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Ingold Curran Liu Designing Startalk Teacher Programs
 

Ingold Curran Liu Designing Startalk Teacher Programs

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    Ingold Curran Liu Designing Startalk Teacher Programs Ingold Curran Liu Designing Startalk Teacher Programs Presentation Transcript

    • National Chinese Language Conference April 30-May 2, 2009 Designing an Effective STARTALK Teacher Program: Successful Models Catherine Ingold, NFLC Mary Curran, Rutgers University Jennifer Liu, Indiana University, Bloomington
    • Designing an Effective STARTALK Teacher Program Mary Curran [email_address] Graduate School of Education Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey National Chinese Language Conference, 2009
    • Plan for the Presentation
      • Rutgers Chinese Language Teacher Initiatives
      • Rutgers STARTALK Teacher Program
      • Keys to a Successful STARTALK Teacher Program
    • Rutgers Chinese Language Teacher Initiatives
      • Traditional Five-year and Post-Baccalaureate Programs For Ed.M. Degree and Certification
      • Chinese Masters of Arts for Teachers
      • Chinese Language Teacher Alternate Route Program
    • Chinese Language Teacher Alternate Route Program
      • 19 Credit Program
      • Pre-Service Summer Component
        • Methods Course
        • Assessment Course
        • Practicum
      • In-Service Academic-Year Component
    • STARTALK Teacher and Student Program
      • Summer Camp for Middle and High School Students
      • Professional Development for Teacher Candidates
    • Princeton and West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School Districts’ Chinese Summer Camp
        • Two week, non-residential program for middle and high school students
        • Three student levels: beginner, intermediate, and heritage
        • Three lead teachers
        • Standards-based, immersion program
    • STARTALK Teacher Training Opportunities
      • Methods Course
      • Practicum Course
        • Pre-camp Preparation Meeting
        • Two-week Summer Camp
        • Post-camp Reflection Meeting
    • STARTALK FUNDS
      • Teacher candidate scholarships
      • Lead teachers’ and coordinators’ salaries
      • Activity leaders from the community
      • Material purchases
      • Student lunches
      • Student field trip
    • Teacher Program Objectives
          • Preparing teachers to engage in standards-based pedagogy reflecting the Chinese language and culture
          • Developing a pre-service experience for teacher candidates
          • Providing teacher candidates with the opportunity to gain real teaching experience with actual students, and learn how to cope with the significant cultural differences between the Chinese and American school systems
          • Awarding scholarships to teachers in heritage Chinese language schools to attract them to the public school arena
          • Tracking of program participants to initiate a research study following the Chinese language teacher preparation experience of the participants
          • Fostering a new generation of expert teachers and teacher trainers
    • Methods Course
      • Course Readings:
        • H. Curtain & C. A. Dahlberg, (2005). Languages and Children--Making the Match: New Languages and Young Learners. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
        • J. L. Shrum & E. W. Glisen, (2008). Teacher’s Handbook: Contextualized Language Instruction Boston, MA:Heinle.
      • Introduction to SLA and language pedagogy
      • Designing a performanced-based thematic unit, daily lesson plans and activities aligned to New Jersey world language standards and ACTFL standards for Chinese learning
      • Designing integrated, performance-based assessments
    •  
    • Practicum Course
      • Standards-based Instruction
      • Observations of Experienced Teachers
      • Micro-teaching
      • Guided Reflections with Teacher Educators
      • Opportunities to Create Short- and Long-Term Professional Development Plans
    • Standards-Based ACTFL/NCATE/NJPTS
      • Pre-practicum Meeting
      • Course requirements (3 graduate credits)
        • Attendance
        • Participation
        • Focus on Daily Topics in Discussions and Journals
        • Final Reflection Paper
      • Post-practicum Meeting
    • Teachers’ Daily Schedule
      • Arrive at Princeton High School
      • Help with student arrivals and check in
      • Participate in tai chi welcome, warm-up activity
      • Observe and assist teachers
      • Conduct small group activities
      • Eat lunch with students
      • Assist community guest teachers
      • Attend and assist in daily culminating program
      • Meet for guided reflection, plan for next day, and create materials
    •  
    • Teachers’ Daily Schedule
      • Arrive at Princeton High School
      • Help with student arrivals and check in
      • Participate in tai chi welcome, warm-up activity
      • Observe and assist teachers
      • Conduct small group activities
      • Eat lunch with students
      • Assist community guest teachers
      • Attend and assist in daily culminating program
      • Meet for guided reflection, plan for next day, and create materials
    •  
    •  
    • Teachers’ Daily Schedule
      • Arrive at Princeton High School
      • Help with student arrivals and check in
      • Participate in tai chi welcome, warm-up activity
      • Observe and assist teachers
      • Conduct small group activities
      • Eat lunch with students
      • Assist community guest teachers
      • Attend and assist in daily culminating program
      • Meet for guided reflection, plan for next day, and create materials
    •  
    •  
    • Teachers’ Daily Schedule
      • Arrive at Princeton High School
      • Help with student arrivals and check in
      • Participate in tai chi welcome, warm-up activity
      • Observe and assist teachers
      • Conduct small group activities
      • Eat lunch with students
      • Assist community guest teachers
      • Attend and assist in daily culminating program
      • Meet for guided reflection, plan for next day, and create materials
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Teachers’ Daily Schedule
      • Arrive at Princeton High School
      • Help with student arrivals and check in
      • Participate in tai chi welcome, warm-up activity
      • Observe and assist teachers
      • Conduct small group activities
      • Eat lunch with students
      • Assist community guest teachers
      • Attend and assist in daily culminating program
      • Meet for guided reflection, plan for next day, and create materials
    •  
    • Teachers’ Daily Schedule
      • Arrive at Princeton High School
      • Help with student arrivals and check in
      • Participate in tai chi welcome, warm-up activity
      • Observe and assist teachers
      • Conduct small group activities
      • Eat lunch with students
      • Assist community guest teachers
      • Attend and assist in daily culminating program
      • Meet for guided reflection, plan for next day, and create materials
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Teachers’ Daily Schedule
      • Arrive at Princeton High School
      • Help with student arrivals and check in
      • Participate in tai chi welcome, warm-up activity
      • Observe and assist teachers
      • Conduct small group activities
      • Eat lunch with students
      • Assist community guest teachers
      • Attend and assist in daily culminating program
      • Meet for guided reflection, plan for next day, and create materials
    • End of the Day
    •  
    •  
    • Additional Activities
      • Accompany students on field trip
      • Meet for one-on-one feedback sessions with teacher trainers
      • Create lessons for last day festival
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Additional Activities
      • Meet for one-on-one feedback sessions with teacher trainers
        • Teacher candidates choose goals for the practicum together with teacher trainers
        • Teacher candidates consider their long-term professional development needs
    • Last Day Festival
    •  
    • Keys for Success
      • K-12 collaboration which models best practice;
      • Teacher candidates have the opportunity to observe, practice with REAL K-12 students, and reflect;
      • Teacher candidates receive feedback and guidance;
    • Keys for Success
      • Teacher candidates become members of a teacher learning community;
      • Teacher candidates have the opportunity to observe multiple levels of instruction;
      • Teacher candidates have the opportunity to practice;
      • Teacher candidates observe how to make connections to the community;
    • Keys for Success
      • Teacher candidates receive on-going guided support and opportunities to reflect;
      • Programs are adequately funded for teacher support, materials, and teacher candidate scholarships; and
      • Teacher candidates learn that becoming a teacher is a life-long process.
    • National Chinese Language Conference April 30-May 2, 2009 Designing an Effective STARTALK Teacher Program: A Model at Indiana University Jennifer Liu Indiana University, Bloomington
    • Outline
      • Program description
      • Participant summary
      • Training model & instructional approach
      • Program outcome: knowledge, skills, and perspective changed
      • Program evaluation
      • Recommendation
    • Program Description 1
      • Chinese Pedagogy Institute (CPI), designed to enhance the knowledge and skills of current and prospective secondary school teachers of Chinese .
      • Through a course of study worth 4-5 graduate credits awarded by Indiana University’s School of Education that partially fulfills requirements for secondary teacher certification in Chinese:
      • EDUC L520: Advanced Study in Foreign Language Teaching (3 credit hours)—for beginning track ;
      • EDUC L530: Topical Workshop in Language Education: Designing and Implementing Secondary Chinese Program (3 credit hours)—for advanced track ;
      • EDUC M501: Laboratory/Field Experience (2 credit hours for beginning track and 1 credit hour for advanced track).
    • Program Description 2
      • Understand major issues relevant to Chinese language teaching and learning in the areas of grammar and vocabulary , listening and speaking , literacy (characters, reading, writing), culture , learning strategies , and classroom management ;
      • Analyze a class in action and recognize its strengths and weaknesses;
      • Design lesson plans and enhance instructional strategies for high school learners;
      • Apply designed plans to a real classroom setting;
      • Assess the effectiveness of the lesson plans in terms of their incorporation of the five goals identified in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century  communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, communities;
      • Assess the effectiveness of peer instruction with class observation checklist;
      • Reflect upon their professional development experiences and identify the “best moments ” in their teaching and learning with the aid of advanced technology; and
      • Help create professional development opportunities and resources by submitting lesson plans and unit plans for posting on a publicly accessible Web site.
    • Program Description 3
      • Understand major issues relevant to Chinese language teaching and learning in the areas of curriculum design , material development , task preparation , and assessment of instruction and student work ;
      • Analyze and revise existing syllabi by addressing their strengths and weaknesses;
      • Create stories that will appeal to 6th-12th graders;
      • Design learning tasks and lesson plans for middle school learners;
      • Apply designed tasks and plans to a real classroom setting;
      • Assess the effectiveness of the tasks and lesson plans in terms of their incorporation of the 5 goals identified in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century  communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, communities;
      • Assess the effectiveness of peer instruction with class observation checklist;
      • Develop tests to gauge students’ learning progress;
      • Reflect upon their professional development experiences and capture the “highlights” in their teaching and learning with the aid of advanced technology; and
      • Help create professional development opportunities and resources by submitting lesson plans, syllabi, reading materials, and tests for posting on a publicly accessible Web site.
    • Program Description 4
      • Time: 2 and ½ weeks (mid June to early July)
      • Location: Bradford Woods (Week 1)
      • Bloomington campus (Week 2 and on)
      • Instructors: Jennifer Liu, Michael Everson, Claire Kotenbeutel
      • Applicants: 48 applications from 15 states: Alabama, California, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin, including one from overseas (Hong Kong) (Y1: 27 applicants from 11 states)
      • Participants: 24 trainees were accepted: 16 for beginning track, and 8 for advanced track. (Y1: 14)
      • Selection Criteria: the applicants’ need for professional development, their plan for pursuing certification, and the level of their language proficiency, both in Chinese and English.
    • Participant Summary 1
      • Experience: 0 to 20+ years (2009)
    • Participant Summary 2
      • Experience: 0 to 12 years (2008)
      Gender F 12 M 2 Country of Origin China 5 Taiwan 5 U.S. 4 Status US citizen 10 PR 3 J1 visa 1 State of Residence IN 8 Other 6 Employment practicing teachers 11 prospective teachers 3 Education level MA 9 BA 5 Disciplines Business management Accounting Materials engineering Information science Political science Food and nutrition Industrial education English language and literature Comparative literature TESOL East Asian studies
    • Participant Summary 3
      • Practicum Subjects:
      • Y1: 12 HS
      • Y2: 12 MS, 10 HS
      • Practicum Hours:
      • Y1: 10 hours
      • Y2: 28 hours for HS, 14 for MS
      • Selection Criteria:
      • Have never studied Chinese
      • Prior experience in foreign languages
      • Commit to attending all sessions
      • Participation Payment: $75
    • Training Model Classroom Scenario Warm-up & Problem-solving Theory & Research Group Discussion Class Analysis Paired Observation Lesson Plan Demo Paired Practice Materials & Resources Review Individual Sharing Coaching & Consultation Individual Trainer Reflection Team
    • Instructional Approach
      • From theory to practice
      • From observation to hands-on practice
      • From analysis to synthesis
      • From paired to individual work
      • From decision-making process to curriculum product
          • Anticipation
          • Instructional Design
          • Classroom Implementation
          • Reflection
      • Focus on communication in the U.S. context
      • Focus on teamwork (trainers/trainees): Y2
      • Focus on peer mentoring (7 groups): Y1
    • Program Outcome 1
      • Knowledge gain
      • class discussions, reflective journals, lesson plans, and unit plans
      • Skill development
      • Teaching —“ before ” (mock teaching) and “ after ” (practicum) videos
      • Technology — 5-8 minute best moments for e-portfolio, http://www.indiana.edu/~celtie/cpi/cpi.html
      • Perspective change
          • Questionnaire on Chinese Language Teaching and Learning (49 common “ misconceptions ” )
          • Teachers ’ can-do statements
      • Overall growth: Becoming professionals
      • Offering regional workshops, attending conferences, pursuing degree programs, etc.
    • Program Outcome 2
      • This questionnaire included forty-nine common “misconceptions” in the areas of (1) SLA, (2) grammar, (3) error formation/correction, (4) listening and speaking, (5) learner strategies, (6) classroom management, (7) textbooks, (8) literacy, (9) cultures, (10) technology, and (11) assessment.
      • SLA
          • You learn language through constant repetition, memorizing dialogues, and repeating phrases.
          • The most important factor in second language acquisition success is motivation.
          • The earlier a second language is introduced in school programs, the greater the likelihood of success in learning.
          • When learners are allowed to interact freely, they learn each others’ mistakes.
          • Students’ interacting with other students of the same proficiency level in Chinese is a waste of time.
          • Students learn what they are taught.
    • Program Outcome 3
      • The areas with the most perspective change with statistically significance are: (1) literacy, (2) listening and speaking, (3) assessment, and (4) learner strategies
      • The statements with the most perspective change with statistically significance are:
          • You learn language through constant repetition, memorizing dialogues, and repeating phrases.
          • The most important factor in second language acquisition success is motivation.
          • The earlier a second language is introduced in school programs, the greater the likelihood of success in learning.
          • When learners are allowed to interact freely, they learn each others’ mistakes.
    • Can-do Statements
      • These can-do statements are used to measure teachers’ knowledge growth in nine standard areas:
        • linguistic competency
        • cultural knowledge
        • second language acquisition
        • diverse learners
        • learning environment
        • instructional planning and strategies
        • assessment
        • professional development
        • technology
    • Program Evaluation
      • Internal:
      • Teacher trainees
          • Post-CPI institute evaluation
          • Exit interview
          • Email exchanges
      • Teacher trainers
          • Post-CPI institute evaluation
      • Student subjects
          • Post-CPI institute evaluation
      • External:
      • Site visitors
      • Project Planning
      • Strong administrative support is a must.
      • Find a site that is conducive to group bonding and dynamics .
      • Check and confirm trainees’ language proficiency, both English and Chinese to ensure that their language proficiency is sufficient to benefit from the experience.
      • Ensure that every trainee is committed to completing the entire institute and ready to work and share with others .
      • Design a procedure to ensure that all who register will attend the training program .
      • Obtain necessary information from trainees early on, and let them know what is expected as soon as possible.
      • Demonstrate cooperative learning and teaching by building an instructional team with trainers complementing each other’s expertise.
      • Assess what technological resources (Internet access, printing, etc.) will be needed to complete assignments and ensure that they are provided.
      Recommendation
      • Project Implementation
      • Provide one or more full-time assistants to help with administrative and other tasks.
      • Email teacher trainees the reading materials for the first day and have them come prepared . This will reduce the stress on the evening of their arrival.
      • Explain and reiterate the rationale for surveys, reflective journals and all other course assignments.
      • Adjust curriculum and methodology to address trainees with a wide range of backgrounds and proficiency.
      • Observe group dynamics closely, and make necessary pairing adjustments or a llow trainees to find their own partners for pair work to avoid personality conflicts.
      • Never assume a trainee will be a good mentor simply because he or she is more experienced.
      • Prepare a guideline for teamwork (e.g., equal workload, ways of negotiation) and include opportunities for “ solo performance .”
      • Ensure that every trainee has the right version of Windows, Office Suite and fonts to be able to open, read, and create files that can be displayed properly .
      Recommendation