% of gas supply comes through one entry point, Moffat  Poor geology for gas storage to meet peak demand  Efforts to diversify gas supply – Corrib, Shannon LNG Future of the sole oil refinery is uncertain  75 mb/d Whitegate refinery could close after 2016  …but the North-West Europe product market is abundant and diversified  And Ireland is increasing its domestic stockholding levels © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 9. Deepening regional integration Push for all-island market with Northern Ireland  Electricity: SEM has been successfully implemented  Gas: CAG seeking to emulate success of SEM Integrating with UK and EU markets  500 MW East-West interconnector to Great Britain  Affected by ongoing UK electricity market reform?  Implications of EU target models for gas and electricity? Regulator’s oversight and empowerment is key © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 10. Key recommendations (1/2)The government of Ireland should Support diversification and flexibility of gas supply Enhance the consultation, planning and consenting process for infrastructure projects Maintain funding for new low-carbon technologies, such as wind, biomass, ocean and smart grids © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 11. Key recommendations (2/2)The government of Ireland should Ensure that participation in regional energy markets brings benefits to Irish consumers and investors Ensure that regulator’s powers are sufficient © OECD/IEA 2012
  • 12. Implementing our recommendations will help Ireland to Improve its energy security, at a time of heightened risks Create new jobs in the new entrants to the electricity and gas sectors Limit the need for energy use and make the economy more energy-efficient Help the country become a 21st century low-carbon economy © OECD/IEA 2012

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