E d u c a t in g f o r G lo b a l C o mp e te nc e                            Global Education Massachusetts              ...
ISSN School Performance Versus      Comparison School Performance908070                           ISSN Schools60          ...
Global Competence                    4
International Studies Schools NetworkDesign Model                                   Vision, Mission,                      ...
Vision, Mission, Culture           • Shared definition of             success: globally             competent, college rea...
Curriculum, Assessment &                 InstructionWhat would globally focusedcurriculum and instruction “looklike” in …....
Professional Learning Community• Collaborative development of the globally focused  curriculum and the capacities to deliv...
Family and Community Partnerships• Family involvement that  engages families as  partners and calls on  their diverse asse...
The Graduation Performance SystemThe Graduation Performance System (GPS) is a school basedperformance assessment system de...
GPS Performance OutcomesA process to produce and assess student work in relation to a set    of performance outcomes and r...
Designing Effective Tasks                            13
Communicate andcollaborate to                      Scoring Tasksexpress anddiscuss scientificideas usingappropriatevocabul...
Refining Tasks                 15
To learn more,   come to Our 5th        Annual  Conference in New      York City!    June 29 – 30, 2012         Register a...
Global massachuetts  - Tony Jackson
Global massachuetts  - Tony Jackson
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Global massachuetts - Tony Jackson

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Tony Jackson's presentation to the Global Massachusetts meeting on May 1.

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  • Asia Society, in collaboration with the Council of Chief State School Officers, has defined global competence as the capacity and disposition to use knowledge and skills in various disciplines to understand and act on issues of global significance. Specifically, globally competent students are able to perform the following four competences: Investigate the World . Formulate and explore globally significant questions and create a coherent response that considers multiple perspectives and draws useful and defensible conclusions. Weigh Perspectives. Students recognize that they have a particular perspective and that others may or may not share it. They can then articulate and explain the perspectives of other people and can compare their perspective with others and construct a new point of view. Communicate Ideas and Collaborate with diverse audiences. Globally competent students are proficient in English, the lingua franca of world commerce, and at least one other language. They are also skilled users of media and technology to support learning, work and understanding across cultures. Take Action . Globally competent students see themselves as being capable of making a difference and recognize opportunities to do so. They’re able to weigh options based on evidence and insight, assess potential for impact, consider possible consequences for others, and act and reflect on those actions.
  • For teachers and school leaders, the GPS provides a method and tools for integrating performance based instruction and assessment in the curriculum to meet Common Core State Standards and standards for global competence. For students, it provides a process for developing knowledge and skills, and for producing work that demonstrates their proficiency through reliable performance based assessment.
  • The GPS operationalizes the definition of global competence in a set of performance outcomes for each of six disciplines: English Language Arts, History/Social Science, Mathematics, Science, the Arts, and World Languages. 12 th grade performance outcomes indicate in measurable terms the what student work should look like if it demonstrates global competence. 10 th , 8 th , and 5 th grade performance outcomes indicate the kind of evidence in student work to look for as students develop proficiency through their middle and high school career.   The GPS also defines a set of a cross cutting global leadership performance outcomes that reflect students’ competency to investigate the world, recognize perspectives, communicate ideas and take action.   GPS performance outcomes are intentionally aligned to Common Core state standards. According to “cross-walk” analysis conducted by the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) founded by David Conley, “( In general, the nature of the relationship is complementary. Students who master the Asia Society’s global competencies in ELA and Mathematical Practices would be expected to significantly increase mastery of the CCSS. Conversely, students who master the CCSS ELA Anchor Standards and Mathematical Practices would be better prepared to master the ELA and Math Asia Society Performance Outcomes.) Teachers define success in terms of the global competence performance outcomes and Common Core or other state standards that the task will enable to achieve
  • The Task Design process involves “storyboarding” a series of learning activities and formative assessments of student work. Teachers also specify instructional strategies that promote the development of 21 st skills and global competencies. The task culminates in a summative performance where students are asked to apply their learning to an engaging, authentic problem of global significance. The task culminates in a summative assessment, which involves the production of student work that can range widely in form – from written essays to video or multi-media presentations – to works of art.
  • Once students produce work in relation to the summative performance assessment, teachers score the work using rubrics derived from the performance outcomes. Scoring involves identifying evidence in students work that reflects the criteria for proficiency outlined in the scoring rubrics and providing feedback to students on the quality of the work in relation to these criteria.   So rather than the traditional practice of students expressing what they have learned by regurgitating isolated facts on a multiple choice exam, students are graded on a performance of their understanding that requires applying their knowledge to a challenging, relevant question.   It’s analogous to determining how well someone can drive, where, after they have received expert instruction in the rules of the road and had an opportunity to practice, we determine how well they can drive by observing their actual performance on the road. If they do well enough, they get a license, if not, they get feedback on how their performance fell short that helps them know what they need to learn to pass. This article has been taken from a unit (10 grade science course) where students were asked to discuss the pros and cons of stem cell research in the US and around the world. The task asked students do develop a newsletter to express various perspectives on the issue. This excerpt is one of the articles that was featured in a news letter and shows evidence of how the student is communicating ideas aligned to the Asia Society Science Performance Outcomes. There were also various examples in the newsletter that exemplified the student's ability to recognize perspectives and investigate ideas. 
  • Scoring student work enables teachers to provide individual feedback to students about their work and it also provides a means for teachers to look across a body of student work for patterns – where students generally area able to develop the understanding and skills they need and where they are most challenged. Reviewing student work in this way, individually or collectively, provides powerful feedback to teachers that they can use to refine the task to better meet students learning needs. Teachers consistently tell us that this kind of collaborative review of student work in relation to clear criteria is the best professional development they ever have.
  • Global massachuetts - Tony Jackson

    1. 1. E d u c a t in g f o r G lo b a l C o mp e te nc e Global Education Massachusetts Anthony Jackson, Vice President, EducationMay 1, 2012
    2. 2. ISSN School Performance Versus Comparison School Performance908070 ISSN Schools60 Outperformed 83 of 11950 times40 Comparison Schools30 Outperformed 36 of 119 times2010 0
    3. 3. Global Competence 4
    4. 4. International Studies Schools NetworkDesign Model Vision, Mission, and School Culture Curriculum, Assessment,Professional Learning Successful & Instruction Communities ISSN School School Organization Partnerships and Governance
    5. 5. Vision, Mission, Culture • Shared definition of success: globally competent, college ready graduates • High expectations for all students to gain the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of a college ready, globally competent citizen
    6. 6. Curriculum, Assessment & InstructionWhat would globally focusedcurriculum and instruction “looklike” in ….• Science?• English Language Arts?• Social Studies?• World Language?• Interdisciplinary Coursework?
    7. 7. Professional Learning Community• Collaborative development of the globally focused curriculum and the capacities to deliver it in engaging and effective ways• Professional education that includes shared teacher learning, international travel and exchanges, and personal goal setting with a focus on global skills and understandings
    8. 8. Family and Community Partnerships• Family involvement that engages families as partners and calls on their diverse assets as sources of international learning at the school• Community partnerships that foster and extend the school’s international mission and students’ learning opportunities
    9. 9. The Graduation Performance SystemThe Graduation Performance System (GPS) is a school basedperformance assessment system designed to transformcurriculum, instruction and assessment in schools. 11
    10. 10. GPS Performance OutcomesA process to produce and assess student work in relation to a set of performance outcomes and rubrics that demonstrate college readiness and global competence in: 6 Core Subject Disciplines 4 Domains of Global Leadership Investigate the World Recognize Perspectives Communicate Ideas Take Action These criteria are derived from, and aligned with: Common Core/ ISSN Graduate District/School State Standards Profile Curriculum 12
    11. 11. Designing Effective Tasks 13
    12. 12. Communicate andcollaborate to Scoring Tasksexpress anddiscuss scientificideas usingappropriatevocabulary,symbolsconventions andmedia. Discussthe significance ofa science issue. 14
    13. 13. Refining Tasks 15
    14. 14. To learn more, come to Our 5th Annual Conference in New York City! June 29 – 30, 2012 Register at:www.asiasociety.org/pglconfer ence

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