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Issnmatrix Issnmatrix Presentation Transcript

  • ASIA SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL STUDIES SCHOOL NETWORK (ISSN) SCHOOL DESIGN MATRIX TABLE OF CONTENTS The ISSN Design and Implementation Matrix: An Overview………………………………………………………………. 1-3 Domain I: Vision, Mission, and School Culture….………………………………………………………………………… 4-8 Domain 2: Student Learning Outcomes...…………………………………………………………………………………… 9-11 Domain 3: Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction..……………………………………......………………………….… 12-26 Curriculum…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…... 12-17 Assessment ……………………………………………………………………………………………...………. 18-21 Instruction …………………………………………………………………………………………………...…... 22-26 Domain 4: School Organization and Governance ……………………………………………………………...…………… 27-34 Domain 5: Professional Learning Communities …………………………………………………………………...……….. 35-38 Domain 6: Partnerships …………………………………………………………………………………………………..…. 39-41 How to Read and Use the ISSN School Design Matrix ……………………………………………………………………… 42-44 © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools
  • The ISSN Design Implementation Rubric is intended to assist educators who are part of the Asia Society’s International Studies Schools Network throughout all phases of the development of their schools. The Matrix Implementation Rubric:  Provides a blueprint for schools in planning, designing, and opening an ISSN school  Guides implementation and supports school wide reflection and self-assessment of implementation progress  Provides data needed to plan for continued growth and development as a Professional Learning Community from inception to sustaining a process of continuous improvement; and  Provides a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of the Asia Society ISSN design principles. How to Read and Use the School Design Implementation Rubric The ISSN criteria are not repeated across each level of implementation; rather, everything identified in the BEGINNING level is subsumed in the EMERGING, PROFICIENT, and EXEMPLARY levels. The criteria are intended to be appropriate to the specific stage of development. There is some intentional repetition of criteria across domains to ensure internal coherence and consistency across the entire rubric. As you read the ISSN Design Rubric you will see that the header for each key element also include percentages which are intended as rough guidelines for the expected level of intensity or depth of implementation of specific criteria across the faculty or student body. You will also find criteria for which the percentages have no significance. The percentages are a general measurement guideline to be considered only where appropriate. There are many ways to approach engaging planning teams, faculty and community in reading and understanding the Implementation criteria. Below is one suggestion. • Select one domain to focus on for a week or the period of time between professional development sessions. Determine the most appropriate group to review the domain and participate in follow-up discussion of the school’s progress in that domain. Groupings might include grade level teams, departments, interest-alike groups, the whole school faculty, or faculty-parent committees. Convene the appropriate group and: © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 2.
  • o Skim the document as a group and discuss any areas that may need clarification for common understanding. o Assign everyone (or small teams) the task of reading the criteria again in more detail, highlighting those that they feel the school has mastered to the level of expectation and those where further work must be done. o Over the designated period of time, ask the participants to observe the work going on in the school looking for evidence that matches up with these criteria. In the column provided, note observations and cite evidence. If possible, collect the relevant data and evidence such as test scores, student or parent comments, and etc for review at the next meeting. o Ask the group to bring their notes and data to the follow-up session where discussion and reflection will occur. Consider the quality and appropriateness of the data that has been collected, and determine what additional information should be gathered. When there is adequate information available to make informed judgments, identify areas of apparent success and challenges to address. Determine next steps and timelines. o Over the course of the year the entire ISSN Rubric could be discussed in this fashion. Look for connections to other events in the school. For example, periods of testing might be a good time to make observations and gather evidence on the assessment domain of the matrix. Or discuss the Family and Community Partnerships domain as the school prepares for Parent Orientations, Back to School Night, Parent Conferences, or Career Day Events. In designing Professional Development and support for the school’s use of the ISSN Rubric, ISSN Coaches may ask principals which aspects of the rubric will be the most challenging. The process of review and backwards planning might then begin with a guaranteed success to build momentum or begin with an identified challenge to get participants engaged. The decision about where to begin should be guided by the immediate concerns of the school community, the level of expertise and experience at the school, and the local context so that the ISSN Rubric becomes a powerful support for growth and development and meeting the specific needs of each school. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 3. View slide
  • VISION, MISSION, AND SCHOOL CULTURE Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 1. The school has a clear a. Communications about the d. The school uses multiple g. The school’s international j. The school is recognized and established identity school clearly define its communications channels to mission is recognized within and throughout the community as a as an international international vision and the promote its identity as an outside the education beacon of positive intercultural studies school. implications for curriculum and international studies school. community. relations, international student learning both within and awareness, and community beyond the school day. e. Parents and students are h. Students choose the school service. attracted to the school because because of its international focus b. The school’s mission and of its unique international focus and program. k. The school is recognized as an values as well as policies and and programs. international studies school by procedures are shared with i. The school has established other such schools, international students, families and any f. Students, parents, and staff are contacts and maintains organizations, and universities. school partners. provided a multilingual relationships with other handbook in print and on-line international schools and global c. Student and parent that provides a comprehensive education programs, and with orientations are conducted prior orientation to the school’s international organizations in its to the opening of each school practices, procedures, policies community, region, nation, and year to foster understanding of and international studies focus. beyond. and inclusion in the school’s international vision and mission. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 4. View slide
  • VISION, MISSION, AND SCHOOL CULTURE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 2. Faculty, staff, students, a. School staff collaboratively d. Members of the school h. Students, faculty, and l. Faculty members and the and families who develops a unique vision and community are able to families can demonstrate that school community consistently comprise the school mission statement for the school communicate the core tenets of the school’s vision and mission use the vision, mission, and community share a that articulates its focus on the school’s vision and mission are clearly evident in school shared beliefs to guide daily college readiness and statement with the larger local policies, culture, and instruction. decisions. common vision of and international understanding. community. mission for the school i. The vision and mission are m. A system is in place to that is predicated upon b. The vision and mission e. School staff and community used as the basis of an annual ensure that the school’s mission an international focus, statement is disseminated have intentional discussions reflective school assessment and and vision statement is equity of admission, broadly, included in the school about the implications of the drive strategic planning for the periodically reevaluated. educational opportunity, and student handbook and is school’s vision and mission on school. and rigorous standards. posted throughout the school key aspects of school life and n. Essential partners such as the facility and on the school’s design and implement actions j. Students, teachers and school district, community website. that are aligned. families demonstrate a sense of agencies, out of school time and belonging and loyalty to the university partners are proactive c. School staff communicates f. A formal process is in place school community. and enthusiastic in their support the vision and mission of the to ensure the vision and mission of the school. school to the broader school is communicated with and k. Essential partners such as community including the shared by newcomers to the the school district, community members of the district and school community. agencies, out of school time and other partnerships. university partners understand g. The school seeks out and support the vision and community partners who further international mission of the international learning for school. students both within and outside of the school day. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 5.
  • VISION, MISSION, AND SCHOOL CULTURE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 3. The school has a. Communications about the e. The school uses multiple j. There is broad support in the n. The school’s rituals, routines, established a culture school, including recruitment communication channels to school community for rituals, activities and practices reflecting consistent with its materials, emphasize that the promote its values. traditions, and equitable and enhancing its inclusive mission as an international mission is for all practices that reflect and international studies culture are students. f. The school’s international enhance its inclusive institutionalized and regarded as international studies studies focus is evident in international studies culture. school traditions. school. b. The school actively recruits school-wide activities and teachers and students with through student work displayed k. The school’s mission to foster o. Systems exist that ensure that experience and interests that throughout the facility. intercultural awareness, equity, students and families have a contribute to its international and trust is demonstrated significant voice in developing mission. g. The school community has consistently in key aspects of and sustaining the school’s designed and/or adopted rituals, school life. international focus. c. The school has identified traditions, and equitable rituals, routines, activities, and practices that reflect and l. The school “thinks globally equitable practices that reflect enhance its inclusive and acts locally” through its and enhance its inclusive international studies culture. ongoing engagement with local international studies culture. and international communities. h. The students, teachers, and d. Opening day activities and families are engaged in on-going m. There are frequent and well- on-going celebrations are respectful conversations about established opportunities for the designed to clarify expectations, the school culture and ways it students, teachers, and families acknowledge student can be enhanced to support to engage in on-going respectful achievement and enhance student learning. conversations about the school international awareness. culture and ways it can be i. Opening day activities and on- enhanced to support student going celebrations are well- learning. planned and communicate expectations, acknowledge student achievement and enhance international awareness. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 6.
  • VISION, MISSION, AND SCHOOL CULTURE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 4. College and post- a. Student recruitment d. Staff members articulate i. Every student, unless severely n. College and/or post- secondary readiness is materials, hall and classroom high expectations for every disabled, is enrolled in a course secondary education attendance an expectation for all displays, and communications student’s performance and their of study that supports the rates exceed 90 percent. students. with parents all reflect a college- capacity to do rigorous work knowledge, skills, and going culture. that will prepare them for dispositions contained in the o. All graduates either attend college. ISSN Graduate Profile and that post-secondary institutions or b. Staff members have set high meets or exceeds the admission obtain employment that offer expectations for every student’s e. School wide conversations requirements of the state opportunities for further growth. performance. take place to examine practice university system. that ensures all students have p. The school community c. Communications throughout equitable support in reaching the j. Credit retrieval and course consistently demonstrates a the entire school community goal of college readiness. completion opportunities are relentless pursuit of excellence express high expectations for provided to students needing that move students equitably to student performance. f. An intervention system is in assistance in staying on track for mastery of the local and state, place to identify and address the graduation. standards; and national and needs of individual students international guidelines for whose academic performance or k. The majority of the students academic performance. behavior puts their high school identified for intervention graduation and college readiness services improve their academic q. Students, while in high goals at risk. performance to the level school, have demonstrated the required for graduation and post- capacity to do college level g. Students are provided with secondary success. work. multiple opportunities to visit college campuses and post l. Students and parents are r. School has a system in place secondary programs during their regularly apprised of scholarship to track and document the post- school tenure. opportunities, financial aid secondary education experiences information and can readily of their students. h. A system has been established obtain assistance with college for informing students and applications, FAFSA forms, etc. parents about scholarship opportunities, financial aid m. All seniors are applying for information and can readily college or post-secondary obtain assistance with college education. applications, FAFSA forms, etc. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 7.
  • VISION, MISSION, AND SCHOOL CULTURE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 5. Faculty, staff, students, a. The ISSN Graduate Profile is c. Faculty, students, parents and f. The faculty develops i. The faculty use cumulative and families understand included in the school and partners can communicate the assignments, projects, lesson data from portfolio analysis to and use the ISSN student handbook and is posted knowledge, skills, and plans, and units of study, and modify instruction based on Graduate Profile as an throughout the school facility dispositions contained in the delivers instruction that is overall student progress on the and on the school’s website. ISSN Graduate Profile. planned to support the knowledge, skills, and essential tool to plan for, knowledge, skills, and dispositions in the ISSN guide, and assess student b. The ISSN Graduate Profile is d. The faculty engages in dispositions contained in the Graduate Profile. learning and progress. shared and discussed among intentional conversations about ISSN Graduate Profile. school faculty, students, parents, how key aspects of school life, j. The ISSN Graduate Profile and partners. especially curriculum, g. The students and faculty becomes an on-going self- assessment, and instruction can assess student work using evaluation tool to monitor their help students with the rubrics that reflect the progress during and after their knowledge, skills, and knowledge, skills, and high school years. dispositions contained in the dispositions contained in the ISSN Graduate Profile. ISSN Graduate Profile. e. The school faculty h. The students collect evidence collaborates with out of school via portfolios to document their partners to support seamless progress on the knowledge, international learning during and skills, and dispositions in the beyond the school day. ISSN Graduate Profile. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 8.
  • STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 1. All students graduate a. a. The school designs learning d. The school implements f. The school’s curriculum is i. All students meet the tenets of from school with the global experiences to develop the learning experiences that well-established and the the ISSN Graduate Profile. skills, knowledge, and knowledge, skills and develop the student connections between the dispositions articulated in dispositions outlined in the competencies described in the learning experiences and the j. As part of the Graduate ISSN Graduate Profile. ISSN Graduate Profile and desired knowledge, skills and Portfolio System, all students the ISSN Graduate Profile. faculty can make the dispositions in the ISSN present and defend their b. The school develops a system connections between the Graduate Profile are well- individual portfolio in a for monitoring each student’s learning experiences and the understood by faculty, students, community exhibition in their academic and social desired knowledge, skills and and parents. senior year. development, provides dispositions in the ISSN advisement and communicates Graduate Profile. g. Students monitor their own with students, parents, and progress toward graduation in guardians to ensure each student e. The school implements a partnership with their advisor / is progressing towards achieving system for monitoring each counselor, and explore post- the tenets of the ISSN Graduate student’s academic and social secondary opportunities. Profile. development, provides advisement and communicates h. Every student graduating c. As part of the Graduate with students, parents and from an ISSN school develops a Portfolio System, students guardians to ensure each student graduation portfolio that collect and reflect on annual is progressing towards achieving demonstrates their college evidence of their work that the tenets of the ISSN Graduate readiness and global demonstrates progress on the Profile including all competence. skills, knowledge, and requirements for graduation.. dispositions in the ISSN Graduate Profile. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 9.
  • STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 2. The school implements a.. The school establishes a d. The school collects baseline h. The majority of students j. All students are meeting or an academic program in system for monitoring student data on student achievement and meets or exceeds the proficient exceeding local and state which students are progress on standards-based uses trend results to develop a level of performance on local standards; and national and consistently progressing on assessments. plan to address specific and state standards; and national international guidelines for achievement needs. and international guidelines for academic performance, and a continuum of b. The school sets up data academic performance. there is no demonstrable achievement that meets or systems that are accessible to e. Data reflect that student achievement gap between exceeds local and state faculty and allow real-time performance is comparable to i. The school has established subpopulations. standards; and national monitoring of student progress. the student performance in incentives and opportunities that and international guidelines district schools with similar encourage students to undertake for academic performance. c. The school establishes demographic profiles and the challenging academic tasks and assessment policies and school demonstrates progress in to extend their learning both procedures that support consistently increasing the level during the school day and formative assessment and of student academic beyond. diagnosis of student learning performance. challenges and instructional needs. f. Individualized Learning Plans are created for each student which provide for annual goal setting with a process for frequent monitoring and interventions as needed. g. The school disaggregates data to create a plan to address performance gaps among student subpopulations. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 10.
  • STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 3. Students attend school a. The school adopts a goal for d. Current average daily g. Students attend school in high j. Students express excitement regularly and exhibit high the average daily attendance rate attendance rate meets or exceeds numbers, meeting or exceeding and pride to be members of the levels of expected school to meet or exceed the district district average. state and federal attendance learning community. When at conduct. average. targets. school or representing the e. Current out-of-school school in the community, b. The school adopts a goal for discipline referral rates are less h. Current out-of-school students exhibit exemplary school discipline referral rates to than or equal to the district discipline referral rates are less behavior. be less than or equal to the average. than the district average. district average. k. Students self-monitor and f. Longitudinal data indicate i. Low discipline referral monitor each other to maintain a c. The school collects and increasing levels of attendance numbers allow the school to be positive school culture. analyzes data on student and decreasing levels of student considered a “safe school” under attendance rates and discipline discipline referrals at the school. state and/or federal legislative referrals, and uses this to inform These data inform policies. guidelines. school policies and procedures. 4. Once enrolled, students a. The school attrition rate, d. The school attrition rate, g. The school attrition rate, k. Once enrolled, virtually all remain at the school and including transfers and drop- including transfers and drop- including transfers and drop- students remain at the school graduate with their outs, mirrors the district outs, is less than the district outs, is significantly below the and graduate with their entering entering cohort with well- average. average. district average. cohort. articulated post-secondary b. The percentage of students e. The percentage of students h. The percentage of students l. All seniors complete a high plans. passing examinations required passing examinations required passing examinations required school course of study that for graduation meets the district for graduation exceeds the for graduation is significantly leaves all options, including average. district average. above the district average. post-secondary education, open to them. c. The school actively provides f. All students make at least one i. A substantial majority of and discusses college and college visit. students stay “on track” for m. Each student has a well- employment information with graduation, fulfilling annual articulated post-graduation plan students and parents, and has grade level expectations of that has been developed in rich information about post- academic achievement and partnership with the student, secondary opportunities posted course completion. his/her parent or guardian throughout the school. (where possible), and counselor, j. All students attend multiple advisor, or school administrator. college visits and explore other post-secondary options. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 11.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 1. The school’s curriculum a. The faculty explores the g. The school sets expectations l. Virtually all curricula are p. Curriculum is standards-based is coherent, sequenced, curricular implications of for learning that reflect their aligned with state and national and uses units that reflect and organized around local and state standards, analysis of local, state, and standards and are organized international perspectives and local and state national and international international standards. around enduring understandings understandings are guidelines, and 21st century and essential questions that interconnected across standards, globally h. The faculty begins to use a knowledge and skills. emphasize global perspectives, disciplines, when appropriate, focused enduring conceptual framework for international issues and and organized around enduring understandings, and b. The school has created an organizing standards, discipline-specific content. understandings and essential essential questions that initial map of its curriculum curriculum, and instruction questions. facilitate the acquisition reflective of state around international enduring m. Grade level teams, requirements, and begins to understandings and essential multidisciplinary teams and/or q. The globally focused of the knowledge, skills, incorporate international questions and have mapped a individual teachers infuse curriculum allows for student and dispositions of the content into each course. four to seven year sequence of globally focused enduring choice within units and courses ISSN Graduate Profile. courses that facilitates student understandings and essential when appropriate. c. The faculty identifies learning consistent with the questions in their daily lessons globally focused enduring r. Resources and materials that ISSN Graduate Profile. and units of study. understandings and support learning objectives are essential questions in each i. The faculty meets regularly to n. Each year, grade level and/or drawn from a wide variety of course. plan and develop curriculum interdisciplinary teams write international sources. that is aligned vertically in new or refine existing course d. The faculty creates a disciplines and horizontally units to strengthen the global coherent sequence of across grade levels and themes focus of the curriculum and standards-based courses and they identify appropriate deepen its connection to the that facilitates student materials, resources and out of ISSN Graduate Profile. learning of the skills, school partners to support their knowledge, and dispositions o. When appropriate, units of instruction. contained in the ISSN study integrate standards across Graduate Profile. j. Faculty is in communication disciplines and around with parents and partners about overarching enduring e. The faculty incorporates the standards, outcomes and understandings and essential local and state standards in expectations that form the basis questions. their lesson plans and for student learning. teaching. k. Grade level and/or f. Expectations for what, why, multidisciplinary teams and how students learn are collaborate on interconnected, visible in each classroom standards-based units and use and are stated in language enduring understandings and accessible to students and essential questions to emphasize parents. global perspectives, international issues, and discipline-specific content. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 12.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 2. Curriculum is a. The faculty explores and is b. The faculty, in grade c. The faculty collaborates to e. A comprehensive curriculum interconnected across familiar with opportunities level/multi-disciplinary and align courses within and across map is created that shows disciplines. to link their course(s) with discipline-alike team meetings, grade level teams and explicit interdisciplinary, other disciplines and they looks for opportunities to design disciplines, as well as with out- international experiences at each develop ways to engage curricula that authentically of-school time partners, to grade level. students in understanding, connect across disciplines and provide well-articulated synthesizing, and analyzing actively involves students in international connections and f. Each year students have these connections. understanding, synthesizing, and opportunities for multiple opportunities both analyzing the interfaces. interdisciplinary problem during school and in out-of- solving. school time to choose projects that facilitate the application and d. Student input is solicited to demonstration of make connections between interdisciplinary understanding course content and current world and problem solving. events, and to identify areas for interconnected research and study. 3. Curriculum provides a. The faculty explores b. The faculty intentionally c. The faculty, in grade e. Students participate in group students with multiple opportunities to include designs curriculum for its level/multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research opportunities to engage problem-based projects and course(s) that have a problem- discipline-alike teams, designs projects that address real in complex, problem- student investigations in the based, investigative focus. curricula that actively involve problems in their own or the curriculum and in after students in problem-based broader global community. based projects and school opportunities. investigation, research and the investigations. generation of potential solutions. f. Students initiate individual research projects that are d. Student input is solicited to supported by the faculty, school, identify relevant issues and and out-of-school time problems for study. programs, including a culminating capstone project. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 13.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 4. The school has a highly a. All students are engaged in e. Students are enrolled in i. Student oral and written l. Many students are studying effective world language the study of a world English and at least one other proficiency in world language is two languages in addition to program. language and/or English as world language course that consistently assessed, and their heritage language. a second language. builds toward a measurable level results are used to guide of language proficiency. program /instructional m. Students possess the b. One or more of the adjustments as needed. knowledge and ability to languages offered is an f. The faculty works together, observe and analyze other Asian language. and with out-of-school time j. Opportunities exist for cultures, and use cultural providers where possible, to students to use their increasing competencies for successful c. The world language faculty develop interconnected language skills and intercultural cross-cultural interactions. receives support including disciplinary units that provide knowledge in immersive adequate instructional time, cultural background for experiences beyond the world n. Students actively use their curriculum development, language study. language classes, including language proficiency and resource materials, and those provided in collaboration cultural competencies in professional development. g. A comprehensive long-range with out-of-school providers authentic language settings. plan highlights the role of world and other community partners. d. World language coursework languages in an international intentionally integrates studies curriculum and how this k. Students exhibit at least learning experiences in both plan will be enacted at the “intermediate mid” level language and culture. school. proficiency according to the ACTFL standards in both oral h. The world language program and written language readily accommodates learners communication in their selected at multiple levels of proficiency world language. including heritage language learners. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 14.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 5. Students have a wide a. The school develops a plan c. Students can enroll in at least e. Students choose from and are h. Students at each grade level range of learning to align student learning one after-school program or club enrolled in a range of after- have the opportunity to take one opportunities including across both in-school and that has an explicit international school programs or clubs with or more internationally focused electives, after-school, after school programs or focus. an explicit international focus. electives. clubs that builds and deepens extracurricular international knowledge and d. At least one internationally- f. Multiple electives are infused i. All students participate in one programs, field trips, skills. focused elective is offered to with international content and or more online courses, travel and travel to deepen students. additional electives are offered opportunities and/or dual their international b. The faculty begins to that align with school enrollment courses with an knowledge and skills. develop internationally- curriculum and instruction. explicit international focus. focused extra-curricular g. Students have access to in- programs and electives. school electives, online courses, j. Students themselves create travel and/or dual enrollment and/or lead internationally- courses with an explicit focused clubs or service-learning international focus. opportunities to deepen their cultural knowledge and language skills. 6. The school offers well- a. The faculty develops a plan d. Model U.N. is offered as an f. Model U.N. is incorporated as i. All students participate in designed international for the introduction of Model elective course and/or as an a core element of the overall Model U.N. as part of the school simulations and Model United Nations (Model UN) extracurricular opportunity school curriculum. curriculum and have the United Nations to the school. available to all students. opportunity to participate on an g. Other simulations and ongoing basis either in-class or programs in which all b. An introductory Model U.N. e. The faculty experiments with computer based activities are after-school. students participate. club is established. other forms of simulations and incorporated into the curricular computer based activities that or co-curricular program. j. Model U.N. program is c. Faculty researches and align with their curriculum. primarily student-led with identifies other forms of h. The faculty establishes targeted leadership development simulation and computer partnerships with other schools, instruction provided. based activities which align programs, or networks that are with their curriculum and using appropriate regional, k. Students actively participate in international mission. national, or international appropriate regional, national, or simulations. international simulations and host these simulations when possible. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 15.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 7. All students have a. All students will be c. AP, IB and/or other college g. Multiple pathways exist that k. Almost all students complete opportunities to earn encouraged and supported preparatory courses are provide a variety of enrollment AP, IB, or dual enrollment college credits through to take college level offered at appropriate grade options in college level courses courses and achieve a level of Advanced Placement (AP), courses. levels. for all students. performance on the assessments that qualifies them for college International Baccalaureate b. The school has a plan for d. Students enroll in AP, IB or h. Every student takes at least credit. (IB), and/or dual providing college credit college courses and are one AP, IB, and/or dual enrollment college courses. opportunities and has set an provided appropriate enrollment college course l. Where possible, schools implementation schedule supports by the school to be during their high school partner with local colleges or for the array of AP, IB successful in these courses experience. institutions to offer formal and/or dual enrollment (such as course recognition, such as an college courses it will offer, discussion/study groups, i. Most students who take an International Studies Certificate with particular emphasis on exam simulations, after- AP, IB, or dual enrollment of Mastery, to students for courses that have an school reviews, and test- courses achieve a level of completing a sequence of international dimension. taking strategies). performance that qualifies them internationally focused college for college credit. level courses. e. Students enrolled in AP, IB, or dual enrollment courses j. All faculty members who reflect the full diversity of teach AP and/or IB courses have the student population. participated in appropriate professional development and f. Faculty who teach AP are expected to do so on an on- and/or IB courses have going basis. received appropriate professional development and other required support. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 16.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 8. The school’s a. There is a school vision and c. The faculty is actively f. The advisory program is i. There is an intentional curriculum includes an support for implementing an engaged in implementing and consistently implemented, process by which students effective Advisory effective student advisory reflecting on the ongoing content effective, and coherent across have an active role in Program. program that focuses on needs of the advisory program. advisors. determining and evaluating the personal, academic, and experiences in advisory. global community voice and d. Professional development g. Advisory provides students aligns with the knowledge, that supports the with opportunities to work on j. Advisory consistently skills, and dispositions in the advisory/advocacy abilities of the skills, knowledge and provides students ISSN Graduate Profile. faculty and enhances youth dispositions in the ISSN opportunities to develop and development is provided. Graduate Profile. express themselves on b. The school schedule personal, academic, school- includes sufficient time for a e. Students value the advisory h. Student voice is demonstrated wide, and international issues. specified, regular, and experience as an opportunity for within the design and consistent student advisory personal and social implementation of the advisory time. development. program. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 17.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 9. The faculty uses multiple a. The faculty begins to c. The faculty consistently f. Backwards planning is i. Multiple forms of assessment forms of ongoing “backwards plan” instruction “backwards plans” instruction, internalized throughout the are used for all courses, and, as assessment, including (i.e., identify what students must linking it directly to the school community; learning appropriate, for diverse learning authentic and know and be able to do, and enduring understandings and goals and assessment strategies styles. which assessment strategies will essential questions that guide the are in place prior to the design performance-based yield information about student curriculum. of learning activities. j. Whenever possible, students measures that enable learning as a precursor to have a voice in determining how students to demonstrate designing instructional d. The faculty uses a wide g. A variety of assessments are they demonstrate mastery of mastery of content, activities.) variety of assessment strategies, developed and implemented to knowledge and skills. college readiness and and collaboratively reflects on enable students to demonstrate global competence. b. The faculty collectively and refines approaches to mastery in multiple ways. k. The use of ongoing, formative studies and develops an assessment. feedback is a key learning tool understanding and an initial h. The faculty and students employed by faculty. repertoire of assessment e. The faculty and students regularly use and refine rubrics strategies designed for a variety begin to use and refine rubrics or other tools aligned with the l. Data collected from different of purposes that support the or other tools aligned with the ISSN Graduate Portfolio System forms of assessment is ISSN Graduate Portfolio System ISSN Graduate Portfolio System (GPS). consistently used to guide (GPS). (GPS) to make learning and decision-making about assessment explicit for students. instruction. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 18.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 10. Fair, consistent, and a. Faculty develop a philosophy b. Faculty creates a school wide d. Faculty regularly engages in f. The school’s grading practices transparent grading of grading informed by research system of grading policies and shared inquiry on grading are systematically evaluated in policies and practices on best practices and district / practices based upon their practices, grade distributions for order to maintain consistency are developed school state guidelines, where shared philosophy on grading. individuals and groups, and and fairness as well as applicable, to document student other assessment data. adherence to best practices. wide which support progress, provide feedback to c. The grading system is student growth and students and families, offer transparent, is made clear to e. Students have opportunities to learning and inform students opportunities for students, and students can participate in the design of instructional decision- revision and redemption, and articulate how their grades are criteria used to grade their work. making and planning. inform instructional decisions. determined. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 19.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 11. As a requirement of a. The faculty identifies places c. The faculty provides explicit g. Each student develops and k. All students participate in a graduation, all students in the curriculum for the instruction to students in annually presents a cumulative public, community wide successfully complete provision of explicit instruction reflective thinking and analysis grade-level portfolio (using exhibition of their ISSN an ISSN Graduate in reflective thinking and as a precursor to the elements of the Graduate Graduate Portfolios. analysis. development of student Portfolio System) that Portfolio that portfolios. demonstrates his/her reflective l. Students, parents, and teachers demonstrates college b. The faculty plans for the thinking, growth, and the skills, effectively track the readiness and global implementation of the ISSN d. The faculty begins knowledge, and dispositions of management and assessment of competence as reflected Graduate Portfolio System implementing and the ISSN Graduate Profile. student portfolios online. in the ISSN Graduate (GPS). contextualizing the ISSN Profile. Graduate Portfolio System. h. School-based systems for the management of the portfolios e. The faculty creates scaffolded are designed and implemented. performance tasks based on the GPS rubrics and defines i. The school clearly performance expectations across communicates the value of the grade levels to progressively portfolio data in relation to other build students’ skills and performance measures. capacities. j. All seniors successfully f. The faculty collaboratively complete an ISSN Graduate rates student work using the Portfolio. GPS rubrics to develop a shared understanding of student performance levels and to establish inter-rater reliability. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 20.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 12. Each student identifies a. Discussions take place at the c. Students have opportunities to f. Prior to senior year, the i. All students participate in a an international area of school level regarding the develop skills in and to practice faculty design and implement public, community wide interest and produces a design, implementation and independent research embedded yearly projects that scaffold a exhibition and assessment of capstone project that assessment of the “capstone” in their coursework and after student’s ability to produce a their internationally-themed project process. school opportunities prior to significant and successful capstone project to demonstrate will be included in the senior year. capstone project. the knowledge, skills, and Graduate Portfolio. b. The faculty develops the dispositions in the ISSN expectations and parameters for d. Capstone projects are g. All seniors successfully Graduate Profile. capstone projects, align these initiated to develop and complete an internationally- with the ISSN Graduate demonstrate students’ expertise themed capstone project. Portfolio System, and share this in an internationally-themed information with students, authentic project. h. School-based systems for the parents, out-of-school time implementation and assessment providers, and the school e. Requirements and processes of the projects are in place. community. for the capstone project are well-specified and are included in the student handbook. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 21.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 13. The faculty uses a a. The faculty demonstrates a c. The faculty begins to address e. The faculty meets the needs h. The faculty matches variety of instructional working understanding of the needs of individual students of diverse learners by using appropriate instructional strategies to engage how students’ learn and by regularly using a variety of instructional strategies that strategies with student needs and students and meet explores the use of a variety student-centered instructional systematically and intentionally interests, and provide multiple of instructional strategies. strategies. enable students to achieve access points to rigorous their learning needs. learning objectives. standards-based content. b. The faculty begins to use d. The faculty regularly uses inquiry-based instructional inquiry –based instructional f. Across the school, project- i. The faculty uses instructional strategies, such as project- strategies such as project-based based learning and other strategies that enable students to based learning, that learning, simulations, and inquiry-based instructional demonstrate productive habits of promote active student hands-on laboratory work that strategies are consistently used mind, which include problem- engagement. focus on issues of international and guided by student needs, solving, creative and generative significance. interests, and standards to be thinking skills, the capacity to met. analyze issues of international significance from multiple g. The faculty provides perspectives and the capacity to opportunities for students to direct their own learning. learn and apply discipline- specific methods of inquiry. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 22.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 14. As part of a a. The school has developed a d. Individual learning plans are g. Individual learning plans j. Students share responsibility comprehensive plan to continuously assess developed for each student and drive instructional decisions and for developing and meeting approach to ensuring student performance and to academic performance is closely ensure appropriate interventions individual learning plan student success, the disaggregate and analyze monitored with timely as needed to facilitate learning outcomes. assessment data. intervention efforts implemented outcomes consistent with the school assists students consistently throughout the ISSN Graduate Profile. k. Implemented interventions who do not yet meet b. A variety of instructional semester, both in school and out. inside and outside the classroom standards through a strategies are designed to ensure h. Data demonstrate that result in students meeting or multi-tiered system of that all students learn the e. The school analyzes data on appropriate interventions exceeding standards. proactive supports and intended content. the effect of interventions and accelerate student learning and interventions. monitors and adjusts the increase the number of students l. There is a web of highly c. A multi-tiered system of intervention process. meeting or exceeding standards. communicative providers and interventions, including out of teachers who plan, implement, school learning opportunities, is f. Communication exists i. Regular meetings increase and assess interventions aligned designed that includes English between intervention providers, coherence among teachers and with classroom instruction and Learners and students with both in school and out of school, intervention providers working designed with the acceleration special needs, with a systematic and teachers ensuring a coherent with students. of student learning as the key plan for implementing its instructional sequence for objective. components. students. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 23.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 15. The faculty uses a. The school has developed a b. The school literacy plan has f. Instructional strategies i. The school’s approach to instructional strategies school-wide literacy plan that been fully implemented and is promoting literacy are used literacy is effective with all that promote high includes: (1) identification of annually reviewed and revised across disciplines and programs students and is demonstrated by levels of student students with literacy needs, (2) based on the data available. and result in students accessing students’ ability to articulate roles and responsibilities for more rigorous curriculum. literacy strategies and apply literacy (in both new addressing student needs, (3) c. Discipline-based literacy them in various academic and traditional communication among teachers strategies are used in classrooms g. The faculty holds itself contexts. literacies) across of all disciplines and special and help students scaffold their accountable for the literacy disciplines. program staff (both in and out of learning to meet rigorous learning of all students and j. The school’s literacy program school), and (4) attention to curriculum expectations. making literacy strategies is highly regarded as a model. discipline-based reading explicit to the students. strategies. d. Data are collected, using k. Teachers and students multiple measures, to monitor h. The data collected from the consistently use discipline-based and adjust the literacy plan. multiple measures of assessment literacy strategies to understand show improved student complex content and meet or e. Periodic meetings of faculty performance and are used to exceed standards. and special program staff take monitor and adjust the literacy place to enhance the sharing of plan. literacy strategies across disciplines and programs. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 24.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 16. Faculty and students a. An initial audit of existing d. Faculty and students have h. The school technology plan is l. Technology and new media is use technology and levels of technological and new consistent, reliable, and implemented with greater implemented seamlessly into new media to access media integration and teacher equitable access to technology fidelity and data show teachers teachers’ and students ongoing international and student competency is within and outside the are appropriately integrating learning and production of new conducted and a technology plan classroom. technology into instruction. intellectual products. resources, connect to is developed based on the audit international schools results. e. Data show an increase in i. Data show consistency in m. Students graduation and organizations, teachers’ use of technology and teachers’ use of technology and portfolios demonstrate the create new intellectual b. The school collectively new media in classroom new media in classroom effective use of technology and products, and support develops a vision of effective instruction. instruction. new media throughout. all facets of the technology integration that learning process. builds teacher and student f. Students increasingly use j. Students demonstrate the n. Students regularly engage in capacity to access international technology and new media in ability to select, analyze, collaborative learning projects resources. their development and evaluate, and use international with students from other production of learning and new resources, accessed using countries facilitated by c. There are initial efforts by knowledge. technology, to support their technology and new media. faculty and students to utilize learning. technology to access g. The faculty increasingly uses international resources to technology specifically to infuse k. Students regularly connect support student learning. the curriculum with with students and/or adults from internationally significant other countries through content both in and out of technology-based resources school. (e.g., i-EARN, Global Nomads, etc.). © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 25.
  • CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, AND INSTRUCTION (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 17. Students engage in a. A comprehensive plan for d. All students participate in at g. All students complete 120 j. Internationally-focused service learning developing and coordinating least 15 hours of service each hours of service learning for service learning opportunities experiences that community service and service year. graduation and a minimum of 40 are systematically integrated address local, regional, learning is created, with hours is internationally-focused. into the curriculum. emphasis on internationally- e. A system is in place to track national, and connected service opportunities. students’ community service h. A comprehensive system is in k. School wide partnerships are international issues and service learning placements. place to organize, monitor, and in place with local, national, and and perspectives. b. School identifies community evaluate the quality of service international organizations to and out-of-school partners to f. A system is in place to placements. support student service learning support service learning and integrate service learning into activities. help provide placements for the curriculum and to align i. Students are provided service. service learning opportunities structured opportunities to l. Students actively seek out and with curricular learning reflect on their service learning plan local, national, and c. Students participate in objectives. experiences, to integrate them international service learning community service and service into the core curriculum and activities. learning activities as assigned by portfolio, and self-select new the faculty. experiences to enhance their growth and development. 18. Students develop a. A comprehensive plan for c. The school provides a range e. Students complete 120 hours h. Students complete 120 hours international developing and coordinating of internationally-related career of an internship within or of an internationally-related knowledge and skills internationally-focused exploration experiences which outside the school day or year. internship and accompanying through substantive internships is created, including are available to all students. structured reflection activities the development of partnerships f. The majority of internships before graduation. internships and other with community and / or out-of- d. Students engage in are internationally-focused. career exploration school time partners to support internships during the summer i. School-wide partnerships are activities. and help provide internships. prior to or during their senior g. A system for tracking, in place with local, national, and year. monitoring, and evaluating international organizations for b. Students participate in career internships is in place. student internships and career exploration activities. explorations. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 26.
  • SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 1. The school is planned, a. The local governing agency b. A scale-up plan is c. The scale-up plan maximizes d. The sequenced developed, and develops or commits to a implemented to systematically the use of facilities and faculty implementation of the maintained as a small, plan to implement a small grow the school to its targeted allocations to provide a international studies school is internationally-focused international studies high capacity. personalized and internationally- complete and a plan is in place school (9-12) of no more focused learning environment. to advocate for and sustain the school. than 500 students or small organization. grades 6 – 12 middle / high school of no more than 875 students. 2. Students, representative a. A student recruitment plan d. Systems and processes are in f. As the school size increases; h. The fully implemented school of the local exists to ensure student place to ensure the school the student population continues maintains demographics that demographics and enrollment reflects represents the racial, ethnic, to be representative of the local correspond to the local achievement levels, are informed student and parent socioeconomic, gender, and demographics. community profile. decisions based on academic diversity of the local enrolled in the expressed interest in school district. g. Where imbalance exists, i. If demand for the school international studies international studies. recruitment strategies are continues to grow and exceeds school by choice. e. A lottery or other method of developed and implemented in the capacity of the school by b. School staff develops web- student selection ensures a concert with the local more than 100 percent in the based and paper enrollment diverse student body and an community to encourage a more enrolling grade level, the school materials that describe the equitable opportunity for all representative group of students will advocate with the district to international studies focus applicants to attend the school. to attend the school. develop a plan to open another of the school. international studies school. c. No students are denied entry based on previous academic performance or English language proficiency. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 27.
  • SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 3. A diverse faculty and a. A faculty and staff d. The professional training, g. The faculty reviews the ISSN i. The faculty actively recruits staff is recruited and recruitment plan exists to experiences, and interests of the Teacher Profile on a bi-yearly other teachers who have a hired. All members of ensure that certified faculty and staff reflect the basis and reflects on the skills demonstrated record of the the faculty and staff teachers and staff are drawn skills, knowledge, and that are needed in teams, skills, knowledge, and from a broad pool of dispositions in the ISSN Teacher departments, and across the dispositions present in the ISSN work at the school as a applicants within and Profile. school to define future teacher Teacher Profile. matter of choice. outside of the community. recruitment and professional e. Processes and procedures are development. b. Selection of staff is school- in place that recruit teachers based and in alignment with broadly and provide the school h. The school faculty and staff negotiated agreement with access to a diverse pool of are diverse and representative of local bargaining units. teacher candidates through the various sectors of the sources inside and outside of the broader school community. c. The school seeks to recruit districts. a diverse faculty and staff with excellent qualifications f. Structures and practices in the and international interest school support and affirm its and experience. cross-cultural composition. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 28.
  • SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 4. The school has an a. A staff member is b. A grant or locally funded c. A permanent locally funded d. A permanent locally funded international studies compensated to serve as the half-time international studies half-time international studies full-time international studies coordinator who international studies coordinator is employed to work coordinator is employed to work coordinator is employed to work facilitates the infusion of coordinator to work with with the staff, students, and the with the staff, students, and the with the staff, students, and the the staff, students, and the school community on enhancing school community on enhancing school community on enhancing international knowledge school community on the international focus of the the international focus of the the international focus of the and skills into the enhancing the international school. school. school. learning program and focus of the school. fosters partnerships to provide opportunities for student internships, enrichment learning experiences, and international travel or exchanges for students and faculty. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 29.
  • SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 5. The school is structured a. Staff and students are e. Advisors and grade level i. Faculty are expected to be m. Counselors and other to support the organized in academic academic teams are in place and accessible to students at professionals develop support development of close teams by grade level. meet regularly to discuss the specified times during the day. groups to address students’ adult-student needs of students. physical and mental health b. There is a plan for an j. Students feel comfortable issues, as needed. relationships. Advisory program and f. Administrators, counselors, initiating meaningful accompanying professional and social workers collaborate conversations with their n. Students have adults who development to assist with advisors and teams to advisors or other faculty know about and care for them faculty in addressing support student learning as well members. and can readily access them as student needs and issues. as mental and physical health. needed. k. Processes are in place to c. There is a plan for a g. Advisors serve as student systematically assess student o. There are times and spaces monitoring program to advocates with other staff, mental and physical health and for students to meet with faculty ensure additional support families, and external service to address student needs, and to to get academic assistance or when students require it. providers. establish school-wide physical address personal needs. and mental health policies and d. Administrators and staff are h. Every student feels that there practices. readily accessible to is a least one person on staff that students and parents. knows him/ her well. l. Counselors and other professionals develop support groups to address students’ physical and mental health issues, as needed. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 30.
  • SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 6. Teachers are organized a. The initial school plan c. As initial school g. Common planning time for j. Staff is involved in high- into high- performing, includes weekly common implementation proceeds, grade grade level and discipline teams performing grade level and / or instructionally- focused planning time, within the level teams have regularly is fully implemented and teams discipline teams and the teams that have common contractual day, for scheduled time for instructional are functioning effectively to majority of instructional instructional teams to focus planning, three or more times improve curriculum, assessment, planning and curriculum planning time within the on curriculum, assessment, per week. and instruction; integrate global development occurs at the team contractual day several instruction and international content and perspectives; and level. times each week. connections. d. Discipline teams have develop plans to meet individual common planning time at least or groups of students’ needs. k. Strong vertical alignment b. A plan to monitor and once a month. across teams is present. coordinate the use of common planning time is e. Team meeting time is used to h. Teams engage in a reflective developed. discuss, analyze, and develop process to enhance the use of plans to meet individual or planning time, completion of groups of students’ needs. and communication about next steps and results. f. Processes are initiated to monitor the use of time and i. Vertical planning and subject- communicate action steps. matter discussions take place within discipline teams and across grade level teams. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 31.
  • SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% a. The school has a multi- c. Structures , both d. A system of school f. There is an internal 7. Decision-making stakeholder site council permanent and ad hoc, structures works in monitoring and structures support the (e.g. Site-Based are created and take alignment to assure the feedback process that efficient functioning of Decision-Making action to address the effective and efficient assures the committee or School planning and operation of the school. effectiveness of the the school and assure Improvement Council) development needs of system and its effective involvement of based on district or the school including e. There is demonstrable components. stakeholders from the state guidelines to those that address evidence of the impact school community. assist the school in professional learning, of the school’s problem-solving and parent involvement, governing structures on decision-making. community the functioning of the engagement to support school and the b. The school leader the international outcomes for students. coordinates a process mission of the school, that takes stock of coordination of needs as a basis for community agencies creating organizational and school partners, planning structures for and post-secondary the school. access and college credit opportunities. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 32.
  • SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 8. Students are grouped a. Students are assigned to d. School schedules and course g. School scheduling enables i. The school systematically heterogeneously for classes heterogeneously, to offerings are organized to middle school students to have organizes students into flexible, instruction except for the maximum extent support responsive learning access to high school level needs-based groups, as limited, targeted efforts possible. environments and student access courses and high school students appropriate, to accelerate to academic support services. to have access to college level mastery of local and state to accelerate specific b. Instruction matches the courses. standards; and national and learning outcomes. needs and interests of the e. School structures allow for international guidelines for students and is consistent tutoring, counseling, and parent h. High expectations are held for academic performance. with the skills, knowledge, training programs to support all students and instruction is and dispositions contained student learning and student rigorous and consistent with the j. The school seeks and obtains in the ISSN Graduate access to all instructional skills, knowledge, and additional funds to substantially Profile. offerings. dispositions contained in the enhance academic support for ISSN Graduate Profile. students, and increases c. The faculty develops f. Students have multiple opportunities for heterogeneous interventions and opportunities to participate in grouping. acceleration strategies to before-and after-school provide for students who intervention and enrichment need concentrated academic programs. support or enrichment. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 33.
  • 9. Decisions about critical a. School leaders and staff d. The school uses its authority f. Decision- making authority is i. Evidence exists that the school policies and have decision-making to make decisions regarding implemented at the school level, school’s use of decision-making practices are made at authority for recruitment recruitment and admissions, and roles and responsibilities are authority is linked to increased the school level and are and admissions,, staffing, staffing, budget, scheduling, clearly defined. student achievement. budget, instruction, instruction, and discipline, and informed by data on scheduling, and discipline works with the district liaison to g. Governing agencies are kept j. Collaborative decision-making student progress and in accordance with local advocate with local and state well informed of the rationale structures are sustained even performance, evidence initiatives and policies. governing agencies as needed. for programmatic decisions and during changes in key of effective practice, processes are in place for leadership. local context and b. School leaders and staff e. Specific roles, responsibilities negotiating any perceived contractual obligations. develop a plan for and decision making processes conflicts in policy and practice. k. Close communication exists collaborative decision- are implemented and refined as between the school and local making that defines roles, needed for workability. h. Structures for ongoing governing agencies to ensure responsibilities, and discussion, collaborative ongoing support. organizational structures. decision-making, reflection, refinement of processes, c. A liaison at the Central communication, and leadership Administration level is are distributed throughout the identified and serves as a school and involve parents and partner with the school students where appropriate. leadership team. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 10. The school provides a. Prior to the school’s e. A student council and/or h. The family-teacher-student k. A permanent coordinator is in opportunities for opening, a committee is student government is organization is an integral part place to promote parents’ and meaningful decision- established to promote established. of the school leadership and is students’ ongoing engagement making and engagement family engagement. an important support mechanism with school life. f. The family-teacher-student for teaching and learning. by families and students. b. A family-teacher-student organization plans activities in l. Families and students are organization is created. support of school-wide i. Student voice is respected in given leadership opportunities to initiatives, international decision-making, reflection, and engage in important issues that c. Numerous structured and learning, and student developing the school culture. impact learning. informal opportunities exist enrichment. for families to provide input j. Families and students are and feedback to the school g. Systems of communication members of a fully functioning and interact with faculty. and feedback are established to school decision-making engage families and guardians in structure. d. Multi-lingual support is important decisions. available as needed. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 34.
  • © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 35.
  • PROFESSIONAL LEARNING Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 1. School leaders, faculty, a. The faculty reads and c. Collaborative norms are e. The professional learning g. The faculty implements, staff, and partners are discusses the ISSN School systematically used and valued community, through its shared analyzes, reflects, researches, continuously focused on Design Matrix, compares it by the professional learning leadership and decision-making, and uses data to revise and refine understanding and with National, State, and community. is known for a culture of trust, the unified school plan which Local mandates and respect, inclusion, and producing results in student achievement implementing the ISSN initiatives, and develops d. Faculty teams use the ISSN results. that meets or exceeds local and school design. work groups for School Design Matrix to gather state standards; and meets implementing the ISSN data, assess current levels of f. The faculty develops and national and international Design and Implementation implementation, identify and implements one unified school guidelines for student Matrix and Graduate address gaps or areas of slow development plan that aligns the performance. Profile. progress, investigate alternatives ISSN School Design Matrix and or potential improvements, Graduate Profile with National, h. The school community serves b. School leaders, faculty, identify resources, make State, and Local mandates and as a model for and mentor to staff, and partners engage, recommendations and initiatives and is viewed as new international studies as a community, in communicate findings to the effective for enhancing teaching schools. collaborative discussions school community. and learning. and establish shared norms for professional learning. 2. School leaders, faculty, a. The faculty develops shared c. The faculty engages in e. Tools and strategies to g. The faculty uses a and staff collaboratively norms of practice based on collaborative discussion and structure collaborative work are sophisticated array of tools, and reflects on and analyzes the school’s mission and work that is structured by the use detailed, and might include strategies to structure existing classroom evidence of effective of tools and strategies including critical friends groups, lesson collaborative work including practices. review of student work, analysis study, walkthroughs, shared shared research. practices to improve of student performance data, and research, and peer mentoring. teaching and learning. b. The faculty engages in peer observation and protocols. h. The faculty uses evidence of collaborative discussion and f. The faculty shares the results improved teaching and learning work focused on improving d. The faculty uses the results of of their collaborative work and to guide collaborative work. instruction. their collaborative work to employs a variety of strategies to strengthen instruction. enhance instruction and support i. The faculty is actively engaged one another across the ISSN. in Communities of Practice within and across disciplines as well as within and outside ISSN. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 36.
  • PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 3. School leaders, faculty, a. The school adopts policies e. School leadership works with h. The faculty participates in l. The faculty formally shares staff, and partners and standards to guide faculty to develop a school-wide professional development to knowledge and materials engage in professional professional development. professional development plan strengthen discipline knowledge, acquired from outside sources development to acquire, based on student achievement international understanding, and with other school staff in b. The faculty develops data and identified needs from pedagogical skills on a monthly scheduled professional use, and create new individual professional the faculty. basis, and use this knowledge to development activities. knowledge of growth plans aligned to the enhance classroom instruction. international studies, ISSN Teacher Profile. f. Each grade level and/or m. The faculty contributes to the academic department team and individual i. The faculty formally share professional organizations, disciplines, and c. The faculty participates in has a professional development knowledge and materials in present at conferences, and pedagogical skills. professional development to plan that aligns with the school- scheduled professional publish in the literature based strengthen discipline wide plan. development activities and on professional development knowledge, international establishes action steps and and practice that has produced understanding, and g. The school community timelines to improve teaching positive, measurable results. pedagogical skills, including participates in on-going practices. that provided through the professional development, ISSN. including that provided through j. Faculty actively participates in the ISSN, and uses the network-wide activities of the d. Teachers are accountable knowledge and pedagogical ISSN, sharing practices and for demonstrating their skills gained to strengthen materials, and working ability to provide responsive instruction and to broaden their collaboratively on the instruction and foster high understanding of internationally development and refinement of performance by all students. significant issues. curriculum, assessment, and instructional practices. k. The school shares knowledge and materials with school partners, as appropriate. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 37.
  • PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 4. Grade level and a. The faculty, organized in c. Three or four times per year, f. Teams systematically analyze h. Changes in instructional discipline-based teams teams, periodically analyzes staff, organized in teams, assessment and other data at practice are evidence-based and use student achievement achievement and other analyze achievement and other regular intervals. informed by data, and made at and other data to inform readily available data to readily available data to identify the team level. identify learning gaps and learning gaps and establish g. Readily available data are decisions about teaching establish school-wide school- wide and team- based supplemented by information i. Sharing of data and successful and learning. priorities for instructional priorities for instructional collected through staff- practices occurs across teams. improvement. improvement. developed formative assessment Implementation of these data- measures, collaborative driven practices is linked to b. The faculty is provided with d. Data from formal assessments discussion and analysis of increases in student achievement training in formative are supplemented by student work using protocols on local and state standards; and assessment and each grade- information collected through and rubrics, and targeted national and international level and disciplinary team staff- developed formative observations, including surveys guidelines for academic is expected to identify or assessment measures and of parents, students, and other performance. develop tools for formative targeted observations. key stakeholders. assessment. e. School-wide trends suggesting achievement gaps among student groups are analyzed and appropriate interventions are implemented at the team level. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 38.
  • PROFESSIONAL LEARNING (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 5. The faculty identifies a. Staff research opportunities b. Staff members travel abroad e. Faculty travel abroad during h. Faculty travel abroad during and uses opportunities and develop initial plans for during their tenure at the their tenure at the school and their tenure at the school and for international travel international travel. school and incorporate incorporate travel-based lessons design standards-based units of and learning. travel experiences and effectively in the standards- study that incorporate travel perspectives in their based teaching of their experiences international teaching. discipline. perspectives, and resources to expand student experiences. c. Staff members traveling f. Staff members traveling abroad informally provide abroad formally provide i. Staff members traveling information and materials to information and materials to abroad formally provide other teachers. other teachers in scheduled information and materials to professional development other teachers and colleagues d. At least one teacher and/or activities. outside the school in scheduled student from outside the professional development country visit the school each g. At least one teacher and one activities. year. student from abroad spend a month or more at the school. j. There is a “Visiting Teacher in Residence” Program in which one or more foreign teachers spend at least a semester at the school. k. There is a “Visiting Student in Residence” Program in which one or more foreign students spend at least a semester at the school. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 39.
  • PARTNERSHIPS Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 1. Parents, families, and a. The staff creates a d. Parents, families, and g. The school has a system in j. Parents, families, and guardians are welcoming, accessible, and guardians are in regular place for engaging parents, guardians are actively involved productively involved in responsive environment for communication with classroom families, and guardians on a in school life and their children’s school life. parents, families, and teachers and administration wide variety of school issues. education. guardians in the school. about the progress of their children. h. Systems are in place to k. Parents, families, and b. The school provides respond to parents, families, and guardians regularly participate in families regular orientations e. Easily accessible structures guardians’ needs in supporting the assessment of students’ and materials on the school are developed for parents, their child’s academic major project presentations. program and its families, and guardians to be achievement and they are invited international focus. involved in school governance to help assess students’ major l. Parents, families, and (e.g., School Leadership project presentations. guardians, in collaboration with c. Parents, families, and Committee, Family, Teacher and school staff and community guardians understand and Student Organization, and other i. Systems and referral partners, create their own support the concept and school committees). mechanisms are in place to aid learning and support community importance of the parents, families, and guardians that provides multiple international focus of the f. School leaders and the staff in improving their own skills and opportunities for family school. communicate with parents, knowledge and to participate in seminars, support groups, etc. families, and guardians through learning activities within and a variety of publications, media outside of the school. and forums and in languages other than English, as needed. 2. The school leaders and a. The school hosts events that c. The school collects data on e. Parents, families, and g. Staff members have a deep staff respect and bring parents, families, and parents, families, and guardians systematically understanding of the appreciate the cultures, guardians into the school on guardians’ talents, interests, share their cultural heritage cultures of the parents, backgrounds, and values a regular basis, including and other resources that can with the school community. families and guardians, and events to welcome families be used to support and value their contributions to of their students' and highlight the enhance school programs. f. Parents, families, and the school. parents, families, and community’s cultural guardians assist staff and guardians and build on backgrounds. d. Parents, families, and students in deepening their h. The cultures of parents, those assets to guardians share their cultural awareness of and families, and guardians are strengthen the school’s b. The school identifies cultural backgrounds with sensitivity to the needs and considered an asset and are international dimension. resources to assist in the school community in backgrounds of their diverse consistently used as a basis communication with support of the international school community. for enhancing international parents, families, and studies curriculum. understanding. guardians that align with their cultural and linguistic background. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 40.
  • PARTNERSHIPS (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 3. The school develops key a. The school identifies and b. The school establishes a e. The school expands its h. There is a seamless partnerships with establishes communications network of partnerships and network of partnerships and integration of learning organizations such as with potential partners to begins to use these begins to use these partnerships experiences for students out of school time create shared roles and partnerships to provide to provide opportunities for provided on and off campus by opportunities that offer opportunities for student student learning within and key partners. providers, institutes of advisement, access to learning within and outside outside the school. higher education, resources, internship and the school. i. The school has stable and businesses, and arts and service opportunities, f. A system to cultivate and sustainable partnerships that cultural institutions participation in school c. Structures are provided for maintain internationally- provide opportunities for student which support student projects, and financial community partners to take focused partnerships and leadership, planning, and learning and enhance support to the school. steps toward student opportunities is initiative. the school’s institutionalizing school implemented and includes a international focus. partnerships (e.g., designated staff liaison to j. The school has established international career fair, oversee the process (e.g., internationally-focused community and service school advisory and an partnerships including those learning opportunities, international studies advisory with institutions abroad that student travel.) council). further the international mission of the school. d. Initial partnerships with g. Partnerships with institutes community colleges, 4-year of higher education provide the colleges, and other post- opportunity for students to secondary institutions are enroll in college courses, use established to familiarize university facilities for them with the school and to research and recreation, and begin to explore visitations, participate in academic and dual credit opportunities, cultural events, creating a and seminars. comfort level with the higher education environment. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 41.
  • PARTNERSHIPS (CONTINUED) Key Elements Beginning Emerging Proficient Exemplary At Least 50% At Least 75% At least 90% 4. Community-based a. The faculty learns about the c. The school has a system for f. There is a school committee h. The school has developed family service providers physical and mental health assessing the physical and made up of multiple stable and sustainable work in collaboration needs of students, assesses mental health needs of students stakeholders from within and partnerships with community with school staff to trends in students’ health in collaboration with community outside the school that provide a service providers ensuring a issues, and begins to service providers. comprehensive safety net of system of physical and mental ensure students’ explore partnerships with physical and mental health health services for students, physical, social, and community service d. Partnerships with community services to support students’ and parents, families, and guardians. emotional health. providers in support of service providers are formed to families’ well being. students’ needs. address students’ physical and i. The school has evidence that mental health needs. g. A broad mix of funding physical and mental health b. Grant opportunities and sources provides substantial problems have been reduced by other funding mechanisms e. Partnerships with community “outside” support for community intervention. are explored to establish service providers receive health partnerships. community health funding from sources outside the partnerships. school budget. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 42.
  • The ISSN Design Implementation Rubric is intended to assist educators who are part of the Asia Society’s International Studies Schools Network throughout all phases of the development of their schools. The Matrix Implementation Rubric:  Provides a blueprint for schools in planning, designing, and opening an ISSN school  Guides implementation and supports school wide reflection and self-assessment of implementation progress  Provides data needed to plan for continued growth and development as a Professional Learning Community from inception to sustaining a process of continuous improvement; and  Provides a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of the Asia Society ISSN design principles. How to Read and Use the School Design Implementation Rubric Variables: logic…beg to emerging, not every instance has to be there. Preponderance of activity has to be x; *=reaching….; not right to have progressively higher category. Hold question about whether there are elements we run up against where we need the 50%, 75%, 90% The ISSN criteria are not repeated across each level of implementation; rather, everything identified in the BEGINNING level is subsumed in the EMERGING, PROFICIENT, and EXEMPLARY levels. The criteria are intended to be appropriate to the specific stage of development. There is some intentional repetition of criteria across domains to ensure internal coherence and consistency across the entire rubric. As you read the ISSN Design Rubric you will see that the header for each key element also include percentages which are intended as rough guidelines for the expected level of intensity or depth of implementation of specific criteria across the faculty or student body. You will also find criteria for which the percentages have no significance. The percentages are a general measurement guideline to be considered only where appropriate. There are many ways to approach engaging planning teams, faculty and community in reading and understanding the Implementation criteria. Below is one suggestion. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 43.
  • • Select one domain to focus on for a week or the period of time between professional development sessions. Determine the most appropriate group to review the domain and participate in follow-up discussion of the school’s progress in that domain. Groupings might include grade level teams, departments, “interest alike” groups, the whole school faculty, or faculty-parent committees. Convene the appropriate group and: o Skim the document as a group and discuss any areas that may need clarification for common understanding. o Assign everyone (or small teams) the task of reading the criteria again in more detail, highlighting those that they feel the school has mastered to the level of expectation and those where further work must be done. o Over the designated period of time, ask the participants to observe the work going on in the school looking for evidence that matches up with these criteria. In the column provided, note observations and cite evidence. If possible, collect the relevant data and evidence such as test scores, student or parent comments, and etc for review at the next meeting. o Ask the group to bring their notes and data to the follow-up session where discussion and reflection will occur. Consider the quality and appropriateness of the data that has been collected, and determine what additional information should be gathered. When there is adequate information available to make informed judgments, identify areas of apparent success and challenges to address. Determine next steps and timelines. o Over the course of the year the entire ISSN Rubric could be discussed in this fashion. Look for connections to other events in the school. For example, periods of testing might be a good time to make observations and gather evidence on the assessment domain of the matrix. Or discuss the Family and Community Partnerships domain as the school prepares for Parent Orientations, Back to School Night, Parent Conferences, or Career Day Events. In designing Professional Development and support for the school’s use of the ISSN Rubric, ISSN Coaches may ask principals which aspects of the rubric will be the most challenging. The process of review and backwards planning might then begin with a guaranteed success to build momentum or begin with an identified challenge to get participants engaged. The decision about where to begin should be guided by © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 44.
  • the immediate concerns of the school community, the level of expertise and experience at the school, and the local context so that the ISSN Rubric becomes a powerful support for growth and development and meeting the specific needs of each school. © 2007 Asia Society. All rights reserved. Limited reproduction permission and use is granted to ISSN Schools 45.