FUKUSHIMA and WORLD ENERGY
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FUKUSHIMA and WORLD ENERGY

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FUKUSHIMA and WORLD ENERGY FUKUSHIMA and WORLD ENERGY Presentation Transcript

  • Memorial Eventfor the Great East Japan Earthquake Paris; 14/03/2012 Ambassador Richard H. JonesFUKUSHIMA and WORLD ENERGY © OECD/IEA 2012
  • Will Fukushima dampen therecent nuclear renaissance? Nuclear reactor construction starts, 1951-2011 Three Mile Island Fukushima Daiichi First oil shock Chernobyl 40 400 GW Number of reactors 35 350 30 300 25 250 20 200 15 150 10 100 5 50 0 0 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 OECD Non-OECD Total capacity (right axis) © OECD/IEA 2012
  • Second thoughts on nuclear would havefar-reaching consequences “Low Nuclear Case” examines impact of nuclear component of future energy supply being cut in half Gives a boost to renewables, but increases import bills, reduces diversity & makes it harder to combat climate change By 2035, compared with the New Policies Scenario:  coal demand increases by twice Australia’s steam coal exports  natural gas demand increases by two-thirds Russia’s natural gas net exports  power- sector CO2 emissions increase by 6.2% Biggest implications are for countries with limited energy resources that planned to rely on nuclear power © OECD/IEA 2012
  • © OECD/IEA 2012
  • © OECD/IEA 2012
  • © OECD/IEA 2012
  • Smart Communities Smart communities should be a key target for the 21st century Smart communities are achievable for new and existing projects Smart communities require a holistic approach Energy is one of the most important parts of any smart community project Involvement of residents and other stakeholders is a key parameter for the success of a smart community project © OECD/IEA 2012
  • Mayor of Minamisoma City, Katsunobu Sakurai:“Change the adversity into an economic,environmental and social opportunity.” © OECD/IEA 2012