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Highlights from the Web 2.0 Expo Conference - May 2010

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Highlights from the sessions I attended at the Web 2.0 Expo conference in San Francisco in May 2010.

Highlights from the sessions I attended at the Web 2.0 Expo conference in San Francisco in May 2010.

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  • Image Source:http://www.flickr.com/photos/oreillyconf/4586237726/sizes/m/in/set-72157623869278867/
  • Google still largest driver of traffic to news sites, however:Growth rate is slowingTraffic from social media sites increasingTraffic from social media is better traffic (more page views and time on site)
  • U-turn traffic from GooglePublishers frustrated that they’re paying for SEO and PPC, but the traffic is not sticky:30% of the top publishers’ traffic comes from Google.But, 30% of users immediately go back to Google after clicking on the SERP link.“So, what’s the point?”, publishers are asking.
  • Apture.com has a plug-in that news sites can use to keep visitors on their site when they want to search for more info.Being used by NYT, WSJ, Washington Post
  • Identity (instead of anonymity) = Better comments and stickinessFor NYT, Twitter traffic 3-4x more valuable than Facebook trafficStay longer and more engaged; older demographicShareThis has found better engagement from Facebook than Twitter (for non-news content)All agree that email is the most engaging
  • Facebook “Like” button (way for FB to index the web)Seeing transition from Google (information web) to Facebook (social web)
  • Integrated and Immersive Ads (“Frictionless Internet”)Apple’s iAd PlatformRead about a movie, buy tickets, get map all from one screenAds are still in 1995; Internet can do so much moreSeeing more immersive ads in social gamingIncrease in location-based ads and contenthttp://www.cooliris.com/partners/advertisers/
  • Presentation by Sam Ramji (Sonoa – API infrastructure)Worked at MicrosoftHow developers can access a company’s data/contenthttp://youare.s3.amazonaws.com/39466-6987440.jpg
  • Analogy with 20th Century Brick-and-Mortar BusinessShift from Direct (buy from manufacturers)Image Source: http://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.com/tag/old-signs/
  • To Indirect (buy from retailers/middlemen)The web is now going from Direct (get/use data/content from source) to Indirect (get/use data/content from third party).APIs are how people get to your business.http://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.com/tag/old-signs/http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4072/4338895970_56d7989798_o.jpg
  • The Twitter Ecosystem = Twitter has grown so much because of the third parties that have used its API to create apps like TweetDeck.
  • Source: PowerPoint presentation by Sam Ramji, May 4, 2010.Siri purchased by Apple in April 2010.Siri is an iPhone app that helps you find movie and show tickets, tables at restaurants, etc. Siri does not create its own content or data. Instead, it taps into the APIs of these other sites.
  • Facebook betting its future on its APIsMobile = use APIs to access maps, location, social graphs, eventsFor successful companies, 80% of traffic will come from beyond the browser.Make your API useful and it will be carried to customers you’ve never met.Markets becoming more specialized and differentiated.http://i334.photobucket.com/albums/m431/igorkheifets/tweetdeckimproves.png
  • Twitter:Tail = Users send tweetsHead = Google & Microsoft pay millions to get the data from TwitterGameSpy:Tail = Limited access for freeHead = Unlimited access for a price
  • SEO and virality
  • SlideShare charges minimum $1/lead
  • Lessons learned:Control the loopGroupon creates the offers for businesses because they know what worksOptimize buyer experienceReduce barriers to buyOptimize end user experienceReduce clicks to leads
  • Presentation by Chris Tolles, CEO of Topix.netLaunched in 2004 as a news aggregator, focused locallyAdded communities in 2006Large increase in traffic from Google9 million unique visitors/month
  • Ad-supported siteMust get a LOT of traffic to make enough moneyNiche sites don’t scaleLead gen great for local (Groupon)Targeting is criticalhttp://multivu.prnewswire.com/mnr/affinion/27862/images/27862-hi-traffic.jpg
  • Product has to market itselfSEOSocial Optimization (invitations, sharing)Be distinct and be about something (Digg, HuffingtonPost)
  • Why was Ning not successful?Did not have control of their ad inventoryDid not have control over quality of contentDid not stand for one thingCould not go to advertisers to sell ads – for what audience?
  • Freemium = Free + Premiumhttp://gis.geoscape.eu/freemium/images/zerocost.png
  • Concept of freeloaders not a bad thing with digital goodsHeavier users will upgrade and payIdeal to have several tiersFree version encourages later adoptionChallenges with Freemium:Get a lot of users (viral)Convert a sufficient fraction
  • Lessons Learned by Animoto:People have to fall in love with your free product.~10% conversion rate (150,000 of 1.5 million)Created Facebook app in 2008 and had dramatic increase in installs (and huge increase in cloud bill)No way to monetize it, so shut it off.Need both popularity and monetization
  • Lessons Learned by Skype:Be sure to communicate your paid offerings to your customers (in-house ads)Expectation that people will pay for mobile apps, higher quality calls, HD videoLoves the iPad = video conferencing in the future
  • Lessons Learned by Pandora:Was originally subscription-only (2005-06)Only 0.5% converted from trialsWent to ad-supported model:Doesn’t scale with heavy usersAdvertisers want to buy your reach/breadthDiminishing marginal potential revenue with heavy usershttp://www.chrisbrogan.com/jameson-does-pandora-right/
  • Lessons Learned by Pandora:Customer segmentation = focused on very heavy listeners (5%)Pay-as-you-go option (monthly)Doesn’t require commitment; good for users early onPandora One subscription (yearly)40% of very heavy users convertedMobile was game changing for themLooking at cars as well
  • Final Thoughts from Chris Anderson:Transparency with users is really importantIf they don’t understand your business model, they will think they are getting screwed.Textbook publishers looking at e-books and selling tests, test prep, iPad bundles.
  • Presentation by Cary Rosenzweig, CEO of IMVU, Inc.IMVU = online community where members use 3D avatars to meet new people, chat, etc.50 million registered users4 million items in catalog (5,000 items a day added)Long Tail = Top 20 items only sell 0.2%. People want unique.Founded in 2004$22 million in revenue in 2009 (profitable and cash flow positive)
  • Members buy creditsMust offer lots of different payment options
  • Why do people buy?Enhance game playExpress their identityBuild relationships (gifts)20% of virtual goods on IMVU are purchased for other peopleShop (browse and buy) = fun
  • Presented by Rebecca Watson, gWalletVirtual currency platform for social media
  • Digital media revenue models:Subscription/pay to playAdvertisingDisplay, search, product placementFocused on impressions and eyeballsLicensing/SyndicationCost per article or gameMicro-transactions/virtual currencyUser buys strawberries in Farmville
  • Est. $1 billion in revenue in the U.S. in 2010 from virtual goods.
  • Why do users want to earn virtual currency?Virtual worlds = obtain an avatarSocial networks = communicate with othersGames = get premium accessApps = send a virtual goodeCommerce = get a product or service (software, data)Users can:Pay directlyEarn it
  • Advertisers have realized they’re selling to people, not pages/contentBehavioral targeting = pinpointed to a particular user
  • Re-marketing = person visits site, doesn’t purchase; show them an ad elsewhere later on
  • Works at all stages of the funnelBranding and performance drivenFocus on a niche that an advertiser would be interested inLong research times = travel, real estate, auto, financeHigh price items
  • Transparency and choice are key for consumersAt point of data collection, users should know/understandAt point of use, there should be an indicator and explain what data is being usedAdd link at bottom of every page of your site – “About Advertising” – in plain English, no sugar coating, links to preferences optionsOpt-out rates decrease with more transparency
  • http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/04/handicapping-internet-platform-wars.html
  • http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/04/handicapping-internet-platform-wars.html
  • See http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/03/state-of-internet-operating-system.html
  • Media (books, music, video); user reviews and ratings; purchase historySee http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/03/state-of-internet-operating-system.html
  • See http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/03/state-of-internet-operating-system.html
  • See http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/03/state-of-internet-operating-system.html
  • See http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/03/state-of-internet-operating-system.html
  • See http://radar.oreilly.com/2010/03/state-of-internet-operating-system.html
  • Transcript

    • 1. Highlights from the Web 2.0 Expo Conference
      Presented by Carol Cox
      May 18, 2010
      http://www.web2expo.com/webexsf2010
    • 2. Strategy & Business Models Track
      Sessions on:
      News Media: Success without Google
      Open APIs
      Lead Generation
      Ad-Supported Communities
      Freemium
      Virtual Goods
      Virtual Currency and Offer Walls
      Behaviorally-Targeted Advertising
      Plus:
      HTML5 vs. Flash
      The Internet Operating System
    • 3. 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      Panelists:
      Jessica Vascellaro (Wall Street Journal)
      Bernard Gershon (GershonMedia, LLC)
      Tristan Harris (Apture)
      Heidi Perry (ShareThis)
      Darian Shirazi (Fwix)
    • 4. 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      • Publishers have love/hate relationship with Google
    • 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      U-Turn Traffic
    • 5. 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      • Publishers looking for ways to increase engagement
    • 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      • Better engagement with users from:
    • 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      Business Models for Publishers:
      Advertising (still primary)
      Subscriptions
      Applications
    • 6. 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      More targeted display ads from “social signals”
      Groupon ads becoming content as well
    • 7. 1. Media’s New Business Model:Success without Google
      • Integrated and Immersive Ads
    • 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
      • Session by Sam Ramji, Sonoa
      • 8. API:
      Application Programming Interface
    • 9. 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
      • Shift from Direct (buy from manufacturers)
    • 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
      • To Indirect (buy from retailers/middlemen)
      Shift from Direct (buy from manufacturers)
    • 10. 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
    • 11. 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
      Successful applications will use many different APIs
      And they will take your applications everywhere.
    • 12. 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
      For successful companies, 80% of traffic will come from beyond the browser.
    • 13. 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
      • Use the tail to feed thehead
    • 2. Open APIs:Evolve Your Business Model
    • 14. 3. Sharing is the New Lead Gen
      • Session by RashmiSinha, CEO and Co-Founder of SlideShare
    • 3. Sharing is the New Lead Gen
      Lead generation models work well on the web if done right
    • 15. 3. Sharing is the New Lead Gen
      Wrong way = Fill out a form to get white paper/article
    • 16. 3. Sharing is the New Lead Gen
      • Better way = Don’t put up walls
    • 3. Sharing is the New Lead Gen
      • LeadShare Example Pricing
    • 3. Sharing is the New Lead Gen
      • Control the Loop
    • 4. Building an Ad-SupportedBusiness Around a Community
      • Session by Chris Tolles, CEO of Topix.net
    • 4. Building an Ad-SupportedBusiness Around a Community
      • Must get a LOT of traffic
    • 4. Building an Ad-SupportedBusiness Around a Community
      • Must be distinct and be about something
    • 4. Building an Ad-SupportedBusiness Around a Community
      • Why was Ning not successful?
    • 5. How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model
      Panelists:
      Chris Anderson, Wired editor and author of “Free” and “The Long Tail”
      Joe Kennedy, CEO of Pandora
      Christopher Dean, CSO of Skype
      Brad Jefferson, CEO of Animoto
    • 17. 5. How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model
      • Ideal to have several tiers
    • 5. How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model
      • Need both popularity and monetization
    • 5. How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model
    • 18. 5. How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model
      • Ad-supported Model
    • 5. How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model
      • Convert your heaviest users to a subscription
    • 5. How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model
      • Transparency with users is really important
    • 6. User-Generated Virtual Goods
      • Session by Cary Rosenzweig, CEO of IMVU, Inc.
    • 6. User-Generated Virtual Goods
    • 19. 6. User-Generated Virtual Goods
      • Why do people buy virtual goods?
    • 6. User-Generated Virtual Goods
      Virtual goods must have contextual meaning.
      UGC site must consist of a critical mass of people who care about each other.
      Psychographics, not demographics
    • 20. 7. How to Monetize Your Contentthrough Virtual Currency
      • Session by Rebecca Watson, gWallet
    • 7. How to Monetize Your Contentthrough Virtual Currency
      Digital media revenue models:
      Subscription/pay to play
      Advertising
      Licensing/Syndication
      Micro-transactions/
      virtual currency
    • 21. 7. How to Monetize Your Contentthrough Virtual Currency
    • 22. 7. How to Monetize Your Contentthrough Virtual Currency
      Why do users want to earn virtual currency?
    • 23. 7. How to Monetize Your Contentthrough Virtual Currency
      Offer Wall
      Users can select offers to complete and earn virtual currency (affiliate deals)
      Types of Offers:
      Watch a video ad
      Complete a survey
      Subscribe to a newspaper or magazine
      Purchase a product
      Trial a service or product
      Install an application
    • 24. 8. Behaviorally-Targeted Advertising
      Panelists:
      Satya Patel (Battery Ventures)
      Mathew Greitzer (Razorfish)
      Fran Maier (TRUSTe)
      Ingrid Sanders (TARGUSinfo)
      Omar Tawakol (BlueKai)
    • 25. 8. Behaviorally-Targeted Advertising
      • Re-marketing
    • 8. Behaviorally-Targeted Advertising
      • Focus on a niche with long research times and/or high price items
    • 8. Behaviorally-Targeted Advertising
      • Transparency and choice are key for consumers
    • Overall Themes
      The Web as a Platform
      Transition from information web (Google) to social web (Facebook)
      Transparency and Openness
    • 26. HTML5 vs. Flash
      • Session by Eric Meyer, Complex Spiral Consulting
      • 27. HTML5 advantages:
      • 28. Built on the “web stack”
      • 29. No plug-ins
      • 30. Not proprietary
      • 31. Flash advantages:
      • 32. Consistency across platforms
      • 33. Can access device’s web cam, mic, and P2P communication
      • 34. Both HTML5 and Flash can co-exist and be successful
    • The Internet Operating System:Keynote by Tim O’Reilly
    • The Internet Operating System:Keynote by Tim O’Reilly
    • The Internet Operating System:Keynote by Tim O’Reilly
      • Amazon
      • 49. Cloud computing platform with monetization for developers
      • 50. “Thing graph” – lots of data on stuff
      • 51. Fulfillment Web Service
      • 52. Weaknesses: Search; Advertising; Social Graph
    • The Internet Operating System:Keynote by Tim O’Reilly
      • Apple
      • 53. Building an alternative way to access info/media
      • 54. Web’s first real rival as a platform
      • 55. Don’t take the open web for granted
      • 56. Weaknesses: no cloud platform; latecomers to advertising and location; doesn’t understand importance of data (MobileMe example)
    • The Internet Operating System:Keynote by Tim O’Reilly
      • Facebook
      • 57. Social Graph
      • 58. Application Ecosystem
      • 59. Strategy of adding value to other sites: “Create more value than you capture”
      • 60. Weaknesses: Location, general purpose computing and storage platforms
    • The Internet Operating System:Keynote by Tim O’Reilly
      • Google
      • 61. Richest and most complete data subsystems
      • 62. Search, ads, maps, translation, videos, payments, email, etc.
      • 63. Weaknesses: anti-trust target; trying to own too much of the pie
      • 64. Weaker monetization for developers
      • 65. 70% of Apple apps are paid
      • 66. 40% of Android apps are paid
    • The Internet Operating System:Keynote by Tim O’Reilly
      • Microsoft
      • 67. Cloud computing platform, search, advertising, maps, speech recognition
      • 68. Willingness to partner
      • 69. Weakness: “Strategy tax” from legacy businesses
    • Thank you!
      Carol Cox
      @CivicLink