Planning for
the INTERcultural City
Practice + Visions
Tufts University Intercultural Planning Group
www.sites.tufts.edu/t...
Cynthia Silva Parker, Senior Associate,
Interaction Institute for Social Change (IISC)
Planning for the INTERcultural City
Interaction Institute for Social Change:
…radically influencing how change efforts are
initiated, designed, facilitated an...
Visions of an Intercultural City
“ The very least you can do in your life is to figure out
what to hope for. And the most ...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
What is Diversity?
• Diversity: Each individual is unique, and
groups of i...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
Why Diversity isn’t Enough
Diversity can…
• Create opportunities for
sharp...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
Equity and Inclusion are Critical
• Equity: All groups have access to the ...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
An Historical View & A Systems Approach
Education
Stereotypes and
Norms
Po...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
An Historical View & A Systems Approach
Education
Stereotypes and
Norms
Po...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
Dynamics of Inequity
• Systems of oppression operate on four
levels
–Inter...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
Levels of Racism
Racism:—a form of oppression based on the socially constr...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion:
Our Evolving Practice
• Grounded in colla...
© 2010, Interaction Institute
for Social Change
Examples of our Work
• Metropolitan Area Planning Council—Metro
Future Pro...
THANK YOU for coming!
Notes from the symposium will be posted on the ICP wiki:
http://sites.tufts.edu/tuftsicp/
Attendees ...
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  • Interculturalism implies that we plan with and not just for our diverse communities and that we actively engage with managing differences in our practiceWe conducted research this spring to understand whether the concept of cultural competency, frequently applied in the field of public health, has found its place in planning curriculaI give an overview of what culturally competent planning is, share highlights from our study’s findings, and discuss its implications for the future
  • Cynthia Silva Parker

    1. 1. Planning for the INTERcultural City Practice + Visions Tufts University Intercultural Planning Group www.sites.tufts.edu/tuftsicp October 22, 2010
    2. 2. Cynthia Silva Parker, Senior Associate, Interaction Institute for Social Change (IISC) Planning for the INTERcultural City
    3. 3. Interaction Institute for Social Change: …radically influencing how change efforts are initiated, designed, facilitated and experienced Our mission is to ignite and sustain social transformation, catalyze collective action and build collaborative skill to bring alive our vision of a just and sustainable world. We accomplish this by providing network-building, consulting, facilitation and training services designed to transform communities and organizations and build the capacity of leaders of social change.
    4. 4. Visions of an Intercultural City “ The very least you can do in your life is to figure out what to hope for. And the most you can do is live inside that hope… What I want is so simple I can’t almost say it; elementary kindness. Enough to eat, enough to go around. The possibility that kids might one day grow up to be neither the destroyers nor the destroyed. That’s about it.” Barbara Kingsolver Animal Dreams
    5. 5. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change What is Diversity? • Diversity: Each individual is unique, and groups of individuals reflect multiple dimensions of difference including: race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, age, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, cognitive styles, and much more. Valuing diversity means embracing and celebrating the rich dimensions of difference that exist in groups. (Adapted from Diversity Initiatives Campaign, The Diversity Project)
    6. 6. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change Why Diversity isn’t Enough Diversity can… • Create opportunities for sharper, more creative, strategic thinking • Increase the likelihood that programs, services and initiatives will be relevant to constituents • Demonstrate commitment to creating equal opportunities Diversity doesn’t necessarily • Guarantee cultural competency • Alter the dynamics of oppression or change the systems that create injustices • Lead to equitable outcomes for constituents • Ensure inclusion, fair operations or real opportunities within the organization
    7. 7. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change Equity and Inclusion are Critical • Equity: All groups have access to the resources and opportunities necessary to eliminate opportunity and resource gaps, and thereby, improve the quality of their lives. • Inclusion: a value and practice of ensuring that people feel they belong and that their input is valued by the whole (group, organization, society, system, etc.), particularly regarding decisions that affect their lives. (Adapted from Equity and Inclusion Campaign)
    8. 8. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change An Historical View & A Systems Approach Education Stereotypes and Norms Political Process Criminal Justice Employment and Training Housing Finance Health Unequal Opportunity and Inequitable Outcomes
    9. 9. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change An Historical View & A Systems Approach Education Stereotypes and Norms Political Process Criminal Justice Employment and Training Housing Finance Health Unequal Opportunity and Inequitable Outcomes
    10. 10. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change Dynamics of Inequity • Systems of oppression operate on four levels –Internalized –Interpersonal –Institutional –Structural • Inequities are produced and reproduced by overlapping, interlocking systems
    11. 11. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change Levels of Racism Racism:—a form of oppression based on the socially constructed concept of race exercised by the dominant racial group (whites) over non-dominant racial groups.* Racism operates on four levels** 1. Internalized Racism is the set of private beliefs, prejudices, and ideas that individuals have about the superiority of whites and the inferiority of people of color. Among people of color, it manifests as internalized oppression. Among whites, it manifests as internalized racial superiority. 2. Interpersonal Racism is the expression of racism between individuals. 3. Institutional Racism is discriminatory treatment, unfair policies and practices, inequitable opportunities and impacts within organizations and institutions, based on race. 4. Structural Racism is a system in which public policies, institutional practices, cultural representations, and other norms work in various, often reinforcing ways to perpetuate racial group inequality. * Adapted from People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond ** Source: Applied Research Center
    12. 12. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: Our Evolving Practice • Grounded in collaborative intent and collaborative process skills • Evolving from focus on diversity and inclusion to being more explicit about equity, power and undoing structural oppression • Holistic approach that builds community among social change agents • Capacity building as a frame • Multi-level approach to change: individual, interpersonal, organizational, systems and societal
    13. 13. © 2010, Interaction Institute for Social Change Examples of our Work • Metropolitan Area Planning Council—Metro Future Project • Cherish Every Child Springfield • Boston Promise Neighborhoods • Boston Climate Action Planning Process • Annie E. Casey Making Connections Initiative
    14. 14. THANK YOU for coming! Notes from the symposium will be posted on the ICP wiki: http://sites.tufts.edu/tuftsicp/ Attendees will be added to a Google Groups mailing list announcing future events (with the ability to opt out). Join us now for dinner in the Cabot mezzanine. Planning for the INTERcultural City

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