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  • NOTES  TO  THE  TRAINER:   For  more  details,  see  the  Field  Guide. The sample unit elements used here are from a 9 th grade ELA curriculum. You may want to change the examples based on the audience. You may also choose to have sample units available from other schools or consultants in the network. Welcome  participants.     Provide  a  brief  overview  of  the  module .   Description:  Presentation  of  the  design  and  components  of  the  GPS  Learning  System   provides  participants  the  basic  understanding  of  the  importance  of  high-quality,   college  ready  work  and  how  to  incorporate  expectations  for  global  competencies.   This Module focuses on designing units of study. It requires participants already understanding the basics of the performance outcomes, the graduate profile, and the instructional approach.
  • Units represent a sequence of instruction that incorporates one of more performance tasks, allowing students to produce work showcasing their progress towards developing global competencies and college readiness.
  • Discuss how curriculum is already organized. Are there units, chapters, sections, themes? What is the common language for how instruction is sequence and organized? Which units stand out? What’s already working? How are those sections of curriculum organized?
  • These are the basic components of a Unit Design vary and there are a number of planning templates available. Generally though, units include Essential Understandings Essential Questions Strategies/Skills Performance Outcomes Other Outcomes Assessments Resources
  • Essential Understandings describe to long-term, “big leanings” that students will walk away from the project with. The Essential Questions serve as a “hook” or an area of interest to drive inquiry. These essential questions also anchor the work in some relevance. “ Why are we doing this?” “ To give us information and experiences to answer the essential question.” Here are examples from Unit 1 of the Village Voices curriculum for 9 th grade ELA.
  • “ Strategies and Skills” refers to both instructional techniques and learning techniques. Teachers in this overview phase of designing a unit list out the various strategies they will need to help students access the information. Select a subset of the performance outcomes. It is possible that a unit may address many or all of the performance outcomes, but it is best practice to narrow and focus. Whatever performance outcomes are selected should be assessed directly.
  • Other outcomes provides a section for teachers to list those expectations which may not be essential, but are secondary or expressive outcomes that should come from the experience. Some teachers focus on skill building, like time management or goal setting. Others focus on social or behavioral improvements, such as cooperating in a group or contributing to a community. In any case, the purpose is to clearly identity what you hope for students, so you can create an overall plan that meets your goals. Which kind of focus does this example provide? Assessments include both formative and summative assessments. Formative assessments help monitor progress and inform decisions about what to do next. Summative assessments come at the end of an experience, to summarize the learning. Which kind of assessment does this example provide? Resources and research provide a reference for teachers to capture
  • Some people prefer to plan their ideas on sticky notes so they can easily be moved around. Other jump right on the computer or grab chart paper. Whatever the process, it’s important to follow a sequence in which the previous learning or experience is increase by the next, rather than a string of disconnected lessons. Use the essential questions to help keep the focus of the sequence of experiences.
  • What do you like about this sequence? What would you add or change?
  • Of course this is hard to read. This is just showing the template.
  • Time is always in scarce supply. A good unit is focused on a few essential outcomes, with specific experiences that connect and build one after the other. Checkpoints are necessary and should be built into the process. Rather than have to “stop” and “go back over” information, teachers should build in time to review and give feedback. If that time is not needed, then the unit will move even faster. Putting it “back” in later, however, can be a problem and lead to frustration. Students should also have choices in their work, whether it is in how they do the work or in what they produce. Giving choices to kids builds buy-in, opens up discussions for differentiation, and engages students in their learning. It is a very powerful strategy that is often overlooked.
  • It’s time to get to work. We reviewed an example, now let’s get started. We can use the template that was used for the example or another if you prefer. Start with the essential understandings you want for students and move on. Not everyone plans the same way and don’t worry about getting it “right” the first time. The key concept is to start with the end in mind and build your plan backwards. Keep asking yourself, what would kids have needed to do or know right before that? Before that? You’ll end up backplannig with the end in mind.

Transcript

  • 1.
  • 2. Graduation Portfolio Modules Modules Module 1 What is GPS? Module 2 What are Performance Outcomes? Module 3 How are Performance Outcomes Connected to Our Standards? Module 4 What kind of Instruction Supports our Work? Module 5 How do I Design Performance Tasks? Module 6 How do we Design Units that Support this Work? Module 7 What makes a High Quality Unit? Module 8 How do we give Meaningful Feedback to Students? Module 9 How do we connect this GPS work to our work across the network? Module 10 How do Students Manage the Process?
  • 3. Unit Design Module 6
  • 4. Objectives
    • Participants will be able to answer:
    • How do we design units that support this work?
  • 5. Introduction
    • Discuss:
    • What are some great instructional units we currently do across departments or schoolwide?
  • 6. Backplan from the Graduate Profile
    • Review the graduate profile and performance outcomes
      • What kind of work should students be producing?
      • What kind of lessons should students participate in?
  • 7. Components of a Unit Design
    • Essential Understandings
    • Essential Questions
    • Strategies/Skills
    • Performance Outcomes
    • Other Outcomes
    • Assessments
    • Resources
  • 8. Essential Understanding & Questions Essential Understandings Essential Questions We are the authors of our identity We each have unique qualities The way that others view us does not define who we are Our story as a learner can be re-written Who am I right now? What stories do I tell about myself? What stories do others tell about me?
  • 9. Strategies/Skills & Performance Outcomes Strategies/Skills Performance Outcomes Free Writing Brainstorming Writing Process (collection, drafting, revising, editing, publication) Close reading/analysis Analysis & Inquiry: Analyzes and evaluates the ideas and arguments presented in texts; understands how texts are situated within their cultural, historical contexts, genre, and/or personal experience and recognizes their significance. Structure & Organization: Presents a clear controlling idea/thesis that guides the writing or presentation; demonstrates coherence and an internal structure that supports the whole document. Reflection & Advocacy: Uses language and multi-media to present a clear and compelling position of advocacy; reflects on new insights, changes in personal views or attitudes, resulting from analysis and inquiry. Command of Language: Demonstrates a command of language; uses digital technology, communication tools and/or networks appropriately to access, integrate, and present information.
  • 10. Other Outcomes, Assessments, & Resources OUTCOMES ASSESSMENTS RESOURCES & RESEARCH Difficulty in my past does not define who I am in my future I have positive traits that are similar to well-known and accomplished people and/or characters I have unique abilities that enrich my community
    • A compilation CD that represents who they are as a person and as a learner.
    • Each CD will contain:
    • Title
    • Symbol on cover
    • Liner notes that explain the process of making the CD
    • Titles of all songs and artists
    • “ Letter to listener” explaining the CD
    “ Reading and Writing Territories” by Nancie Atwell Songs that tell stories about people CD covers from real albums
  • 11. Sequence the Instruction
    • Once you set your outcomes and assessments, it’s time to identify the sequence of instruction
  • 12. Example of a Sequence OVERALL PLANS Part 1: Introduction to course, reading and writing territories, introduce writing process and literacy notebook. Part 2 (collecting): character traits and actions, “types of people”, assigning character traits to ourselves – past, present, and future, initial reading assessment Part 3 (collecting): picking music/lyrics that represent our character traits, doing close reading and analysis of lyrics and showing how they can use this skill for texts in other non-fiction reading. Part 4 (drafting): looking closely at CD covers and using them as “mentor texts”, picking a symbol and cover template and begin first draft. Part 5: (revising/editing): finishing work on CD cover, rehearsing/preparing for presentations Part 6: (publication): students share CDs through presentations and write reflection called “letter to listener”
  • 13. The Example All Put Together Essential Understandings Essential Questions Strategies/Skills Performance Outcomes Individuals influence groups and groups influence individuals Culture is a determinate in individual behavior How does our personality influence how we learn? What persuades us to make a choice? Reader response Write & think aloud Making connections Visualizing Writing a summary Oral presentation (prosody) Analysis & Inquiry: Analyzes and evaluates the ideas and arguments presented in texts; analyzes author’s style and distinctive use of language reflective of a cultural view; understands how texts are situated within their cultural, historical contexts, genre, and/or personal experience and recognizes their significance. OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT RESOURCES & RESEARCH OVERALL PLANS Difficulty in my past does not define who I am in my future I have positive traits that are similar to well-known and accomplished people and/or characters I have unique abilities that enrich my community
    • A compilation CD that represents who they are as a person and as a learner.
    • Each CD will contain:
    • Title
    • Symbol on cover
    • Liner notes that explain the process of making the CD
    • Titles of all songs and artists
    • “ Letter to listener” explaining the CD
    “ Reading and Writing Territories” by Nancie Atwell Songs that tell stories about people CD covers from real albums Part 1: Introduction to course, reading and writing territories, introduce writing process and literacy notebook. Part 2 (collecting): character traits and actions, “types of people”, assigning character traits to ourselves – past, present, and future, initial reading assessment Part 3 (collecting): picking music/lyrics that represent our character traits, doing close reading and analysis of lyrics and showing how they can use this skill for texts in other non-fiction reading. Part 4 (drafting): looking closely at CD covers and using them as “mentor texts”, picking a symbol and cover template and begin first draft. Part 5: (revising/editing): finishing work on CD cover, rehearsing/preparing for presentations Part 6: (publication): students share CDs through presentations and write reflection called “letter to listener”
  • 14. Intervention
    • Build in time for review, re-teaching, and intervening
    • An integrated unit has checkpoints, moments for feedback, and is flexible for making adjustments
    • Student choice should also be a part of the plan
  • 15. Let’s Get to Work
    • Identify the essential understandings
    • Identify the performance outcomes
    • Develop essential questions
    • Develop a summative assessment
    • Identify your strategies and skills
    • Identify your resources
    • Create a sequence that makes sense
    • Build in checkpoints and intervention ideas
  • 16. Planning Template Essential Understandings Essential Questions Strategies/Skills Performance Outcomes OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT OVERALL PLANS RESOURCES & RESEARCH
  • 17. Classroom Follow-up
    • How will we communicate these ideas to the student?
      • Advisory?
      • Content area courses?
      • Schoolwide?